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Discussion Starter #1
So just out of curiosity...and figuring I've moved to Colorado...how much in a change in altitude does it take for a CARBED bike to start acting up because the A/F mix isn't keeping up? Denver has an altitude of a little over 5200' but you can ride the Rockies up to a point where it's 11,400' which would seem like a HUGE change for a carb. With that in mind can you jet accordingly to find a happy medium or is it to much of a stretch to equal out? Obviously I'll be riding in the Denver elevation more often than the high altitude, do I even worry about it and just ride?
 

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I may be backwards in my thinking, some may say definetly, but as altitude increases, I think the air gets thinner so less oxygen = a richer mixture. Your gas mileage may decrease some at the higher altitude, but I dout you'll harm the motor any. It may tend to load up if you dont let it wild out a little bit. Your cold starts may be easier and require less choke.
 

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I rode my carbed bike out that way and through the Rockies with no issues . . . You may have noticed the octane offered is lower, here where regular is 87 octane, there its 85 - If I recall, when I asked about that - the explanation given was because of the altitude. The best thing to do is ride it and see how it feels, if you notice anything, talk to other bikers and dealers out there and see what they recommend.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sounds good guys, I just don't want to burn the motor up by leaning it wayyyyy beyond what it would like or making it to rich to even perform right. Thanks for the input!!
 

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You'll get richer, not leaner. Carbed piston airplanes have a mixture control in the cockpit that pilots use to lean things out. It starts out at 'full rich' for takeoff (unless they are taking off at a high altitude), then the pilot leans the mixture as he/she climbs the aircraft.

It is possible for it to get really sloppy rich and not run well. A guy I've ridden with a few times claims his Yamaha needed to be adjusted in the rockies because it just wouldn't run right, stalling, no power, etc. Of course we're here at 600' of elevation. So that's a tremendous difference in elevation.

If it were ME, I'd make myself familiar with how to make those adjustments and take the requisite tools along with me. Chances are you'll be fine; obviously you won't be running at 'peak' but you won't hurt anything. But it wouldn't hurt to be prepared.
 

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Depends on where your engine is jetted NOW.

Most are a little on the lean side, so the altitude change may not bother it much.
If it is rich now, going up in altitude might cause some blubbering.
 
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