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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK,

Since I hadn't seen anyone post anything like this, here is what I did to get my simple Lift Master Garage Door opener to trigger off me flashing my High Beams as I approach. I really didn't want to wire another switch on my bike, and didn't want to make any permanent changes to my controls/handle bars. I wanted something stock looking and hopefully using something already existing. I suddenly thought, "Hey, why not just use my already existing Hi Beam switch". But you don't want that sending a continuous broad cast of the door opener, so just a quick pulse when you first turn the high beams on to trigger the door opener was what I wanted. Got my trusty HP-48c calculator out and targeted the pulse time I wanted, and how much steady state current I was fine with it using (when Hi Beam is on).

Just crack open your existing door opener remote and rip out the PCB guts of it if you have an available spare, OR go buy a $10 compatible one for your door opener. Make sure it is 3.3v based, and most of these are "triggered high". I could probably show you how a GND trigger could work too, but this represents the bulk of the door openers I've seen (I used Lift Master). If your garage opener is a learning one, it should work with pretty much any door opener remote.

Here is an example of it working

Hopefully, it helps some of you if you have even a little soldering knowledge. I love this. I wrap it in a sealed sandwich baggie, and just tape it inside the cowling or head light housing, and it has pretty good range (150 yards away). I could have designed one that took power supply too, but I didn't want a 3-wire install, and you don't always have a constant 3v source. So, this just requires the original 3.3v door opener battery, and you will have to change it out, like every 5 years, but that is easy. I used the head light plug as my tap point on the HIGH BEAM side, just because that felt like the ideal point. Essentially, every time you engage the hi beam, it will create a short 2 second pulse on the garage door opener for a 3v signal to trigger it to operate. If you leave the hi beam on, no worries, it is only drawing 0.1mA while on and not producing any more pulses (nearly 0v). Make sure your garage door opener is 3.3v based, and triggered hi (you can tell, by measuring the voltage on both sides of the small momentary push button on the opener. One will be GND and the other side will be 3.3v when open. Which ever side changes (it should be the GND side) when you push the button is what you solder the diode output to and then connect any other TRUE ground side of the PCB (hopefully coming right off the small watch battery holder) to the middle of the two 10k resistors. Wire up a connector (I used RC plane extension servo leads) to your head light, and you are good to go. I will assume you've already "bound" the door opener to your garage door before doing this.

Just to be clear, you are ONLY making the pulse circuit in the center. The part on the left and right is just to show you what basically already exists (motorcycle head light on left and Garage remote PCB on right). Connect to it however you like but there are 2 inputs (motorcycle ground and the 12v hi beam tap) and 2 outputs (remote switch side and remote ground) to the circuit. Note, you are NOT shorting motorcycle GND to PCB ground!!!

This burns NO current when HI beam is off or when bike is off (even with high beam switch on) and there is only normal standby current demand on the remote battery (very very very small). While the bike IS running and Hi Beam is ON, it will burn about 0.6mA from your bike to begin with, but within 2 seconds, that will dissipate to <0.1mA. Essentially next to nothing compared to your head light. Originally, on my implementation, I didn't have the 20k output current limiting resistor or the 3.3v zenner diode, which without, yes, it produces a short time that is a little over 4.5v on the PCB remote input. Put them in, if you like. I didn't bother and it should not burn out the remote opener chip/battery. Also, the PCB diagram is just a quickie representational diagram to give you a good idea what to connect to...

I take NO RESPONSIBILITY for you damaging your opener or bike...this is reference only and like most DIY, at your own risk!!!

BR,

Jeff
 

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I had to replace my opener I had installed like 15 years ago. It had the openers that were the size of bricks. The new one came with these little mini ones about the size of a 50 cent piece.. I hid it just under the tank on the left side. works great.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Whewww jeff,just push on my pouch on my fairing, have my opener facing me,perfect
your invention is way over my head,But I like
LoL...yeah, that would work too, I guess. But how do you write a long DIY and spend all day in the garage about putting your remote in a pouch? grin. I guess you just spend the 5 minutes doing it, then sit back and drink some beers. :)
 

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I know this is now an old thread, but I wanted to say that I really appreciated your directions on how to recreate this setup. I built my own circuit based on your schematic and a pocket garage door opener ( [ame]https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07FZR65DC[/ame] ). This garage door opener had GPIO pins that were high and needed to be pulled low, so your circuit wasn't a perfect match here. I omitted the 20k resistor and replaced the 3.3v zener diode with a 5.3v zener diode, which I tied to an optocoupler that was then connected to the remote's switch leads.

I'm happy to say that after two failed prototypes, the third works like a charm. Most of the issues I had were around figuring out how to actually wire the resistors, diodes, and capacitor to each other without a board to function as the base. In the end, I had to take my time and shrink wrap each individual junction to keep them from shorting out. Here's a photo gallery, including a short video of the opener in action: https://photos.app.goo.gl/TPPttYhbQz9azax48
 

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Or here's any easier way to do it.
Get a spare opener, because you'll have to make changes to it
Pop open the opener and solder a wire across the switch that is used to open the door.
Remove battery and solder wires onto where the battery contacts are. You'll need at least 3-4 feet of wire.
Drill a hole in opener for the wires to exit.
Find a spot to place the opener. I put if under the seat.
Run wires up to the front.

I traced the headlight wiring to a connector that disconnects the handlebar left side controls.
The negative from the opener goes to either frame or battery negative.
The positive from the opener to the wire that is the high beams.
without cutting the wire I carefully striped the insulation away and soldered the positive wire onto there and used electrical tape to cover it.

Now when I get home I just flash the high beams and the door opens.
This works because if the switch on your opener is held down and power is applied the opener it will signal the door to open. Also closes the door.
 

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Or here's any easier way to do it.
Get a spare opener, because you'll have to make changes to it
Pop open the opener and solder a wire across the switch that is used to open the door.
Remove battery and solder wires onto where the battery contacts are. You'll need at least 3-4 feet of wire.
Drill a hole in opener for the wires to exit.
Find a spot to place the opener. I put if under the seat.
Run wires up to the front.

I traced the headlight wiring to a connector that disconnects the handlebar left side controls.
The negative from the opener goes to either frame or battery negative.
The positive from the opener to the wire that is the high beams.
without cutting the wire I carefully striped the insulation away and soldered the positive wire onto there and used electrical tape to cover it.

Now when I get home I just flash the high beams and the door opens.
This works because if the switch on your opener is held down and power is applied the opener it will signal the door to open. Also closes the door.
Most garage door openers run on 3.3v, not 12v. If you put 12v into the battery contacts on just about any battery operated garage door opener, you're gonna let the magic blue smoke escape.

Additionally, the whole purpose of this circuit is to turn a constant 12v signal into a short 3.3v pulse, just enough to activate the garage door opener just like you had pressed the button a single time and released it. I wanted to actually be able to use my high beams, and this allows me to leave them on as long as I want, only triggering the garage door a single time, for about 2 seconds, when I flip from low beams to high beams.
 

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Well my opener runs on 12v. Yep a small battery that is a 12v battery. My outside keypad uses the same 12v battery.
A simple voltage divider can be used to bring the voltage down to whatever is needed.
And it does run the door whenever I want it to when I put the headlight on high beam.
Even if I keep them on high beam it wont change the door movement. Its only the transition of the power being applied that makes the door move.
And if you switch to high and the door is going down, and you switch to low beam, and then switch to high again, the door will reverse.

On mine the door switch on the opener is always "pushed". And its the power that is applied by the high beams.

Try is on an opener.
Remove the battery,
hold the switch in and replace the battery,
the door will activate.
And even if you hold the switch in the door will act correctly.
 

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Interesting. I've never personally seen an opener that works on 12v. I stand corrected!

Different strokes circuits for different folks, eh?
 

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My opener also works on 3 volts so i purchased a small little gizmo on amazon or eBay for a few bucks. It is much smaller than the opener and is very simple to hook up, 12 volts in on one side 3 volts out on the other side.
 

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I used a Mo-Door.com setup. I think it was $55
I put it inside the right side cover with a flat stainless push button facing out of the front.. turned out slick and hidden and works like a champ and it's battery powered so no wiring needed
 

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Some years ago I bought a flash and go that accomplishes the same thing with out all the work. I think it cost me $50.00. But I do get the satisfaction of building your own rig.:nerd:
 
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