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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guess what this is:
249774


I was installing a set of handlebar risers today.
I set my torque wrench to 34 N m like the manual says and started to tighten the bolts.
I had to apply a lot of force and I started thinking that maybe the manual was wrong.
Suddenly I felt and heard this "snap!", (not the usual click of the torque wrench).
Then the bolt starts spinning freely so obviously something went wrong.
When I removed the bolt, it came with this thing. It's the thread from the handlebar holder. 馃槴

It turns out my torque wrench is broken. It doesn't click even at the lowest setting.
I kept applying pressure and destroyed the thread on an $85 part (with shipping).
Plus I also have to buy a new torque wrench. :(
 

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One of mine is a Tekton. Jeez, I thought they were OK. I guess your bad experience can be a reminder to us to check our wrenches on a 'test bolt' once in a while. Sorry about the expense you're stuck with. Sucks.
 

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I have a 5/8's nut welded to a plate that bolts to the side of my toolbox, everytime I use my torque wrench, I set it on 10 ft/pds, then 40 ft/pds, and check that it clicks....I do this with my 1/4, 3/8s, and 1/2" torque Wrenches. I have both the click, and the newer beep wrenches....I do have some checking standards, I have tags that I put on them showing they've been certified checked....
I use a Precision Instruments 1/2 " drive torque comparator in my tool box to check my wrenches at the dealership, but I have used these to doublecheck....
https://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-ARM6...qid=1622934508&sourceid=Mozilla-search&sr=8-8
I use a ratchet to hit 40 ft/pds, then 60 ft/pds. (2 diff bolts), then I check them against my clickers and beepers. If things start looking wierd, I use my Precision Instruments tester....which was way over $200....but you need it building/repairing alot of bikes....
 

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2020 Kawasaki Vulcan S, 2020 Kawasaki Z900
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I fix cars for a living, torque wrenches slow me down, 1/2" impact gun for every bolt, especially those little 6mm thread pitches!!! 馃槀 I have 3 snap on torque wrenches in the 3 main drives, all but 1/4" are digital and also do angle measurements, over the years the bottom cap that closes in the batteries got messed up, the metal ring around it cracked and made it a pain to turn on, had to solder the connection back, but their accuracy has held up. My little one is an old school dial one, no clicks but has a needle and gauge as you turn it, in-lb only, also very accurate.
 

Administrator "Loose Nut"
Houston, Texas
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I have a Craftsman 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 torque wrenchs. I stripped out way too many fasteners in my younger days and spent way to much time putting in helicores. I use a torque wrenches now.

249777
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
... and wouldn't you know it. The thing started clicking again after a few test tries. I don't know if I can trust it's accuracy though.
I might still have to buy a new one. But for the light use I put on it I can't really justify buying one of those $200 ones.
 

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Always, I mean always back off your calibration dial, return it to -0-, and keep them from grit, keep them oiled, never drop them....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Always, I mean always back off your calibration dial, return it to -0-, and keep them from grit, keep them oiled, never drop them....
Yes, I always store it at the lowest setting and keep it in it's case. However, it's been two years since I sold my previous bike, and I recently bought the Vulcan. Looks like two years of not using it made it lock up.
 

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Guess what this is:
View attachment 249774

I was installing a set of handlebar risers today.
I set my torque wrench to 34 N m like the manual says and started to tighten the bolts.
I had to apply a lot of force and I started thinking that maybe the manual was wrong.
Suddenly I felt and heard this "snap!", (not the usual click of the torque wrench).
Then the bolt starts spinning freely so obviously something went wrong.
When I removed the bolt, it came with this thing. It's the thread from the handlebar holder. 馃槴

It turns out my torque wrench is broken. It doesn't click even at the lowest setting.
I kept applying pressure and destroyed the thread on an $85 part (with shipping).
Plus I also have to buy a new torque wrench. :(
At the risk of overstating;
Common practice is that if a bolt is binding, back out , use lubricant on the threads, check for burrs, or evidence of crossthreading, and try again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
At the risk of overstating;
Common practice is that if a bolt is binding, back out , use lubricant on the threads, check for burrs, or evidence of crossthreading, and try again.
But the bolt wasn't binding. It was still going, just tighter than the specified 34Nm.
 

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Yeah those Torque-wrenches can be tricky. I recently torqued up my oil drain plug. Set the wrench to the value stated in the service manual and started tightening. After a bit I was like 'this doesn't feel right'. Sure enough after testing the wrench on another bolt it didn't click ! Lucky me that I stopped when I felt something is wrong. Pans out that the wrench is quite unreliable on the lowest end of its scale. Guess paying good money for a better quality one pays of in the long run.
 

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Even higher end torque wrenches (non-digital) will generally state in manual that they are most accurate from 20%-80% of their stated range and that the upper/lower 20% should not be used for precise measurements. You can usually see the deviation on the calibration sheet they come with.
 
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