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VRAC Nation President, BOTM Winner Sept. 2013 & No
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I have a 2010 Vulcan 900 Custom and would love to learn how to do all my own maintenance any suggested videos a gal can watch to learn this stuff?
 

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Highly recommend buying a manual, Clymer is a popular choise, but Haynes or a factory manual will help. The factory manual will most likely assume you already have a general idea of what your doing, were the other 2 are for more basic kowledge with more detail into the how to area. The factory version will tell you what to do, were the othes may tell you to seek the service department.
 

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I agree with Rick, at least to a point. If you have only limited mechanical expertise, then the aftermarket manuals will probably take you as far as you would want to know. If your mechanical abilities and powers of comprehension are a bit further advanced, you won't be happy with anything less than the factory book.
 

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If you do get a manual, I know it sounds weird but, study your manual before you decide to do any work to your bike. Some manuals, including the Kawasaki Service manual for my V2K will have you jumping back and forth between sections. For example if you need to change your battery (this is not advice because I don't know how to access it in your 900) you would go to the electronic sections and you will find the directions. It will say something similar to "Remove your seat as outlined in section 2.3" then "remove side panel as outlined in 4.2". then it will start to give you directions starting at your battery box.

They can be annoying at first but after you learn the set up of the book and the basic steps of the normally removed parts it will get A LOT EASIER to use.
 

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I agree with Rick, at least to a point. If you have only limited mechanical expertise, then the aftermarket manuals will probably take you as far as you would want to know. If your mechanical abilities and powers of comprehension are a bit further advanced, you won't be happy with anything less than the factory book.
+1 on that. you slipped this in as I was typing mine. That is good advise. It don't hurt to push your level of comfort a bit but if you want to make a mechanic mad, take half of a bike, a box full of parts, and say "Fix This". Boy are you going to pay for it. :D.

And I am one of those people that want the factory manual. Nothing I hate worse than following the steps and then running in to, "if you still don't find a problem, contact a professional". AHHH I HATE THAT.
 

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I realize this thread is a month old, but thought I would chime in.

1) Buy a lift. 60 bucks from Harbor Freight (if you use coupon). This is the best thing you can do.

2) Never ever hesitate to ask advice/help. I think at one point, it seemed like half the threads in the V2K section were my "how do I..." questions.

3) Don't ever be embarrassed asking for help. The only embarrassment should be if you screw something up cause you didn't ask....

If I can post about the following... well, read the entire think and you will understand.

http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=23883


Wrench away!
 

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3) Don't ever be embarrassed asking for help. The only embarrassment should be if you screw something up cause you didn't ask....
I'll be coming here for help :eek:
 

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I realize this thread is a month old, but thought I would chime in.

1) Buy a lift. 60 bucks from Harbor Freight (if you use coupon). This is the best thing you can do.

2) Never ever hesitate to ask advice/help. I think at one point, it seemed like half the threads in the V2K section were my "how do I..." questions.

3) Don't ever be embarrassed asking for help. The only embarrassment should be if you screw something up cause you didn't ask....

If I can post about the following... well, read the entire think and you will understand.

http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=23883


Wrench away!
Totally agree. We've all been noobs at one point. Along with some digging, and hands on, you'll start giving tips of your own. Don't get frustrated the first few times, you can always ask for advice. When you get done by yourself, the next best feeling to riding, is your accomplishment and acquired knowledge. :)
 

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As other have suggested, get a manual! I got mine (in pdf) off e-bay for $20 I think. When it comes to maintenance, really not much to it. I'm sure there are some videos out there, but for things like oil changes, really easy to figure out. Plus, if you get stuck, a quick post on this forum usually points you in the right direction within MINUTES! Folks on here are friendly and always willing to give some advice!

My biggest piece of advice is to have the proper tools! I can't tell you how many times I have seen friends work on their bikes and pull out VICE GRIPS or Channel Locks to loosen/tighten a bolt or nut!!:eek:

Now, they all come over to my house and let me do the work for them:rolleyes:
 

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As other have suggested, get a manual! I got mine (in pdf) off e-bay for $20 I think. When it comes to maintenance, really not much to it. I'm sure there are some videos out there, but for things like oil changes, really easy to figure out. Plus, if you get stuck, a quick post on this forum usually points you in the right direction within MINUTES! Folks on here are friendly and always willing to give some advice!

My biggest piece of advice is to have the proper tools! I can't tell you how many times I have seen friends work on their bikes and pull out VICE GRIPS or Channel Locks to loosen/tighten a bolt or nut!!:eek:

Now, they all come over to my house and let me do the work for them:rolleyes:
A big +1 on that. There are some things you can skimp by on and there are others not too. Tools is not one of them. You can start small and work your way up to a nice collection of tools if you buy them as you need them. A good ratchet and socket set will be used the most. Then work your way up from there. Buying tools will save you money in the long run if you decide to take doing your own maintenance serious.
 

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A big +1 on that. There are some things you can skimp by on and there are others not too. Tools is not one of them. You can start small and work your way up to a nice collection of tools if you buy them as you need them. A good ratchet and socket set will be used the most. Then work your way up from there. Buying tools will save you money in the long run if you decide to take doing your own maintenance serious.
+2!! Depending on how deep you want to get into your own maintenance, I would suggest the following:

1. A good quality, complete socket set (metric and imperial).
2. Some metric wrenches (you can determine what you will need by looking around your bike, and fitting some of the sockets on the nuts/bolts)
3. An oil pan to drain your oil into
4. A belt tension guage such as this one:
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/14/71/995/33638/ITEM/Motion-Pro-Belt-Tension-Gauge.aspx
5. Always keep some rags around!!!!!
6. Tire gauge
7. Spark plug socket
8. Feeler gauges (for gapping spark plugs)
9. Good quality screw drivers (nothing worse than stripping a bolt/screw head with a cheap or wrong sized screw driver!)
10. For those moments when nothing else seems to fit, an adjustable
11. Pliers (various kinds) 'cause you never know!
12. Vice grips 'cause you never know!
13. A selection of zip ties and electrical tape
14. An oil filter wrench

I think that is about it.

Anyone else have any to add to the list?

There is nothing more satisfying (except the ride itself) of doing your own maintenance!
 

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A good set of torx head bits and Allen wrenches. Torx bits work good for getting the stripped allen bolts.

Next time you buy something that comes in a big cardboard box, keep it. If you have to work in the driveway or gravel floor car port (like I do) you knees will thank you.
 

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As other have suggested, get a manual! I got mine (in pdf) off e-bay for $20 I think. When it comes to maintenance, really not much to it. I'm sure there are some videos out there, but for things like oil changes, really easy to figure out. Plus, if you get stuck, a quick post on this forum usually points you in the right direction within MINUTES! Folks on here are friendly and always willing to give some advice!

My biggest piece of advice is to have the proper tools! I can't tell you how many times I have seen friends work on their bikes and pull out VICE GRIPS or Channel Locks to loosen/tighten a bolt or nut!!:eek:

Now, they all come over to my house and let me do the work for them:rolleyes:
I hope they at least buy you a case of beer or pizza for your time. ;-)
 

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I hope they at least buy you a case of beer or pizza for your time. ;-)
I can usually manage to coax a free beer or two out of them!

The big thing with me, is that along with preaching the need for quality tools on here, I preach it to them too. I have a friend who now does all of his opwn, and another without any space to work on his bike, and no tools, but at least now when he comes over he does the work himself (with my tools and guidance, of course)!
 

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The other thing with me is that I find working on all things mechanical is almost as much fun as riding!
as long as it is not a HAVE to situation. I enjoying working on things. But when my daily driver breaks down and I NEED to get it back going. Then the frustrations come out and I start getting hateful. During those times I tend to work alone :eek:.
 

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I can usually manage to coax a free beer or two out of them!

The big thing with me, is that along with preaching the need for quality tools on here, I preach it to them too. I have a friend who now does all of his opwn, and another without any space to work on his bike, and no tools, but at least now when he comes over he does the work himself (with my tools and guidance, of course)!
I have a friend like you as well. I used to have a garage (with a house), but after moving into a condo, it's not so easy for me to work on my bike. But I do have a friend who's a bike enthusiast as well, with his own garage and tools, so whenever I have to work on my bike, I go over to his place. We make a guys day of it. Helping each other out on our bikes, relaxing with a couple of brews, and his wife makes us lunch. Then off we go for a several hours riding. No DUI though. ;-)
 

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Cockroach, some real good advice on this thread. Basic mtnc such as changing fluids and brakes is not rocket science,and I remember from BOTM last month(cool paint job by the way)Your bike sitting in a garage so you probably have access to basic tools. You Tube, A factory shop manual, and a good lift should be all you will need.
 
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