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Discussion Starter #1
So, yesterday during a quick inspection of my air pressure in my rear tire, I noticed that my rotor looked a bit rough. As I further inspected it, I found that my rear brakes looked like they were out of pad and sure enough, after removing the caliper, I found them to be metal to metal..... Now this is the second set of rear brakes to be put on my kaw. I change out the first pair around 18,000 but didn't see the kind of wear that I experienced over the last 14,000 miles... My rotor is trashed, so I have a new one ordered. My question is, does it sound right to have the pads completely worn down in 14,000 miles or should I be suspecting that the caliper is not releasing enough to keep from contacting the rotor..... I am going to pull the caliper and take it inside to the work bench to get a real good look at it, and wonder what I should be looking for..... I did notice that my rear brake fluid looks a little low, and I have heard the rear brake rubbing ever since changing it out last time, just a little, which I thought would go away once the brake pads set to the rotor.... Any advice would be helpful......
 

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Right foot resting on the brake pedal, causing a very slight drag?
 

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Build up on the piston surface, not allowing the piston to move freely? Piston rotating slightly in the cylinder after the last pad change, not allowing the piston to move correctly? Binding in the linkage to the reservoir, not allowing the linkage to fully disengage and thus keeping false positive pressure in the reservoir?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, the results are in.... I took the caliper off and found the problem right away. Looks like the spring pad,,, part # 92145 somehow got buggered up on the one end. I think it was keeping the inside pad from retracting, which caused both pads to wear quickly. I've disassembled the cylinders to replace the two packing gaskets per cylinder, and the caliper boots, so once I get all the parts in, I should be good to go... I checked out the cylinders, which had a little roughness on the outsides towards the outside edge, but the rest of them looked good once out of the caliper. No scoring on the inside that I could see, so hopefully once I get them back together all will be in working order....

One question King43, you mention the piston rotating slightly in the cylinder.... is there a specific way to re-insert the pistons into the cylinder upon reassembly? I really don't see any specific way to insert them.....
 

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Not that I am aware of; I was just thinking in the realm of all possibility that if there were any guides in the cylinder that a rotation may have caused them to ride on top of instead of in.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
King 43, thanks for the feedback. I'll let you know how things go back together once I get all the parts in..... Hopefully by Friday the parts will arrive for a weekend fix-er-upper. I reseated the old seals just to see how hard it will be to get the piston to go through and was pleasantly surprised that it was not all that hard to get the piston to thread through them....
 

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Remember...no petroleum based products to be used on ANY braking component! That includes solvents for cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
sfair, thanks for the quantifier..... I dabbed some brake fluid on the rubber seals and the piston to give it some lubrication before inserting..... I assume that is OK as it needs something to allow it to slip through the rubber rings...... Also, it looks like they use grease on the two metal shafts that the brake glides on to open and shut, in the rubber boots....
 

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Brake fluid works good for both cleaning and lube.
Any grease used will have to be "special grease for brakes". Available anywhere.
 

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sfair, thanks for the quantifier..... I dabbed some brake fluid on the rubber seals and the piston to give it some lubrication before inserting..... I assume that is OK as it needs something to allow it to slip through the rubber rings...... Also, it looks like they use grease on the two metal shafts that the brake glides on to open and shut, in the rubber boots....
The grease on the sliding parts is correct although it should be a high temperature grease. What sfair is refering to are the pistons and the internals of the caliper. Use Simple Green for cleaning a caliper and pistons and you won't regret it.
 

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What sfair is refering to are the pistons and the internals of the caliper.
No.... what I am refering to is ANY brake part should have the correct grease applied including sliders, pins, etc. No excuse for not using the correct lube as it is cheap and available anywhere.
And I would NOT apply grease to any internal parts. Brake fluid only!
 

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No.... what I am refering to is ANY brake part should have the correct grease applied including sliders, pins, etc. No excuse for not using the correct lube as it is cheap and available anywhere.
And I would NOT apply grease to any internal parts. Brake fluid only!
That's what I said. sfair, you need to chill.
 

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That's what I said. sfair, you need to chill.
You did not read my post correctly and I stand by what I said.

No petroleum products to touch ANY braking component. Inside, outside, anywhere.

When it comes to brake repairs, I become anal and for good reason...everyone's safety depends on it!!! So chill I will not.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, thanks to all for the information on brakes.... Parts came in on Friday and it took all of about 30 minutes to rebuild the caliper, install and pressurize the brake. That's one of the beauties of this model bike, it's so easy for a half/ass mechanic to work on them.... Plus a lot of advice from this forum. Took a little longer to pull off the rear tire and replace the rotor, but I needed to clean the spokes anyways... So, I've put about 80 miles now on the brake pads, so another couple of miles and they should be broke in. Sure does make a difference not having any drag anymore.... I'll have to check my gas mileage to see if the dragging brake was causing a reduction....
 

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Good work on the safe repair. I get called out all of the time on my "replace the rubber parts" policy, but those parts can become contaminated by many ways...maybe by a previous owner, etc. and if the system is giving trouble and you have it apart, it is an automatic replace, just for peace of mind regardless of the other reasons. It does not take much rubber swelling to put a bind on the various parts and then there is a problem!
 

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You did not read my post correctly and I stand by what I said.

No petroleum products to touch ANY braking component. Inside, outside, anywhere.

When it comes to brake repairs, I become anal and for good reason...everyone's safety depends on it!!! So chill I will not.
HAHAHA!!!!

Yup I'm a 9 yr old sometimes
 

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It is pretty interesting that you had to do the rear brakes at 18,000 at all in the first place. I did my fronts this November with about 19,000 and they barely needed to be done. (previous thread Brake Work) The new ones weren't much thicker. The only reason I didn't leave the old ones on was there was a small chunk missing on a pad. The rears were even better. The biggest issue I noticed was the condition of the brake fluid. It was like used diesel engine oil.
 
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