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BOTM Winner, January 2015
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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody know how to fix this without removing the engine???? It's cross threaded about 1/4 " down. I have heard of filing diagonal grooves in the old spark plug and re-threading down into hole with a socket wrench and then vacuuming out any shavings.

Second question: Anyone ever removed a VN2000 engine??? The manual doesn't explain HOW to remove the ENGINE after all of the parts are unplugged and disassembled. It weighes about 350 lbs????

Thanks
 

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If it was me, I would try to locate a real tap for those threads. The big question is if you can get the metal flakes out of the cylinder. Sorry for your situation - that is a downer !!

I cross threaded a bolt into the aluminum block of my Chevy trailblazer a couple of years ago changing a thermostat. I feel your pain:(
 

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plug

roll the cylinder to top dead center, stuff a cotton ball into the sparkplug hole,but not all the way in. Squirt a little oil on top of the cotton ball. Get a spark plug hole tap,rethread the hole. Vac out the filings. Use a dental pic to get the cotton ball out. Been there/done that.
 

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Ouch, never never start the spark plug into the thread with a ratchet always turn the socket by hand.

OK, heres a suggestion, first get the right tap and make sure its on a long extention handle, this will help to align straight into the hole, remove the gas tank to get easy access to the spark plug hole. Remove the air breather so you have access to the intake system and somehow connect an air hose to the intake so you can pressurize the engine cylinder, you will want to regulate the air to get the proper flow. Now before you turn on the air, turn the engine until you have the intake valves open and the piston preferably at BDC. If not at BDC the air pressure will push it there. Also your throttle will need to be wide open. Ensure you have a good flow of air coming out of the spark plug hole.

The reason you want to use a tap is because the air induced into the cylinder will blow out past the flukes of the tap blowing the tapping debre with it. Wear safety glasses/goggles.

You will need to be very carefull starting that tap to ensure you are in the right thread track or you will be replacing a head.

Plan it out do a little testing with the air and tap and it will save you from pulling a motor and head.
 

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BOTM Winner, January 2015
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your help

The big problem is that the frame is directly centered over the sparkplug hole, so a tap is out of the question unless I pull the motor. There is about 3" of clearance.

I appreciate the help. Anyone know how to pull the 125 cu. in. engine out of the cycle after the bike is unplugged from it? The manual doesn't specify. It just says to "remove engine". Can it be done in a two car garage?

I'm starting to think I might have to give this job to the dealership, knowing they will screw something up as all mechanics in this town seem to do.

Any thoughts on engine removal AFTER dissassembly?

Thanks
 

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AZ, I would still consider using the method I described just don't put the extention on the tap. The plug holes are quite deep and a small socket with a thumb wheel on it would do the trick to get the tap started right, the head is aluminum not steel and a new tapped tap is quite easy to start on existing threads in aluminum.

You will go through the same process of cleaning the threads engine in or out of the frame.

I believe to pull the motor you need to unbolt the lower frame rails, but personnally pulling the motor to clean up a possible 1/4" of plug thread would be my last option. I was a precision machinist and millwright in a previous life, and have fixed a plug thread using this exact method for a friend, the setup is what took the time the tap cleaning of the thread took less than 5 minutes.

Make sure you use a tapped tap, preferrably 4 fluke (not 2 fluke) it will be the most forgiving in aligning to the original threads.
 

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BOTM Winner, January 2015
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Discussion Starter #7
one more question

Thanks Livin The Dream! Now, my threads at the top where I would start the tap are stripped. How can I ensure that I get the correct thread track? Will I be guessing or will the tap just find its way?
 

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tap

Thanks Livin The Dream! Now, my threads at the top where I would start the tap are stripped. How can I ensure that I get the correct thread track? Will I be guessing or will the tap just find its way?
AZ, there are THREE types of tap, First pass use a TAPER tap,it will be the most forgiving and easiest to find the correct thread track. Once you are sure you have the correct track do NOT run the taper tap all the way to the bottom of the threads, as it will remove more material that you likley need to remove.. Use the second stage tap , called a plug tap , to follow once you have the correct track.
third stage is a bottoming tap , but unlikely you will need that , a plug tap should clean up the threads quite nicely .
This is all presuming that you have enough material left in the head to restore the thread. If not , then you will be looking at installing a thread insert, possible , but not east on the rear head . Use Living's air suggestion as the best way to prevent cuttings in the cylinder. The cotton ball idea will not work well if you need to run threads all the way to the bottom of the hole & it will definately not work on an thread insert install. Should you have to go the insert direction , you will need a really SHORT drill bit & a right angle drill.
yes the engine removes from the right side {viewed from drivers seat} , section of the frame is removable. BUT may as well exhaust ALL repair possibilities. Use removal as a fall back position only.
 

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clearance

AZ, you dont think you have enough room for a tap in there???
If not , YES you can diagonally cut the threads on an old plug , 4 equidistant diagonal cuts this will help clean up the threads , but if the thread is completly gone , this wont repair/restore them. If you use the old plug , idea, still use Livings compressed air to keep cyl clean
 

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BOTM Winner, January 2015
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Discussion Starter #10
Great info! Just one more question

I think I've got it now! Just one more question before I start. I found some aluminum shavings at the base of the spark plug hole where your threads start around the lip seal. Do you think there are some down in the cylinder and if so, should I try to suction it out with a plastic hose attached to a vacuum cleaner before tapping?

Thanks
 

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plug

I think I've got it now! Just one more question before I start. I found some aluminum shavings at the base of the spark plug hole where your threads start around the lip seal. Do you think there are some down in the cylinder and if so, should I try to suction it out with a plastic hose attached to a vacuum cleaner before tapping?

Thanks
yes try to get them out. I did the very same thing on the very same cylinder. I bought an actual "spark plug" tap. There is plenty of room. Start it with your fingers. Get a wrench that fits the tap. Use one finger to put slight pressure on the tap and to keep it straight. On mine..I maybe did one full turn to clean the threads. Worked like a charm. but it was a p.i.t.a.
 

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AZ, there may be some aluminum shavings inside depending on their size by inducing a good air through the intake the air flow out of the spark plug hole and the turbulance in the cylinder may float them out, let the air flow for awhile before starting the tap process. Generally I'm guessing their quite small and there's only a few. Any small aluminum pieces left in the cylinder after all is said and done, will either get vapourized or blown out the exhaust when you fire it up, if it was steel shavings I would be pulling the cylinder head. I have seen the complete centre of a piston eaten way by running a very lean mixer on NOS with not a mark on the cylinder wall of the motor.

I'm going to try and attached a pic of the three types of tapes, the left is the tapper, as you can see its got a long almost none thread area on each fluke at the start of the tap, the middle one is the plug and the right is the bottoming tap, these are only used when tapping a blind hole.

Again use a short socket that will fit the square head on the tap and a socket thumb wheel to wiggle and feel the tape start properly in the original threads, it is a feel process and I believe you should be able to clean the damaged threads by hand without any execessive pressure on the tap. You will probably never get to the plug tap as the threads will clean up with the taper tap by hand turning on the socket thumb wheel.
 

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I have done lots of vw Bug Aluminum heads with just putting thick grease on the tap.I Never thought of the cotton ball technique

Good one Gilly iowa
 

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BOTM Winner, January 2015
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Discussion Starter #17
got the reverse threader but it's too long

Anybody know if it's safe to drill a 1/2" access hole through the top of the vn2000 frame to access the rear sparkplug hole with a 5 1/2" back tap tool? It would be drilled just left of center in the top flat part of the frame and not on the edges where most of the frame strength is.

I don't think I will be able to use a hand tap as there is no room to control the angle of the tap. I can't get 2 fingers in that little space where the wrench goes (can't find the thread track by feel and keep the sparkplug tap straight- this is with the Snap-On spark plug tap) and the back tap I purchased from Jegs is too long and won't fit between the top of the frame and the spark plug hole.

I'm at the frustration level where I'm going to get the friggin drill and just bore a 1/2" hole to see the sparkplug socket through the top and lower the reverse tap down through the frame and into the hole.

HELP PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:eek::eek::(
 

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hole

Anybody know if it's safe to drill a 1/2" access hole through the top of the vn2000 frame to access the rear sparkplug hole with a 5 1/2" back tap tool? It would be drilled just left of center in the top flat part of the frame and not on the edges where most of the frame strength is.

I don't think I will be able to use a hand tap as there is no room to control the angle of the tap. I can't get 2 fingers in that little space where the wrench goes (can't find the thread track by feel and keep the sparkplug tap straight- this is with the Snap-On spark plug tap) and the back tap I purchased from Jegs is too long and won't fit between the top of the frame and the spark plug hole.

I'm at the frustration level where I'm going to get the friggin drill and just bore a 1/2" hole to see the sparkplug socket through the top and lower the reverse tap down through the frame and into the hole.

HELP PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:eek::eek::(
Can you weld the hole up after the repair?? , protect the engine form spark/spatter, the lower hole will be hardest to fill.
 

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Anybody know if it's safe to drill a 1/2" access hole through the top of the vn2000 frame to access the rear sparkplug hole with a 5 1/2" back tap tool? It would be drilled just left of center in the top flat part of the frame and not on the edges where most of the frame strength is.
The designers really outdid themselves in regards to the VN2000 spark plugs.
I have thought of drilling an access hole in the frame. It looks pretty sturdy. I don't think it would impact the strength. In your case, it might be a good idea vs removing the engine. I'm getting ready to rebuild mine due to excessive oil consumtion. It does not sound like it's going to be a fun project.
 

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If I might make a suggestion;

My dad taught me a trick on installing spark plugs that guarantees you will never cross thread one again. Once the old plug is out clean the threads on it real well and lube them with a small(tiny) amount of light grease, find a piece of rubber vacuum hose long enough to reach the bottom of the spark plug hole and stick it onto the electrode(top) of the plug. Insert the plug into the hole and turn the rubber hose. When it is straight it will go right into the threads. If it tries to cross thread you can not put enough pressure on it to damage the threads. Simply back it out a bit, move the hose to one side and try again. It only takes a second to find the right angle.
The old plug with the tiny bit of grease on the threads helps to lubricate the threads for the new plug to go in easier. This has worked for me for over 40 years now.
 
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