Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was polishing the rear wheels and rotors on my 9-- to my surprise the caliper housing moves back and forth by about 1/8". I check the front brake caliper and likewise it moves by about the same amount.

I try to tighten the 2 outside bolts that seem to hold the front and nada. The rear-- I have to use an allen wrench tomorrow for the 2 outer bolts that appear to hold the housing to the bracket. They seem to be tight but have yet to try and tighten. I don't know if there are inner bolts to tighten.

Is this housing really a moving part? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
I think you will find that is normal for a disc brake. It has to be able to move a little to self-center when the brake is applied so that it doesn't put pressure on only one side of the disc. Normally when you find that only one disc pad is wearing out of the pair, then the problem is that the calipers have become seized up by grease, dirt, etc and can't move back & forth like yours do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
They are designed to sort of "float" over the rotors, so they will have a little movement in them when brakes are not activated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What was a nagging question yesterday has become invaluable information today. Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
When you first reassemble most disc brakes (including these) the caliper will slide back and forth. As stated above, it needs to do this to equalize the pressure between the inboard and outboard pads. Once you "pump up the brakes" the pads stay in contact with the disc and freeplay should be reduced considerably; unless you apply enough pressure against the caliper to push the pistons back in.

This will seem odd to you if you previously worked on brakes that had inboard and outboard pistons (like my '77 GS750). Those were solid mount, but a bear to work on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Yep, what we got here are called "floating calipers".

The floating caliper is designed to move laterally on its mount.
This movement allows the caliper to maintain a centered position with
respect to the rotor. This design also permits the braking force to
be applied equally to both sides of the rotor. (quoted from here)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top