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Discussion Starter #1
Well it has happened to me 2x in the past three weeks, where I am at a stop sign...on a slant...and getting ready to make a right turn when Bamm! She tips. In both cases, the bike sustained no damage, however my pride is left bruised as I panic to make sure no one saw me.

Now I realize that as a new rider, I will be making quite a few mistakes over the next few months, but this is by far my biggest fumbling. And as such, I am wondering if this happens to the best of them, or am I just making rookie mistakes when the bike isn't in a "full and upright position"?
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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rodent, this says rookie all the way. how long have you been riding bikes? I shouldnt be picking on you. am sure you feel bad nuff already. That 900, is it your first? kinda big for a beginers. doable, if you's a big fella. I always recommend used 250's to cut teeth on. thrash the hell outa em and then get a real bike,, er, mean bigger. just a 250 is so much fun to cut up on. by time yor tired of it, you got some real skills. and a used beat up 250 is 'bout same price as a newr one.

ok, so yor droppin yor baby..far too often. well boy, you aint payin too much 'tention to what she needs. keep her up like vertical all the time. dont be bendin her over till she got a good roll of speed under her. quit lookin at yerself in the shoppin windows an pay 'tention to what yor horse is tellin you. take good care of her n she will take good care of you.. what else did you need to hear? ponchout
 

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Well it has happened to me 2x in the past three weeks, where I am at a stop sign...on a slant...and getting ready to make a right turn when Bamm! She tips. In both cases, the bike sustained no damage, however my pride is left bruised as I panic to make sure no one saw me.

Now I realize that as a new rider, I will be making quite a few mistakes over the next few months, but this is by far my biggest fumbling. And as such, I am wondering if this happens to the best of them, or am I just making rookie mistakes when the bike isn't in a "full and upright position"?
it sounds like you need to spend a lot more time practicing in parking lots. The bike isn't that big but if you are dropping it when you are stopped, you don't really have the skills to maintain the bike at speeds. I'm not trying to be mean, but you asked. Spend some real time practicing in the parking lot. Have you taken a MSF course? If not, I really suggest that you do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
lol...thanks for the heads up.

I actually think I got my mistake...having written the topic. prob is turning the bars to the right in anticipation of the turn....looking left for traffic....and wind up with the bike canted and leaning...and me not focusing on the bike. result, she starts to tilt....and she is just a little too big to catch it.


So yah......I need to pay more attention at that time.


p.s. been riding now for just under 1 month.....but I couldnt think of a better bike bike to start with then the 900. She is such a joy! Well, when I am not cursing out the California DOT and there crappy highways.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
...I have taken the MSF course. Passed with flying colors. "so to speak". Granted, I am a little taken back by the assumption that I have not taken the class by my statements regarding an uphill stop prepping for a turn while feathering the clutch and looking the other way. That senario isnt something that is covered in the MSF course and is something that I will have to adjust to as a new rider "which I have said I was".

now looking back and analyzing the situation to properly state the situation is enough for me to identify my problem "preping for the turn rather then heading straight then turn". I dont know, I guess I was expecting someone to say "hey...your doing X wrong" rather then...Take the class....Buy a 250....Stick to he parking lots....or Stop looking at yourself in the mirror.

I am a rookie, but I am not an idiot. Pitty that the responses I have received shows that this is clearly not the place to "ask for assistance" from those who have far more experience in the subject then myself.7
 

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Hey Squirrel, don't take the guys so seriously....most everyone on this forum is out there trying to help out. I've been riding about 3 1/2 years now, with about 40,000 miles (I''m retired so I get a lot of seat time :))) big smile) but I still do the dumb right turn and almost lose it by gripping too hard at the last minute on the front brake, so just brush it off..... Most of these guys do the same thing even with a lot of experience, they just won't admit to it because of pride...... Spend some time in the parking lots making right turns and then hey, when (and I mean when) it happens again on the street, laugh it off and get back on and ride....... If your bike ends up 5 years now looking like it was brand new off the showroom floor, you have wasted your money and time missing all the fun that comes with riding in the wind......Walt E.
 

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As a newer rider you can drag your right foot a little more until you become a little more comfortable with the balance of the bike. I've switched styles of bikes a lot and when I move from my VX800(Upright) to the Vulcan I noticed a big difference in balance when going to the right and just dragged the right a little longer till I became comfortable with the the bikes handling.
 

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Squirrel,

My advice is to install an engine guard. It is probably useless in an actual crash. However, it will protect your bike from a simple tip due to uneven ground, tight spaces, momentary lapse of concentration, etc...By the way, a 900 probably makes a good 2d or even 3d bike. Take it slow. As has already been said, practice, practice, practice.....
 

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I'm with Poncho Villa, you should start with a small bike, that's what I did, rode a 250 for 18 months then a was ready for the 900, it is a $9K investment, but since it is too late for that I'm also with the comments from other members, work on your skills in a parking lot.
 

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No offence was intended. I never took the course but my wife did. They seemed to really but the folks through the paces. The one question I have for you is How big are you? My wife has had a simular problem but she is only 5ft. She has a hard time holding the bike up once it starts to go over. I have consitered ordering the "ride like a pro" video to see what kind of advice they offer. I have been riding for over 10 years and although I have been down once I have never dropped a bike at low speed. Spend some time on the road and have fun.
 

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prob is turning the bars to the right in anticipation of the turn....looking left for traffic....
You should be looking "into" the turn - not the other direction. Even if it's a slow turn. Verify that there is nothing coming, and then execute your turn. If you are even a little unsure that there isn't enough time to properly execute the turn due to cars coming, don't make the turn. I've actually had cars behind me honk at me because I didn't turn out into traffic fast enough for them. Screw 'em. They can wait and I'm not hurt. Also, Poncho is correct - I know that it sucks to hear it, but a 900 is too much bike for a new rider.

This is my fifth street bike. I've been riding dirt since I was about 9, and been on the street since about 17 (I'm 44 now). I just got back into riding street after not riding for more than a decade and I went with the 500 to get my "sea legs" back. Biggest bike I've ever owned was the '80 KZ1000 that I bought when I was 18 in '84. That damn thing was a beast :). Since March I've logged more than 7000 miles on the little 500. I plan to bump up to at least a 900 LT, but I'm really itching to get my butt into the saddle of a ZX-14. :eek:

You'll get better with time & miles.
 

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The MSF course is a good idea. Also when waiting to make a right from a stop, keep her straight up and down, don't start the lean till you are moving. The ride like a pro dvd series is great too. Good luck. We were all newbies once. Don't give up.
 

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just try to stay centered. When you stop before a turn. Look forward, don't look down.
The horizon even if you can't see it will keep you in balance. Don't turn before the bike is underway and then just look wher eyou want to go. the nbike wil follow.
Now after riding for 30 or more years. I was in the driveway the other day and thinking about what I forgot in the house, had just come back from around the block because I forgot whatever it was.
Well what I forgot was to put down the kickstand and by the time I realized that. it was too late and the bike was on the ground with my left foot stuck under the seat.
I crawled out. Lifted the bike with some effort, efer's heavy
looked to see if the wife or neighbors were looking.
Today I started driving out of the shed without unlocking the brake rotor lock.
Good job, fortunately I was just crawling forward. No harm done.
Last week. I drove out with the 30 foot cable i wrap around a tree and through the rear tire and frame still on the bike.
That was not pretty. Had to removed the caliper to get the wire out.
Did I feel stupid? YOU BET
Live and learn my friend, and then do it again, and again, and again.
So do you feel better now.
By the way. I aced every driving skill and written test on the driver class.
But the damb garage lock up wire thingy things just get me
 

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As has been said before, practice, practice, practice. I love my 9, but I almost got rid of it after a few weeks. It felt a lot different than my enduros or either of my 550s, especially in the turns. Even with 20+ years of riding and 10 different bikes, I still wander into empty parking lots and get some tight turn and low speed maneuvers in. I still weave between the dotted lines when it is safe to do so. Practice, practice, practice.
 

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...I have taken the MSF course. Passed with flying colors. "so to speak". Granted, I am a little taken back by the assumption that I have not taken the class by my statements regarding an uphill stop prepping for a turn while feathering the clutch and looking the other way. That senario isnt something that is covered in the MSF course and is something that I will have to adjust to as a new rider "which I have said I was".

now looking back and analyzing the situation to properly state the situation is enough for me to identify my problem "preping for the turn rather then heading straight then turn". I dont know, I guess I was expecting someone to say "hey...your doing X wrong" rather then...Take the class....Buy a 250....Stick to he parking lots....or Stop looking at yourself in the mirror.

I am a rookie, but I am not an idiot. Pitty that the responses I have received shows that this is clearly not the place to "ask for assistance" from those who have far more experience in the subject then myself.7
Don't get offended brother. You gave a certain amount of info and we gave suggestions based on that. Obviously, we didn't know you have taken the MSF. I rode dirt bikes when I was a kid. I started riding street bikes in 06. I started on a Honda CM400T, with a whopping 395 cc's of fury. I then switched to a zx-6r and then the 900. Do you know what I still do from time to time? I go into a parking lot and make the tightest turns I can. I 'panic' stop as much as possible. I do some imaginary slolem.

No matter how good you think you are, you can get better. I would never give you a suggestion I haven't taken into account for myself.

You said:
Now I realize that as a new rider, I will be making quite a few mistakes over the next few months, but this is by far my biggest fumbling. And as such, I am wondering if this happens to the best of them, or am I just making rookie mistakes when the bike isn't in a "full and upright position"?
and the only suggestion I can give you is to get more time on your bike and get comfortable with your bike. There is nothing you can do to practice everything, in every situation. But practice will equal confidence.

We are not trying to dog on you or make you feel bad, but you asked a question and advice from more experienced riders. That's what you got. Remember this is the internet and all we have is what you tell us. And remember, this is the internet, take everything with a grain of salt. Don't get offended, we are here to help, but our inflection doesn't come through in typed word...

I hope you choose to stay around, learn a lot, laugh a lot, and enjoy the hell out of your 900.

Hayes
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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I'm with Poncho Villa, you should start with a small bike, that's what I did, rode a 250 for 18 months then a was ready for the 900, it is a $9K investment, but since it is too late for that I'm also with the comments from other members, work on your skills in a parking lot.
the problem with reading text is you cant really see/tell what inflections the writer is (not) sending. If it were a live conversation with your buds (we are) taking the remarks / ribbing would be more... less painful. is why they invent all these stoopid smileys:beer:(my fav)

back to the subject. A used 250 goes for $1k. it makes a great thrashing machine to learn the basics (see MSF) and your confidence will SOAR as you beat the living hell outa it. Then because its a honda and it wont ever die, you can sell it for.... $1k.
So even if you still have a $9k bike sitting in the g'rage waiting for the big weekend ride, You can still get your yaya's out and constantly test and improve your hand/eye/foot/brain coordination.

I know this sounds ridiculous. I would/will buy one of these toys just for kicks and all my little friends can attempt to destroy it and leave my real.. big'r bikes alone.(insert smiley here):beer: ponchout
 

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I don't care what anybody says. The 900 ain't too big for beginners. Seriously, if you got the cajones, you could start on a V2K. You just gotta be smart and take precautions and lots of practice. Sure I had a 500cc bike 35 years ago, so I ain't a virgin. And the MSF course is required here in Texas, so I got to putt around on a 250 for 2 days. But I went for the Big Hoss V2K and I sure as hell don't regret it! I took my time practicing in parking lots and taking short rides around the neighborhood. I took it real easy for 2 months before I got out and went on any long rides in busy traffic. After 6 months and about 4k miles I got pretty comfortable on the Beast. Yes, I dropped it once, going slow, lost my balance on a steep hill in a hard turn. No damage. I got back on and kept going. Take that doggie by the horns and go for it!

Later...
 

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Been riding just shy of 40 years, and I don't consider myself a pro, but I do have a few miles under me. From my experience, I can say this, that the MSF course is good, but really only teaches you the basic mechanics of operating a motorcycle. When you're done with it, you have learned to start the bike, shift it, ride up to an eyeball popping 20 mph (maybe) and brake, along with some basic maneuvering around cones and swerving. The problem is, it doesn't teach you how to ride, and you can only do that by getting out and riding, plain and simple. So it just takes experience, finding out what works and what doesn't.

Engine size doesn't really matter that much unless you are so small and light that the 900 is completely overwhelming. It takes practice and getting used to the machine. I've read the comments here, and I have to agree with most of them, and I wouldn't take any of them as bashing you. I think they are sincerely meant to help. Everyone has their own opinion. Grab the stuff that you think may work for you and ignore the rest that won't. They're good folks on this board.

So, go out and practice your stuff. One thing I would echo, and that is the importance of keeping your horizon level. Don't look at the ground in front of you, keep your vision focused out a ways so you know what you'll be riding over before you get there. Also, there is a saying that goes, "You go where you look." If you look to the left while making a right turn, well, you get the picture. If you are looking down when you go to take off from a stop, guess where you will be headed! Enjoy your new bike. It's a great machine, and very capable. It's what my wife rides and I like riding it, too. Don't be discouraged. In due time, you will no longer be a rookie rider and will be passing on sage advice to other newbies.
 

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I've got 2 questions for ya...

1) How big a boy are ya? :D That info might help with tips/tricks.

2) Do ya put both feet down when at a stop?

The first question might answer a lot, if you're standin' on your tippy-toes to hold the bike up at a stop. That would tend to suggest a few trips to the gym to strengthen up the calves and such so that you've got a bit more strength in the area of your leg you're relying on for leverage.

The 2nd question (and there will be arguments, I'm sure) is just common sense. Some people say only put 1 foot down and be ready to go at all times if you see someone speedin' up on your backside. Personally, though, I find it MUCH easier to balance the bike when lookin' around while I have BOTH feet on the ground, and I've found that I can take off just as fast (definitely more comfortably) with both feet down as those with only 1 foot down. And, if ya think about it, 1 foot down and 1 foot up tends to throw your balance off center already, so you end up fighting to correct that on a turn from the start, especially as a newer rider.

Then, overall, I suggest... if you're coming up to a right turn on a hill, stay back a bit. Don't start the lean, or the turn, until you've got forward momentum to help with the balance of the bike, and like many have said. Practice, practice, practice... and when you're done with that, practice! Find a nice large parking lot (the larger schools and churches here actually have mini-roadways) and practice. It's not the long straightaways and gentle curves that will build your experience, but rather the tight turns, slow speed maneuvers, figure eights, emergency braking and the like that will make the rest easier and more enjoyable. A 250 does make a great practice bike, but the 9'er will do ya well too... with practice. :)

(P.S. Don't take the ribbing as personal insult. We consider ourselves family here, and it's all good natured fun, just like you'd expect. Ponch especially... the man knows his biz'ness!)
 
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