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Discussion Starter #1
I had to make an emergency stop the other day on my 900 (accident avoided), but encountered something unusual. When I pulled in the clutch lever and applied the front brake simultanously, the throttle seemed to freeze with the engine revved up (to around 3-4K) as I braked to a stop. I had just enough room to quickly release the front brake and throttle, then reapplied the front brake again. I had never thought of this before, but when you apply the front brake suddenly, your grip holds the throttle in position as you squeeze, thus freezing the throttle. When I've practiced emergency braking in the past, I coast a very short distance before applying the brake, so don't encounter this problem. Has anyone else ever experienced this? Is this normal?
 

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Don't do that !!! Pay attention - quick looking at your Cell Phone!!!

Sounds normal emergency braking grab both levers sounds like panic stop caused throttle to stay open. Normal no mechanical problem.

Cager's are a scary bunch will stop in the middle of the road if they are lost!!! Make U-Turns anywhere they please!!!

Always leave yourself enough space and explore all escape routes!!!
 

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@jbiggers This is why it is important to practice emergency stops.

Another version of the issue:
Accelerating hard with the right hand...
As your fingers open on the left grip to pull in the clutch, your left hand could come off the grip. This is more pronounced with the drag bars on the custom, but something to think about.

I noticed a change when I went to different gloves. I bought new better gloves that have the third and fourth fingers connected. That changes the dexterity of my hands on the grips for clutch, brake, or throttle work.

The best thing to do is practice stopping way harder than you do in normal riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
WestcoastKevin, yep, sounds normal then. I do practice very hard stops, so i won't have to stop that hard on the road. The issue here was reaction time, as I felt I had to respond instantly.
 

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This indicates you have a poor throttle grip position. The "correct" way to grip the throttle is: at idle your wrist is flat. In order to add throttle you have twist down so your wrist is bent up. Don't shift your grip at cruising speeds. In a hard stop, your wrist straightens as you reach for the brake, rolling back the throttle without thinking about it. If your wrist is straight at highway speeds, grabbing the brake quickly will always result in increased throttle. If you forget to pull in the clutch, the engine will over-ride the brakes and you won't stop.
It's awkward at first, but with practice, it becomes normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
SteveJB, thanks, I'd never heard that before. However, you might end up with carpal tunnel on that right wrist if you have to hold it for a long time. But I get your point.
 

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This article talks about the 2-finger cover method, which is how I was taught: Wrist/Throttle position. I agree with the article that you want your wrist straight while cruising. You should practice rolling the throttle forward as you reach pull in the brakes. A throttle boss will help with that, but don't rely on it. I also like what they said about downshifting while stopping and matching engine speed to wheel speed. For this, you need to control the throttle, not just let it flip forward to idle position, during a stop. Emergency situations "evolve". Sometimes what starts as an emergency stop situation turns into a situation requiring acceleration in a different direction. Been there, done that, and am still alive to talk about because I did. Practice downshifting while braking and accelerating in a slightly different direction at different points while braking. Ideally, even in a panic or emergency stop, you should be in first gear by the time you come to a stop. That's not always possible, but if you are only one gear off from the correct gear for your wheel speed, you should still be able to maneuver out of an evolving situation with a bit more throttle.
 
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Sabre-t, I read the article you posted. The interesting thing about the right hand, is we are asking it to do three things at once: roll on the throttle, grip the front brake, and steer the bike. It takes a fair amount of dexterity to do all three equally well. There are various articles and methods described to avoid emphasizing one function over the others. I use 4 fingers around the throttle most of the time, but revert to 2 fingers guarding the brake in more risky high traffic situations (all while trying to keep my wrist relaxed and flat). I also see no way to avoid using your thumb when squeezing the brake, since your hand uses it to form one side of the "clamp" to squeeze the brake. Since the thumb MUST be involved in braking, the hand "clamp" is what holds the throttle in a "stuck" position. In this case this was harmless (assuming you also pull in the clutch), just unexpected.

We also could get into a discussion about why the right hand is being asked to do so much at once, but that is a basic control design layout question best left for another time.
 

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jbibbers, you are right. It's not easy. That's why you have to practice to develop the technique and muscle memory. Because you need to control the throttle, you use your thumb to help with the throttle roll while also using it to anchor your hand while pulling the brake lever. Again, easier said than done and requires practice, just like controlling the throttle while steering during slow maneuvers requires practice. As to a discussion of the layout, it is what it is and we have to deal with what we have.
 

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Good post OP.

As a new rider I have experienced the "throttle still on" when braking, but luckily never in an E-stop.

I noticed every once in a while when slowing down in preparation for a 90 degree turn, when I pull the clutch lever in to shift up or down, I could still hear the engine RPM's at an above-idle rate. So, as stated above, when I was applying the front brake I was NOT allowing the throttle to snap back to the idle position. So now I have a practice point - to be sure, when I touch the front brake lever, that I allow the throttle to snap back to idle position.

Practice. Practice. Practice.

CMOS
 

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They make a lever/Speed control that you hold with the fat padded part of the heel of your hand that should give resting position wherever you want and reduce grip fatigue and should roll back when you let off, might help some.
 
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