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I have heard the tires can get flat spots if you don't. Either I got lucky and my tires didn't or I either couldn't tell or the flat spots fixed themselves.
 

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This might have been true back in the 50s or 60s but with newer technology tires I doubt it happens now. I've got a 95 Firebird siting in my garage, essentially retired from service. I'm not concerned about flat spots on it.
 

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They bounce back - a tire is made of rubber!
It will not keep the shape it makes when its flat why would it over the winter??? Its rubber - it flexes
 

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I think the owners manual says to let some air out for storage but nothing about raising it up. You would think letting air out would create more of a flat spot so i guess it's not a problem. This is all from memory so fact check me.
 

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From what I have read, if you don't raise them up, you at least want to have something between the concrete and the tire. I myself got a bunch of anti-fatigue rubber mats from Harbor Freight, and have those under 4 motorcycles right now in my garage, and will have a 5th, once it is repaired.
 

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These modern tires, not so much.

It wouldn't be a terrible idea to move it a bit every month or so. However, you're actually better off to NOT start the engine.

If you can ride it; ride it. That's great for it. But starting it and idling it, even for 15+ minutes, will not likely get the engine oil warm enough for long enough to boil off any moisture. And when the oil cools, it will eventually cool to a point that it produces condensation. That condensation is of course moisture, and it'll seep down into the oil.

Once or twice or even three times won't hurt anything. But some people have a habit of starting and idling their bikes in the winter for some reason, and will do it several times throughout the winter. Each time, while they are getting the oil up and circulating through the engine; they're also adding moisture into the oil every single time they do it. (When you ride it, it gets hot enough, and stays hot long enough, that that moisture all burns off).

I'm also not convinced getting the oil circulating is beneficial. The oil will run down leaving parts unprotected; but they're just as unprotected after 4 weeks as 3 months. Corrosion could be a concern; perhaps. But not likely an issue over a winter, or even storing for a year. Basically, if you start it every couple of weeks; you're increasing the number of times the engine is started with certain components unprotected. Instead of just firing it up in the spring and riding it, which means the engine only has to do that once.

So, if it makes you feel better; move it now and then. But don't start it except to ride it!
 

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I block mine up to take some load off the tires and suspension, but I don't et them off the ground and in 38 yrs I've never had flat spots.
 

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Storage????
 

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Some of what Romans said makes sense but I still run mine. The idea being to get the SeaFoam laced gasoline running through the carb. I'll start mine up every three weeks or so and run it for maybe 20ish minutes. Its water cooled so it won't overheat. I'll also ride it back and forth on the driveway a few times to get the clutch operating.

As far as putting something between the tires and the cement, yes, I do that with the Firebird which doesn't move. Its on a nice, thick plastic sheet. But the motorcycles, no since I run them and "ride" them (even if it is only around on the driveway) every 3 weeks or so.

No, you don't need to be concerned about lifting the thing off the ground.
 
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