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I have a vn1700 2011 nomad. If she sits for a few days I always have condensation from the pipes on start up. What causes it? Can it be eliminated? Any harm?
Thanks
 

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If it doesnt have a sweet smell, it should be no problem. A sweet smell will probably be anti freeze. Have you ever seen the exhaust on a car that is cold, you can get quite a bit of moisture out of the exhaust shortly after startup.
 

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For every gallon of gasoline your bike burns, it expels a gallon of H2O out the pipes. Normal.
 

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I do wonder if this is more prevalent in the humid climes than the desert climes.

I wonder if running a dehumidifier or conditioning the air where the bike is parked would help.
 

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No. The H2O is a result of the chemical reaction when burning the gasoline. Ambient Humidity has nothing to do with it.
 

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If you park your bike on concrete and it's getting colder now your bike is probably drawing the moisture from the concrete. Put a old blanket or a piece carpet under your bike to create a barrier and it should take care of the condensation your bikes getting. This happens to me every year in my garage. Hope this helps!
 

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No. The H2O is a result of the chemical reaction when burning the gasoline. Ambient Humidity has nothing to do with it.
You would think that the hot pipes would continue to evaporate the moisture after combustion has stopped.

I would like to hear from some of our desert riders and their thoughts on condensation.

There are times when everything metal from 2 foot from the floor and down is soaked from condensation in my barn.
 

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I do wonder if this is more prevalent in the humid climes than the desert climes.

I wonder if running a dehumidifier or conditioning the air where the bike is parked would help.
Don't take this as criticism, but this sounds like my wife wanting to air condition the garage where she parks her pampered T-bird that she drives about twice per month, and never in the rain. I guess I should agree if I get to park the bike in the garage next to it instead of in the shed....
 

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I do wonder if this is more prevalent in the humid climes than the desert climes.

I wonder if running a dehumidifier or conditioning the air where the bike is parked would help.
Don't take this as criticism, but this sounds like my wife wanting to air condition the garage where she parks her pampered T-bird that she drives about twice per month, and never in the rain. I guess I should agree if I get to park the bike in the garage next to it instead of in the shed....
I would love a conditioned "man cave". Here in middle Tennessee when it is too hot to ride, it is too hot to work on the bikes. When it is too cold to ride it is too cold to work on the bikes. When the weather is perfect for working on the bikes, I am riding.
 

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dhrider, I agree with you you 100%. I stored a 1972 MGB in the exact spot I now park three bikes. As I worked on the MGB through the winter months that thing was always condensated wet as hell underneath. Before parking the bikes I put two paint drop cloths down and than a POS carpet remnant. ALL moisture is gone. I work on these things every day and have never seen a hint of moisture since. $40 night and day fix - carpet is comfy and forgiving to lay on too.
 

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People don't realize what a concrete floor in cold weather will do to a nice car in storage. It will rust out the frame, a bike is no exception. I don't know about the southern states because they're always in a warmer climate but here you have to watch it or you could end up with rusted pipes over time.
 
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