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Discussion Starter #1
This bike had 1700 miles on it when I bought it 4/2012. It now has around 6500 on it. I figure before long I will need new tires and believe this would be a good time to have the shop do general maintenance.

This bike is running flawlessly... no complaints from me. I'll throw this at you and you guys tell what to add or what not to worry about right now. I do the oil changes.

Coolant check flushed/replaced if needed
Valve check and adjusted
Brake fluid flush and replaced and adjusted
Clutch same if needed
Spark plug check
Hoses and wiring inspected
All bolts/screws checked
Battery and stator inspected
 

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Short version:
I would give the plugs, other lines a look over, change oil, possibly brakes and forget the rest.

Long Version:
I have always treated my Kawasaki's like Cars. If it isn't broke don't fix it. But I do change my fluids from time to time. You can get hand operated vacuum pump from harbor freight for probably 25-30 bucks and do your own brakes. It is easy. Or you can pump brakes, open bleeder, close bleeder, and repeat method with a hose on the end of our bleeder valve. Keep an eye on your fluid to make sure you don't get too low. Just top it off as you pump. When the fluid comes out clean, your done.

I thought the 900's had hydraulic valves so there is not adjustment.

If you feel frogy you can do your own tires, I do but I like saving the money and getting to know my bikes and everything that has been done.

I never mess with the clutch except the slack in the lever unless it is slipping. but yours has hydraulic clutch?

Plugs should be ok if bike is running ok (if it is still factory). Never hurts to look.

I usually keep a decent eye on the shape of the break and water lines to notice if there is any cracking or damage but all the dealer usulay dose is look as see if its cracked and charge you shop time for it.

It's not a Harley, it probably won't shake any bolts loose.

If you are getting 13.5-14 volts back to your battery when your running you are good. Rev it up with a meter on it to make sure the regulator is doing is job and not frying you battery. But usualy you will notice your seat getting hot because the battery is getting hot if there is a problem there unless you are not getting any charge.

Make sure you have enough coolant and that it is not dirty and go on.
 

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oh and your drive belt. I like to keep an eye on mine but I also got a rock caught in mine and I have a good size scar around mine.
 

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The valves do not have hydraulic adjusters. They are adjusted by replacing shims.
Thanks for the info. Did not know that.
 

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I might start thinking about checking them at around 12,000 miles or so.
That is about the interval I would have suggested. Most bikes that I have had recommended it anywhere from 10k to 15K. My 1100 Vstar was every 10k.
 

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I change fluids yearly. (Coolant, brakes) and do oil changes at around 5k. That might be a little more frequent than is necessary, but that's what I do! I ride a lot though, since I commute on my bike as well.

If the valve adjustment wasn't done at the 600 mile service interval I'd look into getting those done pretty quick. If they were, sometime around 12k! (I believe 12k is the interval suggested in the owners manual)
 

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I change fluids yearly. (Coolant, brakes) and do oil changes at around 5k. That might be a little more frequent than is necessary, but that's what I do! I ride a lot though, since I commute on my bike as well.

If the valve adjustment wasn't done at the 600 mile service interval I'd look into getting those done pretty quick. If they were, sometime around 12k! (I believe 12k is the interval suggested in the owners manual)
Where is it recommended to check them at 600 miles? The service manual only wants them checked every 15,000 miles.
 

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Good to know!! Thanks for the info. I was wondering, are there any bolts that should be torked as routine maintenance? My bike has 3500mi. I changed the oil at 500 and 3000. Haven't been back to the dealer, and don't plan to go back!! If it aint broke don't fix it?
 

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Where is it recommended to check them at 600 miles? The service manual only wants them checked every 15,000 miles.
Whoops. No, sorry, I'm on Honda mode. Disregard! My Wife's Shadow recommends it done at 600 miles and then every 12k after that. :D

Kinda wish we had valves like those Hondas. Just get the valve covers off and turn the crank, then twist the top of the valve with needle nose pliers until they are in the right spot!
 

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Good to know!! Thanks for the info. I was wondering, are there any bolts that should be torked as routine maintenance? My bike has 3500mi. I changed the oil at 500 and 3000. Haven't been back to the dealer, and don't plan to go back!! If it aint broke don't fix it?
I'd check the torque on most of the front wheel attachment points, as this is where most of the dealer assembly takes place. Forks are already installed, so I'd look at the wheel, brake caliper, handlebars, etc..
Once the torque is checked, they probably don't need much further inspections- maybe annually.
Also, occasionally check the exhaust header nuts at the cylinder head.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My concern is due to the fact this is a 2007, previously not ridden much, and 2012 is almost over. I've begun to think that all of the fluids should be changed not just oil.

I don't know how long I'll have it but want to care for as if I will always have it.

I went with a friend recently to a local Got Gear dealership and was amazed at the bikes they had.

I am pretty naive when it comes to bikes and do not intend to do much more than general maintenance that I feel comfortable doing. I recently did a very minor adjustment on clutch. Everything else feels pretty good except the seat. I am going to see if I can find someone local that could possibly make it a little more comfortable until I can get a better 2-up seat.

I'm a little disappointed that they did not chrome front and back rims. I may consider this before new tires are added.

I forgot to add on my original list to have the belt tension checked as well as for any unusual wear on it.

I'm getting some squeaking from back brake but not too concerned right now.
 

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If you have the stock seat, there's a sticker on the bottom that shows "before you ride" checks. It's a good starting point
 

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My concern is due to the fact this is a 2007, previously not ridden much, and 2012 is almost over. I've begun to think that all of the fluids should be changed not just oil.

I don't know how long I'll have it but want to care for as if I will always have it.

I went with a friend recently to a local Got Gear dealership and was amazed at the bikes they had.

I am pretty naive when it comes to bikes and do not intend to do much more than general maintenance that I feel comfortable doing. I recently did a very minor adjustment on clutch. Everything else feels pretty good except the seat. I am going to see if I can find someone local that could possibly make it a little more comfortable until I can get a better 2-up seat.

I'm a little disappointed that they did not chrome front and back rims. I may consider this before new tires are added.

I forgot to add on my original list to have the belt tension checked as well as for any unusual wear on it.

I'm getting some squeaking from back brake but not too concerned right now.
I'd definitely bleed the brakes, both front and rear. (It's easy, and if you have a partner it can be done super easy with no special tools). I'd also change the coolant. Both fluids break down over time and become less effective, can cause corrosion, etc. Make sure to use distilled water with your coolant as opposed to tap water (or just use 50/50 pre-mix).

And of course, change the oil, buy a service manual and go through and check torque specs on the front end especially. Check your brake pads too, you may need some new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you have the stock seat, there's a sticker on the bottom that shows "before you ride" checks. It's a good starting point
I did not know this! I always do a check... turn the key, hear a noise, hit the black go button, and go.

I promise, if I were a pilot, I would do a little more. :D

I don't believe I'm very different that many of you. I want a dependable product. When I want something to perform for me, especially after investing money, elbow grease, and research, it had better perform.

I'm tickled to death to be able to hear those pipes rumble and know that I don't have to wait for warming up. The fun begins when I turn the throttle.

If something were to go wrong and my 900 had to sit for several days, I would go nuts.

It's meant to ride not sit. If it were to have a mechanical problem, I would not rest until I could get it fixed. If this were impossible, I'd get rid of it and get another bike that was fixable.

I'm hooked on riding not necessarily on the bike although the 900 is a fine ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'd definitely bleed the brakes, both front and rear. (It's easy, and if you have a partner it can be done super easy with no special tools). I'd also change the coolant. Both fluids break down over time and become less effective, can cause corrosion, etc. Make sure to use distilled water with your coolant as opposed to tap water (or just use 50/50 pre-mix).

And of course, change the oil, buy a service manual and go through and check torque specs on the front end especially. Check your brake pads too, you may need some new ones.
Don't tell me something is easy!!! :( I figure out a way to mess it up.

I have a neighbor who can mechanically fix anything that goes wrong with my 94 Accord. I've paid him alot over the past few years for his expertise and he has kept it running. I'm sure I could do some of this stuff but will make a list, see what the bike shop says it will cost, and take it from there.

I changed out the damaged throttle on the Honda 750 I used to have. I almost broke it trying to get it on there but I did it.

Clint E said it best...

"A man's got to know his limitations!" :D
 

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I did not know this! I always do a check... turn the key, hear a noise, hit the black go button, and go.

I promise, if I were a pilot, I would do a little more. :D

I don't believe I'm very different that many of you. I want a dependable product. When I want something to perform for me, especially after investing money, elbow grease, and research, it had better perform.

I'm tickled to death to be able to hear those pipes rumble and know that I don't have to wait for warming up. The fun begins when I turn the throttle.

If something were to go wrong and my 900 had to sit for several days, I would go nuts.

It's meant to ride not sit. If it were to have a mechanical problem, I would not rest until I could get it fixed. If this were impossible, I'd get rid of it and get another bike that was fixable.

I'm hooked on riding not necessarily on the bike although the 900 is a fine ride.
Could not agree more. My V2K is no show piece, its a means of transportation. You do not wash your car every time you drive it. As long as it is not raining when I leave for work I ride it. I feel some people get a little carried away with maintenance. Not saying I neglect mine but I do not spend an hour checking things before I leave the house either. Tires are round, no wet spots under the bike, brakes feel good, weee tick a tick weee (FI system), black button, and take off.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I know this may sound a little crazy but I imagine with the technology we have and constantly improving on, there could very well come a time where the "owners" will not have to do any maintenance whatsoever.

Of course none of us could afford such a contraption!

Trains without wheels running on a little electric juice hovering about a 1/2 inch above a magnetic charge.

Why do parts have to even touch to make them move... why oil or grease?

Long haulers use compressed air to slow or stop their trucks.
 
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