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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, for the pass 10 year, every of my bike i do the first oil change at 600mil. But now im busy with work and im wondering if anyone could tell me whats a okay limit to ride after 600mils. Thanks im now about 700mils and counting.....:(
 

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I'd do is ASAP. Metal shavings and other nastiness is being tossed around in your engine. I'm also told the the oil is a thinner weight break-in oil that facilitates break in, but shouldn't be used beyond the initial 600 miles
 

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If you actually saw the amount of metal and debris in the oil at even 50 miles you'd wince you waited so long. I make it a point of performing the first oil/filter change on a new or rebuilt engine at 20 miles, the first oil change is perhaps the most important one in the life of the engine. Frequent changes during the first 1k to remove all the debris is prudent preventative maintenance...
 

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I like to ride a new bike for the first 100 miles like I "stole it" then change the oil and filter quick. After that 1,000, then 3,000....................
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
so here is what happen, no one is availiable to do the first service tomorrow. so i went through the maintenace check list from owner's manual.
everything is about check hose or leak or level, I know all those are good, but few things i dont know are "belt deflection","bolts and nuts", "engine oil and filter".

I mean i do know how to change engin oil and i just have to get the right oil for this bike and the filter and tools.

so I want to ask you guys

first, how do you check belt ? what do you look for ? or adjust

second, what bolt and nuts do i have to check ?

third, whats the best oil and filter for our loved 9s. everyone is saying different thing....lol

thanks for the help
 

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so here is what happen, no one is availiable to do the first service tomorrow. so i went through the maintenace check list from mowner's manual.
everything is check hose or leak or level, I know all those are good, but one thing i dont know is "belt deflection","bolts and nuts", "engine oil and filter".

I mean i do know how to change engin oil and i just have to get the right oil for this bike and the filter and tools.

so I want to ask you guys

first, how do you check belt ? what do you look for ?

second, what bolt and nuts do i have to check ?

third, whats the best oil and filter for our loved 9s. everyone is saying different thing....lol

thanks for the help
There's an old Hebrew saying that if you ask 10 rabbi's to interpret the Torah, you will get 12 answers.

Well, when it comes to engine oil, ask 10 backyard mechanics, and you'll like get 12 or more answers.

Stick with a motorcycle-specific oil and you should be fine. Some just go with something that is JASO-MA rated. That will work too, if it's labeled JASO-MA rated it won't damage the wet clutch, but it may not have additives that can be beneficial to your bike. The only ones I would stay away from, are anything that is listed as a 'high efficiency' oil (they contain friction modifiers that can damage your clutch), automotive oil, or oil that does not contain the JASO-MA rating. Remember your clutch, engine, and transmission are all submerged in the same oil. You DO need oil that can handle that unique workload, so regular off-the-shelf automotive oil won't cut it. Anything with a JASO-MA rating will not likely damage your clutch, and anything motorcycle specific is generally going to handle the unique needs of a V-Twin and transmission the best.

For what it's worth, I use Valvoline full synthetic motorcycle. Valvoline has been good to me in the past, it's readily available (even Wal-Mart has it), and it's priced fairly competitively among the full synthetics. Other popular motorcycle synthetics are Mobile 1, and Amsoil. There is also a heavy equipment synthetic from Rotella called 'T6' in a 15W-40 weight that carries all of the ratings that some people like for the cost savings. (Synthetic oil much cheaper than M/C synthetic, while retaining the necessary ratings)

For filter, there are lots of options. DEFINITELY change it at 600 miles, as it can contain a lot of nastiness during the break in! Kawasaki OEM is a good choice, others like K&N, Bosch, Wix (NAPA Gold) or Valvoline Purolator. For a cost savings option, I know some folks like the cheaper Wal-Mart supertech filters. FWIW, I use Wix or Purolator, for the same reasons listed above for the oil. Inexpensive, readily available, and premium quality.

How to change the oil:

Step 0:

Take the bike around the block. The oil will drain more completely when it's warm. Bike doesn't need to be HOT, just a little warm.


Step 1:

Locate the drain plug underneath the motorcycles engine. I don't recall the exact size of the bolt. 10? 12? It's metric though, find a socket that fits it, put a drain pan that can hold 4 quarts of oil or more underneath it, and loose the socket. Be careful not to drop the bolt in the oil pan. Won't hurt anything if you do, but it can be a pain to fish out. Make sure the washer is in tact, and don't lost it! Wipe down the bolt and washer, and set aside.

Step 2:

While the oil drains, move to the front of the bike and remove the two bolts holding the regulator/rectifier cover on, and set it aside. Then, loosen the TOP of the two bolts holding on the regulator/rectifier, and set it aside. Then, take and gently turn the regulator/rectifier downard, revealing the oil filter. It's also a good idea to take the connector for the R/R off and clean it, as they often get filled with moisture and filth.

Step 3:

Once the oil has finished draining from the bike, stand it up and let it drain completely, then place it back on it's side stand (you can skip this step if you used a lift to hold the bike straight up when draining)

Step 4:

Loosen the oil filter. Often, the factory oil filter is very difficult to remove by hand. You will probably need an oil filter wrench. I am a huge fan of this one:

http://www.jpcycles.com/product/63600LI

It attaches to a 3/8" drive ratchet, and 'bites' the filter, getting it off cleanly and without crushing it. It is springloaded, and does not need to be clamped onto, adjusted, tightened, or otherwise, which is nice considering the small amount of room you have.

Step 5:

Take some of your new engine oil, and pour it in the filter until it is about 1/3 full, this is to prime the system so it isn't starved of oil on startup. Then, dip your finger in the oil, and wipe it along the rim of the filter, and apply some to the threads inside the filter. This prevent siezing, and it also helps make a good seat. Install the filter on the bike snug/hand tight. Do not tool-tighten, that is way too tight! In the future, it should be able to be removed by hand.

Step 6:

Reinstall the oil drain plug, remembering the washer. Discard of the old oil properly (many recycling centers, auto parts stores, etc., will take old oil. Some for free, some for a small disposal fee)

Step 7:

Locate the oil fill cap, on the left side of the engine. Using a wide-bladed flat head screwdriver (or even a thin chisel!), loosen it and remove it. Pour in 3.5 quarts of oil. Stand the bike up, and start it. Watch the oil pressure light, it should go off within a couple of seconds after starting the bike, if it does not, shut it off and restart it after a few seconds. Take the bike around the block again. Then, have a helper stand the bike up, and look in the sight glass on the left hand side which will tell you if you have the correct amount of oil in. Add any you might need to add, but do not overfill. If you do overfill, you will notice oil on the right side of the engine from it spraying into the intake.

Good luck!

The other maintenance items are specific and technical. I would recommend you go to Kawasaki.com and purchase a service manual. They have digital ones there fairly inexpensive. That service manual will outline the steps needed to do each maintenance item. Be warned, though, that the service manual was written for service professionals. If you think you might not be able to follow directions written for a mechanic (if you need the 'for dummies' version), then it might be best to just take it in when you can and have your dealer do it. (I don't know your skill level, so I'm just letting you know.)

Finally, the most complicated, time consuming, and technical portion is the valve adjustment. This might be one that's worth letting the dealership do. If you think you can tackle it, do a search on this forum, check out YouTube, and definitely buy the service manual. I've not yet done the valve clearance check on a Vulcan, so I can't comment to that. But if you'd like to tackle it, go for it! But you'd be wise to do your research first so you have idea of what you're doing before you go tearing into it. The manual makes it sound easy by saying 'inspect clearance'. It's rather involved, requires the removal of the fuel tank and the complete removal of the valve covers.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There's an old Hebrew saying that if you ask 10 rabbi's to interpret the Torah, you will get 12 answers.
.................

wow, just wow. I can say you are the most helpful person i seen so far on this forum. no offence to others who also helped me but wow, you are very detail to how it suposed to go.

so here is what the owners manul show for 600 service
Valve clearance inspect is not include untill 15k. so on that im good for now.

1. throttle control system inspect: i adjusted first week after i got the bike to fit me well.

2. idle speed inspect: idle seem fine to me not too fast or slow as long as the bike warms up and have a stable slow beat to it. most of my other bike idle faster than vulcan as i remember. my shadow 750 was faster too.

3. fuel leak inspect: i do not see any leak on the floor nor from the bike in any parts or in between parts. I clean my bike way too often to look everywhere and anywhere for oil and leaks.

4. fuel hoses damage inspect: come on, its a brand new bike and if it broke, it leak. so there is no leak and it means its good. i think

5. fuel hose installation condition inspect: same as #4. if it was installed incorrectly, it would have problem from the get go when i was riding it home from dealer and all this 750 miles i have now.

6. coolant level inspect: Thats easy.

7. coolant leak inspect: thats easy too. no leak

8. radiator hose damage inspect: i checked when i install the crash bar.

9. radiator hose install condition inspect: i did that too, its tight.

10. evaporative emission control system function( only CA): i have no idea what is it........????? what is it ???????

11. clutch operation play inspect: i adjusted right after i got home from dealer and everything is fine.

12: drive belt DEFLECTION inspect: what is that mean ???

13: drive belt wear inspect: belt seem fine and does not have any rubed off or scraps off around.

14. brake fluid leak inspect: nothing leaking and levels are good.

15. brake hoses damage inspect: everything seem tight and snug

16. brake hoses installation condition inspect: its good as i see.

17. brake fluid level inspect: its in good level.

18. brake operation inspect: i ride everyday in city so my brake is pretty much working well as i expected.

19. brake light switch inspect: it worked.

20. steering play inspect: really ???? it truns left and right and no cable gets in the way or loose parts....good enought ? lol

21. BOLTS and NUTS TIGHTNESS inspect: this one is the one i do NOT know, i can tight bolts and nuts, but just which onces i have to check and tight up ?
please help

22. Engine oil change: still thinking what oil i will be using, depends on what my local autozone have in stock for now.

23. oil filter replace: also still thinking, so many choice from all you guys but depends what i can get from autozone or local store.

So please someone help me and let me know what bolts and nuts to tight. and do i have to do anything to the belt? it seem fine to me. its pretty right and snug. and oil brand and filter i already have an idea now so im just thinking.

I'm really thanksful for your help of explaning how to change the oil.
please answer other two question i have for #12 and #21

thanks
 

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Evodog,

You'll need the service manual (Kawasaki.com, digital version is cheaper) for the nuts and bolts tightness. It will outline which ones to check, and the inch pound/foot pound ratings for each. You'll need a torque wrench.

Make sure to visually inspect all of your hoses. They could be COMING loose but not loose yet. Just take a flashlight and look under the tank, look at the coolant hoses, etc.

As far as the belt deflection. Move towards the back of your bike and locate (on the swingarm, maybe behind your swingarm bag) a small 'window' with notches in it. Take a finger and push down in the belt with about 10 pounds of force (pretend like you are picking up 10 pounds upside down). The CORRECT way to do this is with a belt tension gauge, but I'm going to assume you don't have one, and this method is 'acceptable' (IMO). Someone correct me if I'm wrong but I believe the service manual calls for about 1/4" of deflection with 10 pounds of force. Just make sure it's not so tight you can't move it with 10 pounds of force, and not so loose that it can easily be pushed outside of that sight window. Measure your deflection at that window.

As far as the evaporative control, do you have a California model? If you do you'll need to check that out. Couldn't help ya there, I have a 'regular America' version. LOL

-John
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As far as the evaporative control, do you have a California model? If you do you'll need to check that out. Couldn't help ya there, I have a 'regular America' version. LOL

-John[/QUOTE]

I do have the california model and i think that may not be a big deal. but thank you for the detail info about the belt adjustment.

guess i will have to look around for all the tools i need to do my first service myself and buy the service manul.
 

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[/QUOTE]I do have the california model and i think that may not be a big deal. but thank you for the detail info about the belt adjustment.

guess i will have to look around for all the tools i need to do my first service myself and buy the service manul.[/QUOTE]

If you need any help or run into any issues let me know. I have a garage full of tools, digital manual, and close enough to help.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I do have the california model and i think that may not be a big deal. but thank you for the detail info about the belt adjustment.

guess i will have to look around for all the tools i need to do my first service myself and buy the service manul.[/QUOTE]

If you need any help or run into any issues let me know. I have a garage full of tools, digital manual, and close enough to help.[/QUOTE]

ah, thank you!!!!!!!! i dont know where do i download the service manul so i can check the bolt and nuts, would you be able to e-mail me ? if yes i will PM you my e-mail address.

I'm calling around my local shop to see who have what oil and filter.
and tool to open the filter and the oil pan.

thank you thank you!!!!!
 

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Just let me know and I can send you the specific Spec sheets for the various torque requirements for the drain plug and filter as well as the rectifier mounting bolts. Also harbor freight has a great sale on torque wrenches About $10 dollars each.

I am out this afternoon but will be home this evening.

Sent from my DROID2
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just let me know and I can send you the specific Spec sheets for the various torque requirements for the drain plug and filter as well as the rectifier mounting bolts. Also harbor freight has a great sale on torque wrenches About $10 dollars each.

I am out this afternoon but will be home this evening.

Sent from my DROID2
thanks for the help, i just bought the oil and all the tools, about to do the oil change first than check other stuff later. i didnt buy the torque wrenche because i dont know which one to buy since i dont have the service manul to see the requirement level. but i got the idea.

i'm going to do the oil now~ wish me luck:)
 

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thanks for the help, i just bought the oil and all the tools, about to do the oil change first than check other stuff later. i didnt buy the torque wrenche because i dont know which one to buy since i dont have the service manul to see the requirement level. but i got the idea.

i'm going to do the oil now~ wish me luck:)
Good Luck... Just in case Oil Drain plug: 15ftlbs (20N-m), Regulator/Rectifier bolts: 61inlbs **NOTE INCH POUNDS** (6.9N-m). Oil Filter: 13ftlbs (18N-m), but for the filter I usually lube the gasket and tighten hand tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Finished oil change took me about an hour with all the prep and clean up. It is really easy as long as i got the right tool. One thing i want to share, honda oil filter release tool work super well!! It fits deap and solid. Open right up and tight it back in.
For all the stuff i bought total cost $80.
I bought oil pan, oil funnle, 4 qt of valvoline 10w-40 convetional oil for motorcycle from pepboys, kawasaki oem oil filter and honda oil filter tool from dealer, also a oil tank to i can collect them and take it to recycle. For all this i could re-use. The only thing is later i only need to buy oil and filter. Now i just have to do the inspection for all the list. Well, hard part is already finished, thank god and all you guys help!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Special thanks for bosco and roman!!!
 

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Great job. Piece of cake and now you can save some money and have some fun doing this yourself. :D
 
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