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Discussion Starter #1
Probably some of the forum members are going to give me a hard time but here it goes.

What is the difference between a bobber and a bagger?
What does OEM means?
What do you mean when you say metric motorcycles?

Hey I live in CentralAmerica and we speak spanish over here.

Please get me out of my ignorance......LMAO
 

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Bobbers are bobbed.:D
Have a lot of stuff taken off or reduced in size. Usually a solo bike, and usually aimed more at shorter trips.

A bagger is set up more for longer trips. Usually a windsheild or fairing, but it must have saddlebags.

OEM, original equipment manufacturer.

In the U.S. we have used standard measurements and balked at converting to the metric system.
A HD measures its engine size in cubic inches, and most bolts are standard size.
Most foreign bike manufacturers measure engine size in cubic centimeters.

Scott
 

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This is a bobber:



This is a bagger:



From what I've seen, baggers typically have hard bags and a fairing, although I think a bike can be considered a bagger with a windshield as well?

OEM: Original Equipment Manufacturer (essentially, buying parts for your bike that are Kawasaki branded for your specific bike)

Metric means non-North American brand bike (ie. Harley Davidson, Victory). Metrics are your european and japanese brands (Honda, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Suzuki, Triumph (?), Ducatti, etc.) Also, I believe they are called metrics because all the hardware uses metric bolts/nuts whereas HD's use imperial.

Please someone correct me if I'm mistaken on any of these.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That was a quick and enlightening reply, thanks a lot.
I'll ask again when I find someting else I do'nt understand.
 

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This is a bobber:



This is a bagger:



From what I've seen, baggers typically have hard bags and a fairing, although I think a bike can be considered a bagger with a windshield as well?

OEM: Original Equipment Manufacturer (essentially, buying parts for your bike that are Kawasaki branded for your specific bike)

Metric means non-North American brand bike (ie. Harley Davidson, Victory). Metrics are your european and japanese brands (Honda, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Suzuki, Triumph (?), Ducatti, etc.) Also, I believe they are called metrics because all the hardware uses metric bolts/nuts whereas HD's use imperial.

Please someone correct me if I'm mistaken on any of these.
That sounds about right to me. I am not an expert on the definitive guidelines regarding what makes a bike a metric or not, but here is my take.

The term was originally given to motorcycles that use metric hardware, as opposed to SAE (standard/imperial or whatever you prefer to call it). It happens that Harley utilizes SAE fasteners, and almost every other bike utilizes metric sized fasteners.

Since the United States is the only country in the world on the old english system (imperial), the term was expanded to mean all bikes made outside of the United States are metrics. However, Victory, a made in the USA product, utilizes metric fasteners, but are not referred to as a metric cruiser.

So, the term really means motorcycles made by companies that are not American owned, and not to be confused with bikes that are made in the USA. (A lot of Kawis were made in the USA, as were many Hondas, but they are both metric cruisers).

The term bobber originated back in the 1930's or 1940's and used to mean a motorcycle that has had it's fender "bobbed" or made smaller, and the bike stripped down to reduce weight in an attempt to gain speed. Motorcycle styling of the time produced large, flared fenders (such as on the Victory Kingpin). So, bobbed literally meant taking that large fender and shearing it down (or "bobbing it") smaller/shorter). One common practice was to replace the rear fender with a shortened front fender, and leave the front wheel fender-less and exposed, a style that is still popular today. It is now a broader term, meaning a custom motorcycle without much chrome, typically having all non-essential body parts removed. In short, the real definition is a stock motorcycle without major modifications, except that most or all of the parts which do not contribute to speed and/or performance have been removed or shortened. Many modifications can be done, such as ape hangers, different (shortened pipes), etc.

A bagger isn't exactly easy to define either, since it means different things to different people. I think it is a motorcycle typically having a fairing and hard bags. Others think it means having a fairing or wind shield with saddlebags and it may or may not have a trunk.

To me, those are called touring bikes, or in the case of soft bags and no trunk, maybe light-touring bikes is a better description.

You will probably get many different answers, but that is my $.02.

Matt
 

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Personally, I think a touring bike is any motorcycle you choose to tour on, whatever the configuration. A true dedicated touring bike would be something like a Gold Wing, HD Ultra Classic or Road Glide Ultra, Kawasaki Voyager, Victory Vision or XC Tour. These bikes are all equipped with hard fairings, bags and trunks, as well as full-on audio systems and cruise control. Most have USB ports or other audio inputs for external music sources, and some even have built-in GPS systems. Full on barcaloungers on two wheels.

For some reason, "baggers" are dubbed "light touring motorcycles." Doesn't make sense to me.

A bobber is not meant for going anywhere outside of locally, IMO.
 

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A bobber is not meant for going anywhere outside of locally, IMO.
Unless you're Wolverine!



Or is that more of a chopper?
 

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actually in the Begining a bobber and a chopper were the same thing...as it used to refer to bobbing or chopping parts
 

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actually in the Begining a bobber and a chopper were the same thing...as it used to refer to bobbing or chopping parts
This is true, and to further confuse the issue, the term bagger is a more recent term as back in the day bikes were divided into 2 groups, bobbers and dressers.
 

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Like bobber and chopper, bagger and dresser have gone from synonymous, to evolving into two different terms.

This is a 'bagger';



Little bit lower and meaner, no tour pak (top case), a little sleeker. Kind of a mix between a cruiser and a touring bike. Hard bags, and, in my mind, a fairing. Some might disagree but I think a cruiser with hard bags is just a cruiser with hard bags... it's not a 'bagger' until it has a fairing! (Oh, and before anyone points out me calling my bike a mini bagger.. I'm planning on putting a fairing on :p). But that's my opinion.

This is a dresser: (Also sometimes called a 'tourer' or even a 'full bagger' )



Lots of wind protection, lots of amenities, built for the long haul.
 

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I thought bagger refered to some of the hags i have seen on the back of some bikes .... you know .. one bagger .. two bagger .. you get the idea:eek:
 

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This would be a dresser. :eek:
 

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What is marbbling and what is it done for?
it is used for those that change or modify their pipes to eleviate backfiring under delceleration .... do a search on here and you will find a thread that explains the process.

To how sucessfull it is, i dont have any experience ... both my bikes run unmodified stock pipes.
 
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