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Discussion Starter #1
I've recently tried to start my Vulcan only to find that the lights will not come on and the engine won't attempt to turn over. I literally turn the key and nothing at all happens.
The battery is fully charged, so it looks like an electrical issue.

Has anyone had this same problem, or know of some common electrical problems?

Thanks!
 

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First thing to check is the battery connections and fuses. Battery connections loosening is a common issue with the 500. Easy fix, just tighten them. I have them checked every time I have the bike serviced.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I read the sticky thread and it was very helpful.

I was wondering if it could also be a dead battery? The trickle charger reads a fully charged battery, however someone suggested to me that if the battery goes completely dead multiple times (which I have done a few times since I am a new inexperienced rider) that the battery might be completely done.
When I bought the bike 2 years ago, it was a new battery. Does this make sense to anyone?
 

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Charger lights are almost meaningless for stating battery health.

You can:

1. Take the battery in for a load test, or
2. We can teach you how to do a quick and dirty battery test at home.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Charger lights are almost meaningless for stating battery health.

You can:

1. Take the battery in for a load test, or
2. We can teach you how to do a quick and dirty battery test at home.

That would be amazing! Is it relatively easy to do? I'm not very skilled with motorcycles and rely a lot on the internet to teach me.
But I'm always up for learning how to do it myself!
 

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If you are willing to learn a new skill, we are willing to teach.

First thing is you need a meter. $20 will buy all one needs for motorcycle work.
They are available at most auto parts places, Home Depot, Radio Shack, Harbor Freight, etc.
If you are unsure, post back with what you are looking at and we can make a recommendation.
After purchase, we will instruct you on its use.

This tool and knowledge will never be a waste of time and money.
 

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it would depend on how the charger is hooked up, as well, as to whether it is charging or reading the battery properly. Do you have a charging connector wired to the battery, or are you taking off the seat and connecting the charger directly to the battery?

If the wiring is loose to the bike, it would also be loose to the charger.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you are willing to learn a new skill, we are willing to teach.

First thing is you need a meter. $20 will buy all one needs for motorcycle work.
They are available at most auto parts places, Home Depot, Radio Shack, Harbor Freight, etc.
If you are unsure, post back with what you are looking at and we can make a recommendation.
After purchase, we will instruct you on its use.

This tool and knowledge will never be a waste of time and money.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Commerci...timeter-M1015B/202353292?N=5yc1vZboffZ1z10piz
This is the model that i purchased after suspecting electrical issues
 

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An analog meter is nice to have and there are certain jobs they excel at, but in this case, you will need a digital meter.

Also, in an analog meter, an X1 scale is needed which that one does not have.

Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
An analog meter is nice to have and there are certain jobs they excel at, but in this case, you will need a digital meter.

Also, in an analog meter, an X1 scale is needed which that one does not have.

Sorry.
Thanks for the information. I have got a digital meter, however I am curious why the Analog one does not work?

Either way, I am ready to tackle the next steps as a weekend project!
 

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Post back with make and model number of your new meter.
Analogs are a poor choice for battery/charging work as 10ths of a volt count and that is just too hard to see on an analog meter.
 

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OK:

1. Insert black meter lead into center plug, red to right side plug.
2. Turn switch to 20 vdc range.
3. Take voltage reading across battery.
4. Turn on key and take another reading.
5. Leave key on for a full 5 minutes and then take another reading.
6. Turn off key and after 5 minutes, take another reading.

Post back with 4 readings.

Be SURE and ask any questions or if something is not clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
OK:

1. Insert black meter lead into center plug, red to right side plug.
2. Turn switch to 20 vdc range.
3. Take voltage reading across battery.
4. Turn on key and take another reading.
5. Leave key on for a full 5 minutes and then take another reading.
6. Turn off key and after 5 minutes, take another reading.

Post back with 4 readings.

Be SURE and ask any questions or if something is not clear.
With the engine off, the reading is 1.92
When i turned the engine on, it was 0.01
When i left the engine on for 5 minutes, the reading is 0.01
And finally, when the engine is off for 5 minutes the reading is 1.25

Could you explain what these readings mean? Im looking forward to hearing how this works!
 

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Something not right here. Try this:

1. The switch on your meter, in the off position, should be straight up and down pointing to the zero.
2. Insert black meter lead into center plug with white circle.
3. Insert red meter lead into right side plug.
4. Rotate switch counterclockwise three clicks so that it points to the 20.
5. Touch and hold red meter probe to positive battery post.
6. Touch and hold black meter probe to negative battery post.
7. Note what display says and post back.

Please ask ANY questions you may have or if anything is unclear.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Something not right here. Try this:

1. The switch on your meter, in the off position, should be straight up and down pointing to the zero.
2. Insert black meter lead into center plug with white circle.
3. Insert red meter lead into right side plug.
4. Rotate switch counterclockwise three clicks so that it points to the 20.
5. Touch and hold red meter probe to positive battery post.
6. Touch and hold black meter probe to negative battery post.
7. Note what display says and post back.

Please ask ANY questions you may have or if anything is unclear.
I will try again tonight. Is it odd that the reading was so high before I turned it on and dropped so low when the key was in the ignition? That struck me as a bit odd
 
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