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Screwed up suspension, hard braking, and improper tire inflation are all causes. You can find a ton more info on google.

Here ya go.
 

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cupping is caused by improper tire pressure
 

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If you are in North America, your cupping (also called spalling) will be more severe on the left side of your tire. Lean to the right or left when you're going in a straight line and you'll feel the buzzing of the tire on the pavement. On mine it;s always way more pronounced on the left side of the r tire than the right. In the UK it's the opposite. It just means the tires are doing their job. My bike a has always developed cupping on the front tire, starting somewhere around 4-5k miles and there is nothing wrong with the suspension or air pressure. it also won't hurt anything and your tire will wear completely out before the cupping becomes a safety issue. All 4 sets of tires I've put on this bike have done it. When you lean into a turn, the leading edge of your tread pattern its the pavement first and wears first. The reason the left side wears out faster than the right is because left turns are more than twice as long as right turns, generally. I saw one article from a guy who monitored such things and discovered that he put about 30-50%% more miles on the left side over the life of the tire than the right just with left turns. Riding style and air pressure can help mitigate cupping, but you won't stop it if you ride much. Avoid sudden turns or excessive front braking and it will make the tires last longer.
 

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One bit to add to Patrick's explanation, and some further clarification. The reason the left side of the tire wears faster than the right isn't the left hand turns so much.

Take a good, close look at the road. There's a crown with the center being the high point. They do this to help the water run off the pavement. Because of this, even on a straight road, you're effectively leaning left in relation to the road.
 

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One bit to add to Patrick's explanation, and some further clarification. The reason the left side of the tire wears faster than the right isn't the left hand turns so much.

Take a good, close look at the road. There's a crown with the center being the high point. They do this to help the water run off the pavement. Because of this, even on a straight road, you're effectively leaning left in relation to the road.
It's been a subject of debate for a long time, but I'm not completely sold on the road crown argument But it could be a contributing factor. This guy doesnt thinks so.

Motorcycle Tire Wear

Others do, though, from what I've read.

The main thing is to understand it's normal on these heavy cruisers regardless of what causes it and it won't hurt anything.

By the way, where are you located?
 
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