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I noticed this subject is seldom discussed, but I'm doing it more often these days. When finally learning how to coax a smooth shift through all the gears using the clutch, and that did take about 15K miles, I started clutchless shifting the last three; fourth thru sixth. Throttle control has to be just right to prevent any amount of jerk, which hasn't been mastered in 2nd or 3rd, but in the top three gears it's quick, smooth, and just feels right.

Any thoughts on doing this?
 

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I noticed this subject is seldom discussed, but I'm doing it more often these days. When finally learning how to coax a smooth shift through all the gears using the clutch, and that did take about 15K miles, I started clutchless shifting the last three; fourth thru sixth. Throttle control has to be just right to prevent any amount of jerk, which hasn't been mastered in 2nd or 3rd, but in the top three gears it's quick, smooth, and just feels right.

Any thoughts on doing this?
IMO no problem if done correctly & smoothly! ;) :)
 

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Match your RPMs and should have no problem. Done it myself on my 800 a couple times because was either that or find a tow when the clutch cable broke miles from home. Up shifting is easier than down smoothly, I just blip the throttle a bit as I down shifted.
 

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Do that all the time on our 500. Also usually only 3-4, 4-5, and 5-6. No adverse problems. Downshifts are a little trickier, but can be accomplished by blipping the throttle a tad while shifting. Just think 'SMOOTH' !!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Up shifting w/o the clutch I can handle smoothly but definitely not down shifting - that requires more concentration at matching the rpm(s) than I'm willing to do. I find it too difficult, but if you guys can do it w/o some unwanted tranny noise on your bike, more power to you. I'm not that coordinated.
 

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Any thoughts on doing this?
Hello @redfish

Bikes usually have dog gears (that is a non synchromesh transmission, with cogs that have square teeth). It is more or less safe for the transmission if you float the gears smoothly. However If you are not doing this smoothly you can damage your gearbox. (Do not try this on synchromesh, it will get expensive)

Going up is relatively easy because at the moment of shift your throttle is open with engine at hither revs. As you roll off the throttle and the revs go down the pressure on the cogs is released and the next gear slides in. (hopefully all the way and not just partly engaged. If it is only partly engaged your are for a nasty surprise).

To downshift you have to first release the pressure from the cogs by equalizing the speed of the input from the engine with the speed of the output from the transmission. Then pre-load the next gear down and give it a little flick of a throttle to match the engine input speed with the output of the next gear. It will slide in. (again hopefully it will fully engage)

You can work up to it by tapping the clutch to release the pressure from the cogs and work your way up to the point when it is natural and smooth. Today some bikes come with an electronic assistance for clutch-less shifting. I have never owned or ridden a bike like that.

Personally I do not like floating gears because I am paranoid about A) ruining my transmission by not fully engaging gear or grinding if I make a mistake. And B) because if I have only partial gear engagement I do not want it bounce out of gear for whatever reason. So I give it a tap on the clutch and all is well.

I am not a mechanic, so perhaps that is not possible, and my worries are unfounded. (Mechanics, please chime in and set me straight). I think that if the cogs are not fully engaged than only part of the gear's teeth touch each other while transferring the power to the wheel. Thus they wore out faster and eventually catastrophically fail.
 

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I think that gear ratios have an effect on how tricky this can be. That's why first thru third are so tough to nail. Longer ratios between them. I do it almost all the time from 3rd to 6th, it allows me to lean back on the bike and not have to screw around with the clutch. Have. Fun! It's quite intoxicating. As long as it's not jerky, you should be fine. I've had this bike for about 14,000 miles.
 
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