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Hello everybody

Stupid question. I have my Vulcan 2000 for 2 weeks now and like to know how you clean your engine without getting white spots un the black parts.

Any tips?

Many thanks

Thorsten
 

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White spots?? What kind of soap are you using? I use the same car soap I use on my vehicles.....works just fine......I have been in the habit recently of using my Stihl gas blower to remove "most" of the water from the bike....works extremely well...especially in and around the engine compartment.
 

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Another product thats really cool is (S100) I buy it at Harley dealerships its the only place i have found it , when you spray it on your black areas like the motor or frame it looks just like new . I spray my engine down every couple of weeks with it , a can usually lasts me 3-4 months...... Bulldozer
 

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I'll wager that your white spots are coming from hard water that wasn't dried off the engine before your got the motor hot after washing it. :rolleyes:
 

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Being from Canada, maybe the white spots are ice formations from not drying it very well? :D

I just use the same soap i use when washing the car. Blowdrying the water so it doesn't leave puddles is a good idea, although i've never done it.
 

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White spots are crystallized calcium after the water evaporated, I guarantee, unless you used a powdered soap that crystallized after drying because you failed to rinse completely.

What soap to use? I suggest using plain old dish liquid, a very small amount, in a bucket with warm water and a toothbrush for the small areas. If you need more solvent power, Simple Green works, or you can use a number of kitchen cleaners like 409 or Fantastic to spot clean areas.

A product that is waterless that can be used for detailing an engine that has no particulate matter (like sand) on it, is called "Can Do", by a company called Saeng TA. I have used it for years on my bikes and on the paint of my cars for quick detailing (even for a concours show prep one year). It does not replace cleaning with soap and water but will clean and wax in one step. I like it especially because it contains Carnuba Wax as the wax. This is the best overall wax as it lets the paint breathe and does not seal the paint like silicone based waxes do. Can Do also works great for cleaning lexan and plexiglass. Honda also makes a good detailing spray of a similar nature. But these all are used primarily for painted and chromed surfaces.

I prefer to towel dry all wetted and rinsed areas, using a tongue depressor and a paper towel for smaller areas (or an old towel that is worn thin on the tongue depressor). I try to towel dry everything and only use compressed air for left over areas I cannot reach.
 

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Try using S100, works great, just dont over spray on your leather bags. In between washes, use a detailing spray, when you dont have time to do full wash or bike is not super dirty. Detailer in a can uses no water, just spray on and wipe off with micro fiber towel only. Try to use a spray cleaner with a anti corrosion additive especially if you live or ride near the beach. Turtle wax also makes a car wash that has carnuba wax in it and works well. I would stay away from dish soap because it works as a stripper and will take off previous wax, unless your going to hard wax it right after. Use a leaf blower to blow off excess water then use a chammi cloth to finish.
 

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ANY soap strips wax. Regardless of its claims to the contrary. Dish soap is perfectly safe to use on painted surfaces. The key to using it or any other soap in water is not to get too slap happy with the amount you put in the bucket.

The reason dish soap is good to use on a bike (or car) is that it is made to emulsify oil so it takes off oily residue. You only need a very small amount in water. Your wax will not come off as long as you don't have to rub too hard, but eventually you have to rewax the surface if you are serious about protecting your paint or chrome.
 
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