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Planning a two week trip in August with friends. Going with a passenger and need to pack camping gear, clothes, etc. First time "roughing it" so need advise on best 2-person tent, mattress, sleeping bags considering weight/space restrictions travelling on a stock Voyager. Any add-ons available to carry more gear?
 

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I took a college course called camping and backpacking. I saved all of he power points and can email them to you if you want. Send me a PM with your email or reply on here and I'll get them sent to ya!

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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2 adults, you might be better with a 3 person tent, minimum. A 4 person wouldn't take much more space than that. Are you going to sleep directly on the tent floor? Inflatable air mattress or cots? How cold will it be at night should determine the sleeping bag. Are y'all eating out or cooking your own food?
Gander mountain sells a sleeping bag that squeezes down pretty small. I don't know much about the quality, I think they are ratdd to keep an average person "comfortable" down to 30*. Keep in mind, sleeping bag ratings aren't a guaranteed warmth at __*, they are not muchmore than a "average guess". If you or your passenger are cold natured, get some rated a little lower than you think you might otherwise need. Also, if you're camping in a cool area, air matresses tend to funnel cool air from the ground right up to you. A blanket between your air matress and the floor of the tent will help block the cold.
I recommend a tent with a rain fly that covers all the way to the ground. If it blows in a rain storm, you'll wish you had a rain fly with full coverage. I have the extreme weather 3 man from Cabelas. I like it for me by myself, but I camp alone, and it allows room to keep all my gear inside.
 

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I have a marvellas hitch and cargo grate to expand carrying capacity. I also have a show chrome luggage rack with matching bag where I keep rain gear and bike cover. Even though Kawasaki says not to, you could strap light items like thermorest self inflating air mattresses to the chrome saddlebag lid racks.

If you want light and compact gear, be prepared to spend the money.
 

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Planning a two week trip in August with friends. Going with a passenger and need to pack camping gear, clothes, etc. First time "roughing it" so need advise on best 2-person tent, mattress, sleeping bags considering weight/space restrictions travelling on a stock Voyager. Any add-ons available to carry more gear?
If you get all that on your bike, please post a picture. My girl and I usually take two bikes to get all that gear. We recently sold hers as she has decided to stop riding so I figure camping days on the bike are behind us. That's why I would like to see a pic.
 

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+1 for a 'bigger tent'. A two person tent means that two average sized people people laying pressed up against one another side-by-side can fit. Tents pack small and you may want to consider a bigger tent, one big enough to get dressed in if it's raining! (You are on a motorcycle after all). Probably not an issue in August, but know too that temperature ratings on sleeping bags and the like are "survivable", not "comfortable". If a sleeping bag says it's rated for 40F, it means you won't die if the temps reach 40. But it won't be comfortable, you'll be freezing. (Probably not an issue in august, but you never know)

Coleman has some cool 'instant tents' that go up really fast, and are big. Big enough to almost stand up in if you need to get dressed, and pack small.
 

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Am I the only one surprised that there is a college course for 'camping'?
Lots of colleges and universities offer those sorts of classes. Mostly for the community to take. Painting, camping, music, heck even how to ride a motorcycle (above and beyond the MSF). Way to make a little extra dough.
 

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Planning a two week trip in August with friends. Going with a passenger and need to pack camping gear, clothes, etc. First time "roughing it" so need advise on best 2-person tent, mattress, sleeping bags considering weight/space restrictions travelling on a stock Voyager. Any add-ons available to carry more gear?
Marvella's trailer hitch and Bunkhouse LX camper. Room for all the gear you could need.
 

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VV will tow a small trailer just fine-I have a Harbor Freight clamshell trailer ($375+-) that holds tent, sleeping bags, air mattress, air pump, ext cords you name it. Everyone usally is amazed at how much came out and wait to see if it all goes back in.2 up, all bags loaded still gets 40+MPG. My hitch was from MC Hitch.com. I swapped out the lights on trailer for LEDs-no overload issue on bike. Used a common 5 to 4 converter on bike. Plenty of threads here on how tio wire the bike.
 

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Yeah I agree. I think the cargo trailer is the way to go, and harbor freight is about the best priced one I've seen.
I agree with the LED light switch, and I'd recommend re-packing the wheel bearing grease, however, if you are only going to use it once, it could probably wait until after one trip.
Have you ever pulled a trailer? Don't mean to question your ability, but it might be a different sensation. If you go that route, I'd suggest getting a trailer first and making some practice runs. Packing the trailer with evenly-distributed weight can help you develope a new talent. But as GONRDN said, you can pack EVERYTHING and have your saddlebags free for rain gear, maps, snacks , tools, etc...
Whiting57 would be the go-to guy for more information about trailers.
 

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On your search engine type in motorcycle camping checklist. Look for Micapeek.com it is a very detailed list and it is even customizable and printable, and free. Go to Gadget's fixit page and he has some tips there as well.
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I have to agree though, with 2 up riding and camping a trailer would seem like the very best solution.
 

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If the powers that be don't mind me mentioning them...you can learn A LOT from motocampers.com
 

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Am I the only one surprised that there is a college course for 'camping'?
I used to be, about a year ago the news was broken to me when a friend of mine announced that he was taking an ONLINE camping course.

Then I reminded myself that my ex wife took a bowling class. Not as an elective or a sport (she did tennis), but as a CLASS.

I'm surprised by nothing anymore.
 

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Camp Gear

Core Camping Gear



Opinions are like farts – everyone has more of them than you’d care to hear and some of them stink to high heaven.
The only sure thing is this: great camping gear is whatever works for you. If these tips help you find that gear, well, this will have been successful.

Tent



Waterproof. You must not have a leaky tent, so either camp in dry weather or make sure your tent is water-tight. In fact, make sure your tent is water-tight even if you expect to camp in dry conditions exclusively. You can’t control the weather, and you can’t guarantee you’ll never get caught in the rain, but you can control the weather-worthiness of your tent.
Set up your tent in your backyard and let it get rained on, or give it the sprinkler test. Check for leaks, mark any problem areas, and treat with spray, tape or sealer as necessary after it dries out.
Free standing. “Free standing” just means that the tent doesn’t depend on a center pole and guy chords to stand up. A free-standing tent will usually have a three- or four-end main-pole. After initial set-up, the whole thing can be moved and oriented as you want. Then it can be staked and guyed as conditions require.
Typically, you'll want to stake your tent and maybe employ a couple guy-lines for the tent to retain its proper shape and tautness.
Occupancy ratings. In the 50’s, the occupancy ratings of tents were determined by teenagers whose calling in life was to see how many of their peers could be crammed into a telephone booth together. Manufacturers applied this unique passion to tent occupancy ratings.
In the 60’s and through most of the 70’s, circus clowns who specialized in packing themselves into miniature cars took over from the phone booth kids. The clowns' contributions to tent occupancy ratings are legendary.
If you are not a teenager or a clown, you’ll want to get a tent with an occupancy rating at least one person more than will ever be in the tent. A 3-person tent seems to serve solo camping needs just fine and easily accommodates two when a pillion tags along.
Stakes. Stakes are a place where some manufacturers skimp to keep costs down. Your initially straight stakes will give way, before long, to arcs and angles and pretzel shapes. Consider investing in some unbendable stakes of stainless steel or titanium.

Sleeping Bag



Temperature rating. The temperature rating of a sleeping bag does not tell you the lowest temperature the bag will keep you toasty warm in, but rather the lowest temperature the bag should allow you to survive without incurring life-threatening hypothermia.
Most veteran campers have learned to take sleeping bag temperature ratings with several grains of salt.
In view of this, get a sleeping bag with a temperature rating at least 15 to 20 degrees lowerthan the coldest temperature you expect ever to camp in. After all, it's always easier to remedy being too warm than being too cold.
A 15 degree bag is usually, though not always, perfectly comfortable between 30-50 degrees, which are the temperatures most bikers commonly camp in. Bring along a second bag, a 40- 50 degree liner bag, when you know the mercury is going to drop, insert the liner bag into your regular bag and stay toasty even in the teens!
Insulation type,The two major choices are synthetic and goose down. Goose down is light and compressible and the traditional favorite of backpackers and mountaineers, but if it gets wet it's useless until it dries out.
Synthetic tends to be inexpensive and insulate well even if damp, unlike down. But they are invariably heavier and larger-packing than Down bags.
Shape, There are "mummy" bags and "rectangular" bags. The distinctive feature of a mummy bag is that it tapers toward the foot box, keeping interior volume to a minimum. Your body will heat a mummy bag more efficiently than a full foot box rectangular bag because there is less space to heat. A mummy will be lighter and pack smaller but will feel more restrictive. A rectangular sleeping bag will allow more movement but will not heat as efficiently, especially in severe weather.

Pillow



Sleeping can be hell without a decent pillow, but for some reason, a lot of motorcycle campers start out figuring they don't need one.
Just about everyone, it seems, starts with a rolled-up riding jacket and experiments with various combinations of folded apparel in search of the right elevation and softness.
Sooner or later they realize that a real pillow is necessary. Camping pillows come in fleece, down, foam and inflatable.

Sleeping Pad/Mat



Types, There are two basic choices: semi-self inflating and non-self inflating. Semi-self inflating pads have a foam core that draws in air when the valve is opened. Non-self inflating pads have an air chamber and need to be inflated with a pump or by mouth.
Semi-self inflating pads tend to be well-insulating but aren't as lightweight, small-packing or as cushy as air-chamber pads.
Your body weight will mash down the underside insulation of your sleeping bag and thus negate its r-value, so you’ve got to have a well-insulated sleeping pad underneath you to prevent heat loss.
Without a well-insulated sleeping pad, you are basically trying to heat the ground rather than your sleep environment.

Chair



Camp once without a chair and you’ll realize that a chair is a basic, must-have piece of equipment, not an optional luxury. For those who need to pack very small and very light, a three legged folding stool will be better than the ground. Choose wisely.

Stove



Carry a stove of some type, because it's nice to be able to boil water for coffee, tea, hot chocolate or ramen, or to heat a can of soup or stew. Your starter stove needs to be easy to operate and maintain, compact and efficient. For some motorcycle campers, a more advanced stove and cook kit is needed because the experience just wouldn't be complete without real cooking going on.
 
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