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Discussion Starter #1
Who has put Engine Ice coolant in their 1700?
Does it really make a difference?
Will it hurt the engine or coolant system?
Did you completely drain the old coolant and put in straight Ice? Or do you mix it?

I am thinking about draining my 2016 Voyager's Coolant and replacing it with Engine Ice. I already have the Ivan Flash and it does help but here in Louisiana it really gets hot in the summer and I was hoping to lower the running temp a few more degrees.:sweat:
 

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the best coolant is just plain straight water, but add some rust inhibators to the water = 50/50 pre-mix, because straight concentrated rad fluid would not be as good as straight water as coolant
 

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On my 750 I had flushed the system and replaced the five hoses and thermostat. I wasn't having any issues but it was simply time to do so. At that time the bike was 10 years old without any cooling system maintenance having been done. I used Engine Ice as the replacement coolant.

Once done, I noticed the temp gauge was running about a needle's-width, maybe two, lower in temp from that point on.

I don't know which made the bigger impact, the Engine Ice or the new thermostat. But there you are as to how the machine was affected.

Engine Ice won't hurt anything. You don't have to mix it as it is pre-mixed. Flushing the system is not difficult but it is time consuming. (If you're thinking about maximizing your cooling system effectiveness, I'd suggest that you go ahead and flush the system. There are plenty of how-to videos online. Also get information on YOUR engine as there may be bolts to remove that you wouldn't think about in order to get all of the water passages emptied.) You have to wait for the engine to cool after cranking it each time. I had other maintenance things to attend to so I wasn't wasting my time during the cool-down parts.

All-in-all, I'm glad I did it.
 

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On my 750 I had flushed the system and replaced the five hoses and thermostat. I wasn't having any issues but it was simply time to do so. At that time the bike was 10 years old without any cooling system maintenance having been done. I used Engine Ice as the replacement coolant.

Once done, I noticed the temp gauge was running about a needle's-width, maybe two, lower in temp from that point on.

I don't know which made the bigger impact, the Engine Ice or the new thermostat. But there you are as to how the machine was affected.

Engine Ice won't hurt anything. You don't have to mix it as it is pre-mixed. Flushing the system is not difficult but it is time consuming. (If you're thinking about maximizing your cooling system effectiveness, I'd suggest that you go ahead and flush the system. There are plenty of how-to videos online. Also get information on YOUR engine as there may be bolts to remove that you wouldn't think about in order to get all of the water passages emptied.) You have to wait for the engine to cool after cranking it each time. I had other maintenance things to attend to so I wasn't wasting my time during the cool-down parts.

All-in-all, I'm glad I did it.
+1 on flushing the system. I know some folks flush with vinegar, but I don't recommend it. Use a cooling system flush product. These are (or should be) alkaline and are better for the aluminum in the system. Personally, I like Royal Purple's Cooling System Flush. The cooling system has a coating that peals off and can slow coolant flow, or possibly even stop up the radiator some. A bunch of that stuff came out when I flushed my system. I don't know if it cooled better after that because of that alone or if some of the improvement was because I also added Purple Ice to the coolant.

Whatever coolant you use, make sure it is the OAT type. Do not use any coolant that has silicates! Kawasaki coolant is technically OAT, but very few coolant manufactures use the same corrosion inhibitor they do. I use O'Reily's 50/50 Universal Coolant (yellow, not the orange Dex-Cool compatible). Dex-Cool formulations may be OK, but I'd rather be safe than sorry so I avoid them.

I don't know how much more effective Engine Ice or any additives are, but Engine Ice and Royal Purple's Purple Ice additive both contain some chemicals that are supposed to increase the cooling efficiency. Those chemicals are not in most coolants.

BTW, never run straight water in a street bike unless the manual says to do so. Water is too corrosive and does not have the proper lubricity for the water pump. Racing bikes use straight water or additives that do not contain glycols because glycols are not allowed at most racetracks. They are hazardous because they are too slippery. But bike racers expect to have to replace their water pumps more often because of that, too.
 

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The best IS NOT WATER!
We use coolant because it keeps the variety of metals from killing the engine, from plugging up the radiator,
keeps the water boiling level HIGHER,
and keeps the freezing level LOWER,
plus other things like rust inhibitors.

SO no water is a bad choice!

But go ahead and use water, its YOUR bike!
Your engine will not thank you!
 

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Dex-Cool formulations may be OK, but I'd rather be safe than sorry so I avoid them.
Just in case anyone cares....

I run Dex-Cool in two liquid cooled bikes including my 01 1500 Vulcan which has had Dex-Cool in it since it's first coolant change about 15 years ago. One tricky thing I find is that after a couple of years the old coolant coming out is indistinguishable from the new coolant going in so I have to be careful when premixing to keep the old stuff away from the new stuff.
 

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Water is one of the best choices for liquid cooling applications due to its high heat capacity and thermal conductivity. It is also compatible with copper, which is one of the best heat transfer materials to use for your fluid path.
 

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Strongly disagree or you wrong

Water is one of the best choices for liquid cooling applications due to its high heat capacity and thermal conductivity. It is also compatible with copper, which is one of the best heat transfer materials to use for your fluid path.
Race tracks do not let cars use antifreeze but this stuff

https://www.redlineoil.com/waterwetter



Need some additive to lubricant cooling system pumps
 

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Water is one of the best choices for liquid cooling applications due to its high heat capacity and thermal conductivity. It is also compatible with copper, which is one of the best heat transfer materials to use for your fluid path.
If it were only that simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So Engine Ice Good or No Good ?
I think when I service my bike getting ready for the spring season of ridding. I am going to flush my cooling system with royal purple flush for motorcycles (because last year I did top off my cooling system with tap water) and go with the Engine Ice coolant. Hopefully between the van Flash, the leather heat deflector (between my legs) and the Engine Ice it won't be so bad at a stop light when it is 100 + degrees outside.

Also does anybody ever bother pulling there engine oil screen when they change there oil. I think I will since I never did it when I bought the bike new 2 years ago and I am draining the cooling system anyway. The manual says you have to remove the cooling tube from the left hand side of the engine so you can get the screen out.
 

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Engine Ice is fine.

As for the oil screen, I have pulled it once in the entire time I've had it (since '06). There was nothing stuck in it and I haven't pulled it since (3 years now). Maybe I'll do it every several oil changes and not do it every time until I start seeing crud in the screen.
 

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Engine Ice is OK, but...

Engine Ice is made with propylene glycol (PG). PG is less toxic than ethylene glycol (EG) and much better for the environment, but there are some drawbacks. Assuming a 50/50 water to product mixture, PG will freeze at a higher temperature than and equivalent EG solution. Probably not an issue in Louisiana using a 50/50 mixuture. PG is less effective at heat transfer than EG. Engine Ice has additives that are supposed to improve the heat transfer, but how effective they are is open to debate.

If, and that is a big if, the additives that improve heat transfer actually work, then using an EG OAT coolant with an additive like Purple Ice, or possibly Water Wetter, would probably provide more efficient cooling than Engine Ice.
 

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straight water is the best heat dissipator, nothing can beat just straight water to dissipate the most heat, but don't put just straight tap water in your coolant system, use a mix of water and an antifreeze rust inhibators because straight water will rust and corrode metal parts, so use a 50/50 mix of straight water and an antifreeze rust inhibitors, but straight engine ice coolant is not the best dissipator of heat, water is.
 

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I flushed mine 3 times with distilled water. The last flush was clear so then I added the Engine Ice. Didn't see any difference. Live and learn I guess. Won't use it again on the next flush.
 

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straight water is the best heat dissipator, nothing can beat just straight water to dissipate the most heat, but don't put just straight tap water in your coolant system, use a mix of water and an antifreeze rust inhibators because straight water will rust and corrode metal parts, so use a 50/50 mix of straight water and an antifreeze rust inhibitors, but straight engine ice coolant is not the best dissipator of heat, water is.
1 - Don't use tap water at all. Use distilled water. Tap water contains minerals that can precipitate out and clog the cooling system. If it has been chlorinated, the chlorine and the compounds that result from the chlorine disinfection process will attack aluminum. The corrosion inhibitors in coolants are not designed to prevent this type of corrosion.

2 - As far as I can tell, Engine Ice only comes as "Ready to use" meaning it is already a 50/50 coolant solution. Further dilution is not needed.

3 - Coolants come as concentrates, or as "Ready to use" 50/50 water/coolant mixtures. If you buy a concentrate, dilute it 50/50 with DISTILLED water not tap water. If you buy a "Ready to use" product, don't dilute it at all.

4 - btom, I understand what you are saying, now, but the way you say it may further confuse someone who is already confused. DO NOT make a 50/50 water/additive mix to put in your cooling system. You will damage your bike. Products like Water Wetter and Purple Ice are additives with corrosion inhibitors ("antifreeze rust inhibators" in you words), plus other additives, are not meant to be used at those concentrations. You should use a 50/50 mixture of water/coolant. The coolant will contain the inhibitors, etc. Just make sure you are using an OAT type of coolant. Water wetter, Purple Ice, and such may or may not improve cooling, as they claim, but they will add extra corrosion inhibitors.

If someone insists on using all water (no glycols) in a street vehicle, they should add something like Water Wetter or Purple Ice to get some corrosion inhibition, cavitation prevention, and lubricity for the water pump.

5 - As I mentioned in my previous post, Engine Ice is propylene glycol based. Propylene glycol is less effective than ethylene glycol at heat transfer. Engine Ice, Water Wetter, and Purple Ice contain compounds that are intended to increase the heat transfer properties of the coolant. I seriously doubt that those compounds can improve the heat transfer ability of propylene glycol to the point that it is equal to or better than ethylene glycol. Adding those compounds to ethylene glycol based coolants may or may not improve their heat transfer ability.

6 - Do not depend on the color of a coolant product to determine if is the correct type. There is no standard for that. Read the labels or research online.

Bottom line, it is best to use a 50/50 distilled water/coolant mix. The coolant should be OAT technology for our bikes. Dex-Cool types may be OK. I don't use Dex-Cool products as I have some concerns about using them in a motorcycle.
 

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Who has put Engine Ice coolant in their 1700?
Does it really make a difference?
Will it hurt the engine or coolant system?
Did you completely drain the old coolant and put in straight Ice? Or do you mix it?

I am thinking about draining my 2016 Voyager's Coolant and replacing it with Engine Ice. I already have the Ivan Flash and it does help but here in Louisiana it really gets hot in the summer and I was hoping to lower the running temp a few more degrees.:sweat:
I use it on my 900. Flushed the system and filled it with engine ice. I did see a difference down here in the south Texas heat.
 
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