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Discussion Starter #1
Always had a problem with my dipstick from new. Always never felt smooth screwing in or out to check oil. Yesterday while checking oil when I went to screw the dipstick back in had a heck of a time. Upon closer inspection found two small pieces of thread missing. After much care I finally got it back in. Any aftermarket ones available or am I the only one that has had problems with this dipstick threads. Also am somewhat concerned about where the pieces went. I think everyone knows where it went. Any advice on this problem would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance
 

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It's not a great design... Any muck caught around the outside of the dipstick when it's screwed in, can be pushed into the threads when the dipstick is re-inserted. If there's any grit, it can jam up in there and do damage. The dipstick shouldn't be in a recessed hole like it is, IMO.

Unless you've lost a heck of a lot of threads though, it shouldn't need replacing. Mines probably the same, and I just make sure to use a clean rag to wipe out the grit etc from the threads before putting it back in.
 

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I have the exact same problem with my dipstick. I changed my oil today and had an heck of a time getting the stick screwed in, I really didn't like pushing it past the bad spot for fear of damaging the threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the input guys. makes me feel a little better about it. I always wipe off the threaded area before inserting it back into the block. I won't worry about it for now. Somewhere on the forum somebody had talked about a better aftermarket dip stick but for the life of me I can't find it on search mode.
 

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I haven't damaged mine yet but that thing can be difficult to get started. Hopefully someone will post a link to an aftermarket replacement.
 

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I have a similar issues from new. Hard to get back in and felt like the threads weren't cut right on the dip stick.

A year or so ago someone put a HD style with temp gauge on their Voyager. So there are other dipsticks out there....

Personally I would not care about what the oil temp is. Nothing you can do about it anyway....
 

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I have a similar issues from new. Hard to get back in and felt like the threads weren't cut right on the dip stick.

A year or so ago someone put a HD style with temp gauge on their Voyager. So there are other dipsticks out there....

Personally I would not care about what the oil temp is. Nothing you can do about it anyway....
On an air cooled motor without any other temp gauge or indicator it makes sense. Could give you an idea of when it might be time to shut things down. But with the water temp gauge on the dash it makes an oil temp gauge pretty irrelevant.
 

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When I have a rough thread on something I do not have a tap or dye for A wire drill bit works well to smooth the threads. In this case maybe a fine brass wire bit would smooth the threads without removing to much of the aluminum. Something like a drimmel brush that the speed can be controlled on.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to all that replied. Glad to know some of us are in the same boat. Hopefully someone will chime in with an after market idea. For now I think I might try the wire drill bit to smooth out threads. Just glad the problem threads are on the oil dipstick and not the block threads so far. Again thanks for replying.
 

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I'd get a magnet style drain plug too... just incase
 

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I'd get a magnet style drain plug too... just incase
That should take care of any steel fragments... But not the alloy?
 

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OHHH True.
 

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That should take care of any steel fragments... But not the alloy?
The minute amount of alloy from the threads will not stay solid long and should cause no problems. Besides, it is usually hard parts that break the alloy loose anyway.
 

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I have THIS and it works great on my Vulcan 1700. I like that I can read the oil temp as well.
A little pricy for basically a thermometer but I can see the advantage of having it.
I'm just not sure that knowing the temp has any relevance? There's nothing much I can do about it anyway. I just know if I'm riding / have been riding, it's hot... If I've not and the bike's sitting in the garage, then it won't be. Is it somehow useful to know much more than that?

Or perhaps in my case... ignorance is simply bliss?
 

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I'm just not sure that knowing the temp has any relevance? There's nothing much I can do about it anyway. I just know if I'm riding / have been riding, it's hot... If I've not and the bike's sitting in the garage, then it won't be. Is it somehow useful to know much more than that?

Or perhaps in my case... ignorance is simply bliss?

Ehh, thats just me. I like to know what's going on and if everything is working within design parameters. Oil temp is reflective of a few different things. If I notice an increase in oil temp, it would make me look into what was driving that.

I figured if I was going to replace the oil dipstick, it wouldn't hurt to know the temp at the same time. So yes, it is a bit spendy - to just know the temp. But to know the oil level & temp - in the same purchase, for me it made sense.

I would also like to have a Tach and replace my existing gauge cluster, with an LED setup but I cant seem to locate one anywhere.
 

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Mine did the same thing, found what looked like a small pebble in the threads. Cleaned it up and used a small file and touched up the starting thread and the seemed to do the trick. Poor design and I found checking the oil when hot you better have some gloves on.
 

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I have a similar issues from new. Hard to get back in and felt like the threads weren't cut right on the dip stick...
This.

As a former aircraft mechanic, I'm well-acquainted with finely threaded parts, but this dipstick tests even my somewhat-degrading, but still well-honed, skills at every opportunity.

I simply relax, put on some zen, and wait until it finally catches properly, which it always does at some point.

The key is to never, ever, force it past "easy" insertion, else you will likely soon be visiting your local dealer.
 

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Yep, same problem here. Threads are very slightly damaged, which I assume is more likely to have happen at the dealership.

My latest fix for all the grit that collects around the dipstick recess is simply to flush it off before removing the dipstick. I use very hot water, (cold water on a hot engine = disaster) then just wait for the excess to evaporate. This greatly reduces the amount of crud you then have to wipe away once the stick is out.

Really bad design. I am pretty certain I have a main crank bearing on the way out, and the most likely cause is grit in the oil.
 
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