Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey guys........
great site glad to be on, tons of info. I know most ofyou are experienced riders and probably know the answer to this question regarding looking for the stats. But every year their are a certain amount of fatalities/serious motorcycle accidents in each state.

But I was wondering which bike are involved. I am sure the stats will show that the sport/jap bikes (higher acceleration,higher top end speed) probably take up more of the state and contribute to most of the accidents???

I wonder if their is a dmv/government motorvehicle site with yearly statistics overall but on the type of bike probably is alot harder to find thats y I rather ask you guys?????Please let me know when you get a chance. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts
hey guys........
great site glad to be on, tons of info. I know most ofyou are experienced riders and probably know the answer to this question regarding looking for the stats. But every year their are a certain amount of fatalities/serious motorcycle accidents in each state.

But I was wondering which bike are involved. I am sure the stats will show that the sport/jap bikes (higher acceleration,higher top end speed) probably take up more of the state and contribute to most of the accidents???

I wonder if their is a dmv/government motorvehicle site with yearly statistics overall but on the type of bike probably is alot harder to find thats y I rather ask you guys?????Please let me know when you get a chance. Thank you.
I am unsure of the stats, but there are a lot of things to consider besides the acceleration and speed of a bike.

A few to consider are:
Likelyhood to wear protective equipment. I enjoy the joke about being a pirate or a power ranger. But, on the street I see a lot of cruiser riders with protection from road rash and no helmet vs the sporties wearing a helmet in their shorts and tank top.
Sporties seem to expect and use more performance from their bikes. Does this mean in a tight situation they can lean it over farther, swerve more, stop faster??? Their equipment will.
The age difference should give cruisers the mature advantage. But, how many bikes are bought to quell the midlife crisis, with little interest in learning how to ride.

It is good to be concerned about safety. But, getting on any bike is engaging in a high risk activity.
If you take your time; learn you bike, and ride within your acceptable risk level; it doesn't matter what type you ride.

Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
It is my understanding that most accidents are caused by inexperienced riding skills and the most prevalent accident is the inability to ride thru corners and actually riding off the road .. this can happen at any speed, while some may have the ability to run a corner at a certain speed, some may not have the skills to do the same corner at half the speed. Kinda like looking at the corner vs looking thru it at where you want to end up.... you steer where you look.

I have seen more accidents involving cruisers than i have sport bikes .... you hear more about sport bikes via the news because to be the 2nd story lead in , excessive speed has to be involved.

It is good to be concerned about safety. But, getting on any bike is engaging in a high risk activity.
If you take your time; learn you bike, and ride within your acceptable risk level; it doesn't matter what type you ride.
well written ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
It is good to be concerned about safety. But, getting on any bike is engaging in a high risk activity.
If you take your time; learn you bike, and ride within your acceptable risk level; it doesn't matter what type you ride, as long as you get the loudest pipes and brightest, blinkiest, flashiest lights you can find.

Scott
There. Fixed it for ya.




Oh yeah...I went there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
I generally consider myself a motorcycling safety nut, so I watch stuff like this with interest. We read in the newspapers, see it on TV and especially on the internet on these forums, about motorcycle accidents. Let me first state, that, coming from my 30 odd years in law enforcement, that most crashes are not accidents. By definition, an accident is an occurence in which there was no prior warning of its happening, nor could anything have been done to prevent it. IOW, something unexpected and unavoidable. What I am saying is, these things, could have, for the vast majority of them, been avoided somehow. So the term "motor vehicle accident" is a misnomer. Most law enforcement agencies refer to them as "crashes" or collisions.

In examining motorcycle mishaps over the years, I constantly read that that the most common crash in an urban setting is the one in which a cage turns left in front of an oncoming motorcycle. (or other vehicle for that matter) I submit that most of these could be avoided if the rider would look well ahead of him/her i order to keep a (mostly) clear picture of their traffic environment. It is essential to "read" what other vehicles are doing or about to do. One needs to be vigilant and very defensive, and be ready to take evasive action if necessary. Statements such as, "I had to lay it down" suggest to me that the rider wasn't paying adequate attention to traffic and was looking too close in front of him/her and when things unfolded, there wasn't enough time to react properly. Or they just didn't possess the proper motorcycling skills to deal with such situations. It's called situational awareness.

Out on the road, I believe that a large majority of accidents involve a bike going off the road due to inexperience. Too many new riders get on more bike than they are capable of safely riding, and then succomb to peer pressure and ride way beyond their capability. The bike isn't to blame, it's the rider doing something they shouldn't be doing. Big bikes and new riders are a poor mix.

The last thing is the mixture of motorcycles and alcohol. I'd guess that most of us enjoy a drink or a beer or a glass of wine. But it's bad news to mix alcohol with riding. A very large number of motorcycle crashes, especially those involving fatalities, are alcohol (and sometimes drug) related. Guys, I know a cold beer on a hot day tastes good, but even one beer/drink/glass of wine can impair your ability to safely ride. Trust me, it's true. Please don't take that kind of chance, particulaly with a passenger onboard.

Keep your head up and look where you want to go instead of where you are. It's true, you go where you look on a motorcycle. Know your motorcycle thoroughly before attacking the twisties so you know how it reacts and steers in the curves. And lastly, do wear proper riding safety gear. Some of the riding gear does lack "cool," especially when riding a cruiser, but it sure beats lying in a hospital being treated for serious road rash, head injuries, etc. Ride as though something bad is about to happen and do everything you can to avoid it. Ride as if everyone but you is crazy and about to do something incredibly stupid, involving you are the only safe and sane one on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I was out riding the weekend, rolling down the highway. I ran up on to 3 sport bike riders. They slowed way down, so i moved to the slow lane. And next thing i see, is one of them passing me on ONE WHEEL. Now i was moving along at about 70mph as he passed me. Then i saw the ugliest thing i wanted to see, as he rolled that bike over backwards and hit the pavement. OMG watching his body bounce and roll down the highway, plastic flying everywhere. It was not pretty. He was in any gear other than a helmet. Then i got to him he was out cold, bleeding from the mouth and nose. i hope he made it ok. Last I saw of him, him headed to the hospital. I dont go the hospital.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
great feedback guys, i agree with most of the things for sure. Anybody know of a website to actually document the type of accidents and bikes involved, for real hardcore stats??? I was actually shocked that someone posted that cruisers are in more accidents but like to see the data.......

I can see turns being a huge culprits or even not stoppin well. I actually saw one in person. A ninja 600 i think or honda cbr jap bike, was doing the right thing, and another car came out and blew the stop sign and intersected him. he locked up on brakes to slow 10-15miles, but it was too late , he hit the car and flew off the bike, over the hood, actually going that slow, i was shocked, and the bike's nose got crunched into the car. so it was minor, he was ok, but now u dont have that safety u do if u were in the car with seat belts you wldnt have an abrasion in that situation , gng that slow.....!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
great feedback guys, i agree with most of the things for sure. Anybody know of a website to actually document the type of accidents and bikes involved, for real hardcore stats??? I was actually shocked that someone posted that cruisers are in more accidents but like to see the data.......

I can see turns being a huge culprits or even not stoppin well. I actually saw one in person. A ninja 600 i think or honda cbr jap bike, was doing the right thing, and another car came out and blew the stop sign and intersected him. he locked up on brakes to slow 10-15miles, but it was too late , he hit the car and flew off the bike, over the hood, actually going that slow, i was shocked, and the bike's nose got crunched into the car. so it was minor, he was ok, but now u dont have that safety u do if u were in the car with seat belts you wldnt have an abrasion in that situation , gng that slow.....!!!

14 years over the road is my stats .... in all 48 states, most squibs come up thru the cc ranks ... most cruiser riders i have met come up thru the mid life crisis ... are talked into a 800 lb bike with no experience. While this is a generalization, i see what i see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts
great feedback guys, i agree with most of the things for sure. Anybody know of a website to actually document the type of accidents and bikes involved, for real hardcore stats??? I was actually shocked that someone posted that cruisers are in more accidents but like to see the data.......

I can see turns being a huge culprits or even not stoppin well. I actually saw one in person. A ninja 600 i think or honda cbr jap bike, was doing the right thing, and another car came out and blew the stop sign and intersected him. he locked up on brakes to slow 10-15miles, but it was too late , he hit the car and flew off the bike, over the hood, actually going that slow, i was shocked, and the bike's nose got crunched into the car. so it was minor, he was ok, but now u dont have that safety u do if u were in the car with seat belts you wldnt have an abrasion in that situation , gng that slow.....!!!
I like numbers too!
If you find a link like that; be sure to post it here.:)

Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
Did you know that a 17-18 year old male is about 15,600 times as likely to be killed driving a moto, while about 4.8 times as likely while driving a car as the average 25-55 year old male driver in a car. You can play with days of the week, gender, age ranges, vehicle type, etc... Weekend moto riders get into a lot more fatal accidents per mile than commuters do. Females are cited as a bit more than 6 times as likely as males to be in fatal accidents in the 25-54 age range.

The 16-20 year old moto males though are amazingly high fatality rate. Hundreds and thousands times as likely as the rest of the population.
theres some scary numbers here ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
I think the stats probably vary a lot by area. Here in Maine cruisers are far more numorous than sport bikes and it seems that most fatal accidents in the news are cruisers and often Harleys so often not younger people. Sadly a lot involve husbands and wives. The newspaper also always seems to note if a helmet was worn or not. Almost always they are not worn. Also strangely enough it seems most of the deaths seem to happen on more rural routes and not on the highway or in the bigger towns.

I would have to imagine that alcohol and/or drugs play a big role in a lot of crashes. From most stats I have read, alcohol is involved in roughly 50% of crashes. I decided that I would never mix the two, its just not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
What exactly are you trying to find out with these stats? Trying to convince the wife you bought a safe style bike? Numbers are great, but as has already been pointed out, they will not necessarily tell the whole story here.
Personally, I feel the stats will tell more about WHO chooses which type of bikes, then they will tell which type of bike is less accident prone. Put a safety minded rider on a ZX10 and he'll ride safely for tens of thousands of miles, put a squid on a Vulcan 900 and he'll figure out how to stuff it into the side of a car within a couple hundred miles. The whole thing is that a SQUID is more likely to choose a ZX10 and a more laid back rider is more likely to choose a Vulcan 900.

Coming from 27 years of riding standard and sport bikes, I'd. say HANDS DOWN a sport bike is safer than a cruiser. They stop better, turn better, you're in a better position to control the bike for any maneuver, they can accelerate out of trouble better, etc. About the only safety advantage I can see of a cruiser is that if a car pulls out in front of you and you can't stop, you're more likely to push the car out of the way with the heavier bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Actually, I did want to assure her that japbikes were more dangerous. Actually shocked after some of the points you guys made, made sense that cruiser were heavier and harde to ride. But the point on age played huge factor, younger people take dumber risks, thats a hard stat. Good discussion. thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
While sportbikes may, in some situations be "safer" than a cruiser, the problem I see is that they tend, in general, to be ridden by younger riders, often in a very unsafe manner. A sportbike generally has a lot of power and inexperienced riders have a hard time managing that power, and they get into trouble by either mismanaging it, or by abusing that power.

Cruisers, while less maneuverable than a sportbike, and, generally, again, less powerful, tend to be ridden by older, more mature riders, in a more sane manner. Exception? Those mid-life crisis riders or riders who waited to retire until late in life before taking up motorcycling. Older folks just don't have the reactions as younger folks, and sometimes, the mental processes are slower as well.

While I don't have any numbers to back this up, my experience as a LEO showed me that young (as in 16--20 year olds) drivers are more likely to be involved in an accident. Female drivers of any age tend to be the speeders, while male drivers of any age tend to be more aggressive/reckless in their driving. This is merely an observation on my part, not any sort of study.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,068 Posts
One of my friends is an R1 nut...far as he's concerned, that bike is the pinnacle of motorcycle engineering. And he's on his second one because he totaled the first one last year....

...doing a wheelie...that turned into a 180-degree flip...in traffic...in downtown Twin Falls.

He also always wears his helmet and suffers badly from the crotchrocket-rider tendency to wear a tank top and jeans to protect him from road rash.

We also have a local sportbike gang who have refused to let the snow and tempurature inversion that's kept daily highs in the teens for the last month keep them off the road. They zip up and down a highway leaving town, doing wheelies and seeing how fast they can get to their rev limiters in every gear.

My observations can't give you an answer as to who wrecks more. But it seems to me cruiser riders hit pavement typically because of inexperience or inattentiveness, while sportbike guys buy it from just doing stuff that's flat-out stupid. My $.02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
To quote a video I watched when I was getting back in to this. "The best safety device out there is the one you will use!" I wear all my gear every time. I also look at every vehicle I see with the assumption that it is their desire to kill me. When they don't, I am surprised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
To quote a video I watched when I was getting back in to this. "The best safety device out there is the one you will use!" I wear all my gear every time. I also look at every vehicle I see with the assumption that it is their desire to kill me. When they don't, I am surprised.
IMO, the best safety device out there is the one inside your skull--you brain. It should be used well, and in an orderly manner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,477 Posts
As good as anyones brain is, you cannot anticipate every clown action that can/will happen. Having ATGATT can make the difference. I've seen qood riders get caught up in crashes that there was just no way to avoid, short of not riding. The use of good gear, worn consistantly can make a big difference in eliminating or minimizing the effects of a crash. Not saying they are inevitable, however, one cannot avoid everything. A working brain, focused on the task at hand is invaluable, however we all have paradynes about what should happen at curves, intersections, on roadways, etc. don't get caught out because someone pulls a fast one that you didn't/couldn't have anticipated. JMHO
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top