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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svjytSjd6g0

This is pretty cool!

What really stuck with me though was that it was a couple of seconds before oil started to appear on the rockers. And of course, not until it revved were the valves really saturated with oil. Really drives home the importance of not doing these jack rabbit starts. Let the bike idle for a few seconds before taking off, and go easy on it for the first couple of minutes. Every time I hear these guys start their bikes and immediately take off at full throttle (or take off at WOT with a painfully low idle, i.e., no oil pressure) I can practically sense the valves wearing! A buddy of mine was really fond of that 'trick'. Had a Road King, '05 model year I think. Loved to sit on it, put it in gear, start it and just immediately take off. Plenty of folks told him that was bad for the bike. He brushed it off. Guess who blew a motor at 30k miles? I'm sure it was a coincidence though :) ($6k later to rebuild the motor, he continued to treat it like that. Hey, his bike, no skin off my nose. But sheesh, what a waste of money. Just let it breathe for a second and it'll reward you with a long life!)
 

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I agree with starting let it idle down .great video
 

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I was taught a long time ago not to "gun it" as soon as I started up and to let it warm up a bit before going anywhere.

"Slow down sugar bear. Give the slippery stuff inside, time to get in all the places it needs to be." he said.

This clip re-enforces what I was told makes me glad I listened and followed through.
 

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Let the bike idle for a few seconds before taking off, and go easy on it for the first couple of minutes.
Yup, I've always been in the habit of starting up the bike and letting it idle/warm up while I finish putting on my gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yup, I've always been in the habit of starting up the bike and letting it idle/warm up while I finish putting on my gear.
Your bike will thank you! And if our bikes are anything like this engine, I think this would reinforce a behavior of making sure the first start is an easy one. (Go easy taking off after you get it started, to get the oil worked in everywhere).

Personally, I ride around for a few minutes before taking off hard at all. My Mustang has an LCD screen on the dash that you can rotate through different gauges, and it can take 10 or 15 minutes of 'normal' driving before the oil is warmed up according to the oil temp gauge! (Although it's probably not too cold to matter except for the first couple of minutes on a cold day. But I was surprised at how long it takes the oil to warm up; way way after the water does).
 

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Pretty cool idea. I'm sure there is still a small film of oil on the valves and such before the river gets there so it's not completely metal on metal, but it's pretty thin, so definitely good to let the oil get everywhere before taking off.
 

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Yup, I've always been in the habit of starting up the bike and letting it idle/warm up while I finish putting on my gear.
I was taught as a kid with my first dirtbike, pull it out of the garage (or off the trailer), start it, do not rev it up, then go through the ritual of putting on your helmet, goggles, gloves, boots, etc.

That just carried over to my street bike when I finally bought one.

Thanks for sharing the video! Very educational!
 

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Pretty cool idea. I'm sure there is still a small film of oil on the valves and such before the river gets there so it's not completely metal on metal, but it's pretty thin, so definitely good to let the oil get everywhere before taking off.
That thin layer of oil may contain 1 or more additives to help prevent cold start wear and maybe those additives might be washed away when one adds Seafoam or other such chemicals to the oil?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That thin layer of oil may contain 1 or more additives to help prevent cold start wear and maybe those additives might be washed away when one adds Seafoam or other such chemicals to the oil?
Yeah I think this video reinforces your frequent point about leaving oil alone. We get the image in our heads that oil pumps through the engine like our hearts pump blood; a constant flow where even at the far reaching edges there's a decent bit of pressure and flow. But at idle, especially with a long stroke, it's more burbling and slushing oil around at the bottom than really 'flowing', this motor in the video seems to show what I'd call "oil weeping" much more than "oil flow" until he adds some throttle. So anything that changes the characteristics of that oil seems like a bad idea.

I'm with you on this one Sfair! Unless you've got nothing to lose and a real good reason (Like I mentioned in another thread, clogged valve oiler on a high mileage engine), additives in oil will probably just accelerate wear.
 
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