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Good afternoon to all. I just picked up my new 2010 Voyager Red and Black ABS yesterday, (traded my 2005 Vulcan 2000 for it). The manual says not to go over 2500 rpm's for the first 1000 miles or so. The question I have is is that really necessary? It seems that at highway speeds it will exceed 2500 rpm's. How did you guys ride during break-in? Are the engines that sensitive? I'm pleased with the power, but need to get used to the new torque curve. I am around 6ft tall and 295 lbs, what air pressure does similar sized riders have in their tires and shocks?
 

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i rode my vaquero normal..........going up through the gears i tried not to get above 2500 rpm's but oh well if it did. as far as highway riding i tried not to hold a steady 2300/2500 rpm for long periods of time. i always tried to stop every 30 or so miles and let it rest for 10/15 mins. and shoot the bull with the guys before starting back up. had dealer service at 600 miles and never looked back.
 

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Good afternoon to all. I just picked up my new 2010 Voyager Red and Black ABS yesterday, (traded my 2005 Vulcan 2000 for it). The manual says not to go over 2500 rpm's for the first 1000 miles or so. The question I have is is that really necessary? It seems that at highway speeds it will exceed 2500 rpm's. How did you guys ride during break-in? Are the engines that sensitive? I'm pleased with the power, but need to get used to the new torque curve. I am around 6ft tall and 295 lbs, what air pressure does similar sized riders have in their tires and shocks?
Check out my post #3 on this link.
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=17828
 

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ok i guess..........looks really good and installation is a snap even for those not used to turning wrenches. though i do get a good bit of popping/backfiring when you let off the throttle sometimes. i have been told here on the boards its due to it being too lean. im going to check with my dealer to see if there is different mapping for the ECU avail. to get it right. who knows may just purchase a fuel processor and be done with it.
 

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I follow the manufactures instructions. Big Reyn the 2500 rpm is 70 mph on the freeway, at least that's what my Vaquero does. One key is don't stay at the same speed, vary your speed and once in a while let off the throttle for a 2-3 seconds and then resume speed. My Vaquero says 2500 rpm for the 1st 500 miles and the 3500 rpm for the next 500 miles. Is the Voyager different?
 

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Good afternoon to all. I just picked up my new 2010 Voyager Red and Black ABS yesterday, (traded my 2005 Vulcan 2000 for it). The manual says not to go over 2500 rpm's for the first 1000 miles or so. The question I have is is that really necessary? It seems that at highway speeds it will exceed 2500 rpm's. How did you guys ride during break-in? Are the engines that sensitive? I'm pleased with the power, but need to get used to the new torque curve. I am around 6ft tall and 295 lbs, what air pressure does similar sized riders have in their tires and shocks?
Oh Boy... here we go... :eek:
next to putting CT's on Cruisers, you've just launched into the second most controversial topic there is regarding Motorcycles!! so get ready for some real differences of opinion and good luck sorting it all out in the end...

I have two bikes... a 09 1700 Nomad and a 09 650 KLR...

I broke the nomad in according to Kaw owners manual specs... after 16000 miles I have had no issues with it and it burns NO oil... I did this break-in prior to reading the article davidsheek refers to...

I got my KLR 2 months after getting the 1700, I broke it in using the method davidsheek refers to... after 8000 miles, the KLR burns some oil, but KLRs are known for burning oil anyway, especially at hiway speeds, so I have to say that I'm undecided on which method is better... it's your bike, break it in the way you want, may be fewer warranty issues by following the manual??, hard to say... good luck on whatever method you decide on... rick


ohh and welcome to the "asylum"!! :D:D
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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which came first, the oil or the hardley..?

Oh Boy... here we go... :eek:
next to putting CT's on Cruisers, you've just launched into the second most controversial topic there is regarding Motorcycles!! so get ready for some real differences of opinion and good luck sorting it all out in the end...
ohh and welcome to the "asylum"!! :D:D
break in procedures rate the #2 spot? ct's are #1?... I beg to differ.. am thinking oil vs hardleys get top billing. ct's are #3 at best. break ins are a felony.. but have used mototune method on a dozen motors and have no oil burn/use issues. tite as a drum. would not even consider the OLD take it ez method. i didnt say "beat on it". just put the rings under pressure and release. consistantly build pressure and release for the first couple hunerd miles, pushes them rings into the HONEing on the cyl walls. makes em fit titer n drum. is all . ponchout
 

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I guess I just figure if the manufacture recommends it there must be a reason. This is not just limited to motorcycles, you can look at hundreds of products and the manufactures all recommend how to use their products. That's all I was saying.

Enjoy your Voyager, I was real close to getting one but the deal on the Vaquero was to good to pass up.
 

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break in procedures rate the #2 spot? ct's are #1?... I beg to differ.. am thinking oil vs hardleys get top billing. ct's are #3 at best. break ins are a felony.. but have used mototune method on a dozen motors and have no oil burn/use issues. tite as a drum. would not even consider the OLD take it ez method. i didnt say "beat on it". just put the rings under pressure and release. consistantly build pressure and release for the first couple hunerd miles, pushes them rings into the HONEing on the cyl walls. makes em fit titer n drum. is all . ponchout
:D:D:D:D:D:D: depends on which forum your on I guess and what your personal passions are...

break in procedures are a huge topic on the KLR forum...

and yes; oil discussions can get passionate...

I never had a desire to own a Hardly MC, I like to ride my cruiser, not work on it all time ;),

but your are right, passions run high on many topics in the motorcycle world... and this is one of em'! :bulgy-eyes:
 

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but your are right, passions run high on many topics in the motorcycle world... and this is one of em'! :bulgy-eyes:
ss, in yor avatar,, so just who is the honey running all over that... 305 dream?
 

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When I picked up my 2009 Voyager from the dealer (it was new) I drove it like it wasn't mine from the first shift lots of rpm over 4000. I did not baby the motor and today it just rolled over 50,000 kilometers runs great doesn't use any oil and I did go to full synthetic on the 2nd oil change
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Rusty360, the Voyager has the same break in procedures as the Vaquero. Thanks everyone for all of your helpful input. I didn't mean to start another controversy, and unless the warranty will be voided I see a CT in the Voyager's future. I had one on my V2K and loved it. Rusty I was looking at the Vaquero but decided on the Voyager simply because of storage space.
 

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Big Reyn, I agree storage space is a huge plus but since I was dreaming thinking my wife would be going with me (do to health problems) that leaves me a solo cruiser for the most part. I was going to get a voyager but the Vaquero had everything I needed to travel. Hope you like it, I have really been enjoying mine.
 

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I generally ride it like I stole it off and on. No oil problems.
 

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is this correct ?

I am in the break-in process , I wasn't convinced about not using synthetic after the first oil change ? I started looking for the best oil I can find that can stand both engine & transmission , I found an article that compared casrtrol gtx with mobil 1 and conventional oil , in conclusion , mobil 1 retains it viscosity of about 83% after 1500 miles , then I went to mobil site and I saw this quote ,


Is it true that new engines need break-in periods using conventional motor oil?

That is a myth. In the past, engine break-in was necessary to remove metal flashing or any other abrasive material left inside the engine after machining, as well as to allow the valves and rings to "seat" properly. Today's engines are built with much tighter tolerances, much improved machining, and under much cleaner conditions compared to the engines of 10 or 20 years ago. Current engine manufacturing technology does not require a break-in period using petroleum-based motor oils.


is this correct ?.?
 

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That information is very specific to automobiles. However, I would believe that present day motorcycle engines are manufactured under similar tolerance situations.

The main difference is that you need to consider the whole wet clutch issue with a MC and you should only use a quality MC oil. In my perspective, that is the only real requirement - dino or synth are a personal preference.

Personally, I use Castrol or Mobil 10/40 or 20/50 MC synthetic oil. Just 2 cents to throw in the jar.
 

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I am in the break-in process , I wasn't convinced about not using synthetic after the first oil change ? I started looking for the best oil I can find that can stand both engine & transmission , I found an article that compared casrtrol gtx with mobil 1 and conventional oil , in conclusion , mobil 1 retains it viscosity of about 83% after 1500 miles , then I went to mobil site and I saw this quote ,


Is it true that new engines need break-in periods using conventional motor oil?

That is a myth. In the past, engine break-in was necessary to remove metal flashing or any other abrasive material left inside the engine after machining, as well as to allow the valves and rings to "seat" properly. Today's engines are built with much tighter tolerances, much improved machining, and under much cleaner conditions compared to the engines of 10 or 20 years ago. Current engine manufacturing technology does not require a break-in period using petroleum-based motor oils.


is this correct ?.?
You should be carefull about what oil you put in your bike. There are two important things to consider. One is that it is a oil disigned for higher fricton (because of the transmition) and that code is "JASO MA2". More info here:
http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=83732
The other is an oil that is designed to be used with wet clutches. Example: ISO-L-EMA2 More info here; http://www.amsoil.com/techservicesbulletin/SmallEngine/TSB SE-2008-01-01 Wet-Clutch Operation and Lubrication Requirements.pdf
 

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Good afternoon to all. I just picked up my new 2010 Voyager Red and Black ABS yesterday, (traded my 2005 Vulcan 2000 for it). The manual says not to go over 2500 rpm's for the first 1000 miles or so. The question I have is is that really necessary? It seems that at highway speeds it will exceed 2500 rpm's. How did you guys ride during break-in? Are the engines that sensitive? I'm pleased with the power, but need to get used to the new torque curve. I am around 6ft tall and 295 lbs, what air pressure does similar sized riders have in their tires and shocks?
Hummm! I thought breakin was 600mls and after oil change good to go!!!
 
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