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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Are our bikes V90twin or Vtwin parallel?


How do our cylinder configuration and number of cylinders compare to an inline 4 configuration of the same (or less CC say 600 CC) - both 4 stroke?

Low end torque, HP ridability, etc...


Romper
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
thanks.

Sure - Instead of the word 'compare' - to make it easier for interpretation perhaps - lets use the word 'differ' shall we - in terms of low end torque, HP, readability, etc in city street and some highway usage?

Is much more torque at lower rpms the best way for city riding?

Is generating lower HP better for city riding?

When would higher HP be preferred in city riding?

When would less torque at lower RPMS be preferred in city riding?



Romper
 

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If you need to ask what type of motor is on your bike, maybe owning one isn't for you.

No offense, but do you ever just do any research before asking questions on forums? I mean, simply going to Kawasaki's website and looking for the VN900 specs will tell you what motor it has. Additionally, wikipedia has all sorts of pages dedicated to questions like yours in this thread.

I'm not saying posting questions on a forum is bad, just make certain they aren't questions which could be easily found by performing simple searches either here within the forums or within your favorite search engine.

Besides, I thought you were selling your ride due to your shoulder issue?

Peace
 

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you have over 300 posts and now you ask this?

I suppose it's some sort of a joke rather... :):):)

a good one, I may add.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here we go - slugger fest !!! Bring it on guys!

I know I have the V twin, but the original question was and still is - is our Vtwin V90 or Vtwin parallel. I understand that you guys cannot and will not answer this question now - so don't worry, go back to sleep and save your energy.

Yes, i did perform all the basic searches on this question before I posted this question.

Perhaps you should have asked me if i had of done this initially; instead of instantly going for the jugular and presuming I did not - which comes with today's rush rush society and watered down communication ethics i guess....

Wiki website definition -
"Engine Type 4-Stroke, Liquid-Cooled, SOHC, 4-Valve Cylinder Head, V-Twin"

kawasaki website defintion -
"Type Liquid-cooled, 4-stroke V-Twin"

OEM Kawasaki Manual -
"4-stroke, SOHC, V2-cylinder"


yes, still thinking of selling the n900 - hence the questions on the i4 cylinder configuration.

Peace.
 

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According to MotorcycleUSA.com it's a 903cc 55-degree V-Twin SOHC engine. I don't think I've ever seen a Parallel V on a bike, but then I don't look at specs unless I'm interested in the bike. Although the 9er does very well on city streets, the cruiser configuration is specifically a long distance, highway design. The low seat and longer rake came out of designing bikes for the long straight desert roads of the south west. Both VN900 models, being modern bikes with an old school look, are set up for wide range of riding styles and handle just about anything (reasonably paved) well. But if you're looking specifically for city driving, you want a higher seat, tight rake, snappy accelleration and superb braking. You don't need a high top-end speed, but you need to be able change speeds (up and down) quickly. You need to be nimble enough to avoid moving and stationary obstacles in a heartbeat (hence the tight rake angle) and you want to be able to stand on your pegs when you can't get around pot holes and such due to congestion. You also want a good long suspension stroke with stiff shocks for the same reason. The VN900s are great bikes, but they're not Urban Warriors. For that you want to look at a Versys 1000. That would be a good bike to use as a comparison, since its close to the same engine size (1043cc) and the same manufacturer.

Oh, it's 6:02am and I finished my coffee an hour and a half ago. Live long and prosper, now I get breakfast!
 

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Romper;

I think if you really look at your original post it seems to indicate a real lack of understanding motorcycle types. I am far from an "expert" on motorcycle design, so I can't give the technical definition of engine types, but maybe this will.

http://www.quora.com/What-are-the-t...a-V-twin-parallel-twin-and-an-inline-4-engine

And I dont know if there is a "V twin parallel" engine... What do you have as an example?

Shoulder feeling better?

WEG
 

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How about the Yamaha venture engine? It is called a v4. I guess it could be called a parallel v twin.
Hi Shep;

Yeah, I guess that could be right, but I think they are best known as "V4's" like V6's, V8's, etc. But no new info here...

Second cup of coffee on a freezing Boston morning brings out these silly posts. ?. I sure wish Spring would get here...

WEG
 

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My opinion. V twin torque and horsepower at low to mid rpms. Both drop off at redline (6000-6500) Not racers by any means, but, some are pretty quick. Inline 4s make HP near redline (double off the above.) Power really builds when rpms increase. Yes both are 4 stroke. Some manufactures made inline 3s that were 2 stroke back in the day I believe. My voyager is plenty fast enough for me and comfy. My go fast, see what it will do would get Me toasted on a Busa or a ZX14. Been on a few rockets in My day and know I don't need that speed.
 

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A V parallel configuration looks like an inline. The cylinders are side by side but not quite in the same plane. They're offset by only a few degrees making a very tight V. I think it was Volvo I saw these on. Romper, did we answer your questions or are we off base on what you meant?
 

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Hi Shep;

Yeah, I guess that could be right, but I think they are best known as "V4's" like V6's, V8's, etc. But no new info here...

Second cup of coffee on a freezing Boston morning brings out these silly posts. ?. I sure wish Spring would get here...

WEG
I have had 2 cups, going for 3 now. Cold and snow here this AM. Only ride I will get today will be on the John Deere pushing snow around. LOL
 

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Are our bikes V90twin or Vtwin parallel?


How do our cylinder configuration and number of cylinders compare to an inline 4 configuration of the same (or less CC say 600 CC) - both 4 stroke?

Low end torque, HP ridability, etc...


Romper
Romper

The only bike I know of with a different V twin configuration is Motoguzzi http://www.motoguzzi-us.com/mobile/motorcycles/california-1400-custom/overview.html

Their V twin is mounted with the V being right to left instead of front to back.

A paralell engine is just that Parallel. Cylinders parallel equally spaced from each other not at an angle.

Your question was far to broad, there are just way too many engine types out their to answer your question. Example the new Vulcan S uses a 650 cc parallel twin taken from their crotch rocket line but modified for the cruiser market. Basically the same engine but totally different power curves etc. etc. and that is with the same engine type and displacement.

It is near impossible to answer your question in a concise manner as there are just too many variables.

It would be helpful to explain the reason for your question in the future as this may at least provide some context and reason for the question.
 

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Here we go - slugger fest !!! Bring it on guys!

I know I have the V twin, but the original question was and still is - is our Vtwin V90 or Vtwin parallel. I understand that you guys cannot and will not answer this question now - so don't worry, go back to sleep and save your energy.

Yes, i did perform all the basic searches on this question before I posted this question.

Perhaps you should have asked me if i had of done this initially; instead of instantly going for the jugular and presuming I did not - which comes with today's rush rush society and watered down communication ethics i guess....

Wiki website definition -
"Engine Type 4-Stroke, Liquid-Cooled, SOHC, 4-Valve Cylinder Head, V-Twin"

kawasaki website defintion -
"Type Liquid-cooled, 4-stroke V-Twin"

OEM Kawasaki Manual -
"4-stroke, SOHC, V2-cylinder"


yes, still thinking of selling the n900 - hence the questions on the i4 cylinder configuration.

Peace.
Its a V-twin Romper. Engine is shaped in a V. 55 degree v twin to be exact. Parallel twins the cylinders run in parallel side by side instead of opposite one another like on the 900. Ninja 650 sport bike is a parallel twin. Google a pic of that engine and you will see the difference. That was my first bike. Interesting engine characteristics.
 

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Engine Power

Engine Power characteristics;

Now these are rules of thumb, and there are always exceptions that prove up the rules, .... so don't get your pink frillys in a twist. :freaked-out:

(unless of course you have the physical characteristics to fill out those pink frillys, ...:drool: then feel free!)

First, ... HP & Torque: ... Horsepower gives you an idea of how fast you can go, Torque tells you how big a load you can haul around with all that Horsepower you just made.

Next a word about Stroke. .... Long stroke = more Torque and a short stroke = more HP.

And before you jump in with those twisted frillys and say "but My numbers are different!!" check and see whether you have a short stroke or a long stroke engine.

For example: the 800's are short stroke V-Twin engines and will make about as much Torque as they do Horsepower. They'll also spin up faster than a Long stroke V-Twin engine, ... that's why they can run rings around their long stroke siblings like the 1600s. ... But then, you can load down a 1600 like it's a moving van and it'll still chug happily up that hill like it wasn't even there.

V-Twins; Doesn't matter if it's a 45° 52° 55° 60°or a 90° V-Twin, and it doesn't matter if it's mounted inline or transverse. A V-Twin typically makes more Torque than it does Horsepower!

Parallel Twins; typically make about as much Torque as they do HorsePower. Again, Stroke will determine whether it's more Horsepower or Torque that reaches the ground.

Inline Multi Cylinders; .. Doesn't really matter if it's a 3, a 4, or a 6. It will typically make more Horsepower than it does Torque.Some so much so that you will have to slip the clutch at every stop sign. Their ability to carry loads is similarly affected. However, if you can keep the engine revolutions up in that typically narrow and high rpm power-band, Look Out.

Opposed Cylinders; Think GoldWing, BMW, VW, etc. amd whether it's a 2, a 4, or a 6. Doesn't really matter, it will make almost as much Horsepower as it does Torque. Typically smooth and well balanced.

Parallel V; Are you sure this configuration doesn't break the laws of physics??? :eek:
 

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thanks.

Sure - Instead of the word 'compare' - to make it easier for interpretation perhaps - lets use the word 'differ' shall we - in terms of low end torque, HP, readability, etc in city street and some highway usage?

Is much more torque at lower rpms the best way for city riding?

Is generating lower HP better for city riding?

When would higher HP be preferred in city riding?

When would less torque at lower RPMS be preferred in city riding?



Romper
My unsolicited opinion is that you are so focused on the wrong things.

There isn't one certain kind of engine good for city riding. There isn't one kind of motorcycle good for city riding. The best kind of motorcycle for you is one that YOU like and is comfortable FOR YOU. Not what somebody else says is good for you. 250-ish dual sports are popular commuter bikes in a lot of places. They are single cylinder and make a dozen or so HP but can still get up and go quickly because they are so light. Some of them will do 0-60 only a second or two slower than a typical Vulcan 900, and some would do it faster. On the other hand, bikes like the V-Strom 650 and Versys 650 make 60+ HP and are popular commuter bikes because they are so multipurpose and comfortable for lots of different sized riders. Those are just two ideas. There are a LOT more options out there.

If you have to have a cruiser, then stick with that style. If you are open to something else, then try something else. Just go to a couple of dealers and sit on some stuff. THEN start doing your research. Every motorcycle is going to have some kind of known issue, whether it's something small like changing the seat or adding risers to make it perfect for you or something like a major recall that you need to verify has been done before you buy it. If you focus on the internet's collective knowledge that THIS bike has THAT issue and THAT bike has THIS issue, you'll drive yourself crazy.

Bottom line is that numbers and specs don't answer every question, unless you are an engineer. If you are, nerd out until you can't nerd anymore. If not, think about how YOU plan to use the bike and then start looking for something that...Revs Your Heart. :D (Do I have to pay Yamaha to say that?)

Good luck with your search.
 

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Wouldn't a parallel V be the same kind of setup found in the Honda Magna's? Basically 2 V-Twins sitting side-by-side forming a 4 cylinder v-twin. Heck, any V configured engine with more than 2 cylinders could be considered parallel since each pair of V's sits parallel with the next.
 

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Wouldn't a parallel V be the same kind of setup found in the Honda Magna's? Basically 2 V-Twins sitting side-by-side forming a 4 cylinder v-twin. Heck, any V configured engine with more than 2 cylinders could be considered parallel since each pair of V's sits parallel with the next.
Although that makes sense logically and physically, there actually is a set up referred to as V-Parallel. I've only seen it in the automotive world though. If you look at the engine, it appears to be an in line (4, 6, 8, whatever). A single valve cover over a single block. However, remove the head and you see that the cylinders are staggered and angled down toward the crank. They're only offset by something like 3 degrees so the block is cast as a single piece with a single head. Not being an engineer, I have no idea what advangates this config offers; other than high priced parts and service.

On a side note; the boxer, pancake or flat configuration is also technically a V engine. The designation is V-180. Now melt the fecking snow so we can start riding!
 
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