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I have an 09 classic and im heading to Tennessee this weekend, what's the best way to strap down my bike and not damage anything for that far of a trip, it will be on a trailer. I haven't had to strap this one down before and just curious of the best places to put the straps. Thanks.
 

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Sitting on the seat and your hands on the handle bars.
...........
OK, now that I have that out of my system. The straps need to be attached at or to the frame, not the handle bars. When I have to trailer mine, (when it is sick) I attach straps to the frame down tubes in front of the motor and anchor them of course to the trailer. On the back I typically attach them to the contact point between the backrest and bracket it attaches to. I use padded or loop straps so there are no marks to the paint or on the bike. My bike weighs 700 pounds approximately. All four of my straps are rated at 1000 pounds each. Tighten the straps enough to compress the shocks slightly. DO NOT just crank them down until they stop, you will blow out the seals on the shocks.

I secure my bike and double check the straps before I drive off. I stop in about 10 miles and recheck the straps, usually you will need to adjust or tighten them one or two clicks. The driver handbook says to check your mirrors about every 6 - 10 seconds. That is about how often I check my mirrors to make sure my bike is right where I put it.

When you stop for gas, check the straps. Common sense will tell you the straps may not need to be tightened, but check them to make sure they have not come loose or slipped, you bike doesn't slide or fall, that will ruin your day quickly.

Also you can Google how to tie down a bike on a trailer or in a pick up and get pictures with the explanation. Be safe.
 

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I have used these many times, no hooks on your metal, no scratches, they are easy to use and are available at most bike shops.

 

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I have a wheel chock on a piece if plywood I put in the back of my pickup. Once the front wheel is in it, I strap it down by the handlebars. I pull the front end down maybe 2-3 inches (like Dean said, snug but not so tight it will screw up your front seals) with a ratcheting strap on one side and a regular one on the other. I run another ratcheting strap across the back, wrapping it around one of the spokes of the rear (cast) wheel. The rear one seems unnecessary, but it just seems like something I should do. I check the straps when I stop. Never had any problems.

And just cuz no one has said it: DO NOT put a cover on the bike. It will flap around and really damage the paint.
 

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Made a trip from the Canadian prairies east to the maritimes last year. Approximately
8500k's there and back. Trailered our bikes without incident. I have an '06 900 classic. I anchored a block under the frame. Tied the front down with ratcheting straps from the lower fork, just above the fender mounts, down to the anchors on the wheel chock. At the back I tied down with ratcheting straps from the frame, just above the passenger pegs, down and outward to floor anchors. I tightened the straps to hold the bike down solid, basically became a part of the trailer. Checked the straps early on and then every time we fuelled up. They never moved. They would have survived the rollover test I'm sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advice guys, I knew all the basics such as checking and re checking straps. But regardless thanks for the info, I hope she makes it down there and back safely.
 

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Trailered our bikes many times. Trial and error! Currently using "self-tightening ratchet straps". Sort of like a seat belt. If bike moves or bounces, straps will tighten. I don't have a sissy bar or luggage rack, so I remove seat and strap to frame there. Straps are angled down and back. Use front wheel chock with strap over tire (under fender) and tightened. No need to use straps on front end when tire tightened down like this. Husband attaches his bike from back luggage rack. Found a video on you tube showing similar setup. Here's the link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9szax4vSyM

Used regular ratchet straps, but they always seemed to loosen. :confused:
 

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Cinch straps vs Ratchet straps.. big diff

Used regular ratchet straps, but they always seemed to loosen. :confused:
kg,, wat some call Regular ratchet straps are not ratchet but Cinch Straps and yes they can loosen their gripp..

real ratchet straps are just that ratchet, they CANNOT loosen w/o being manually released.
 

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Yep, the last two pictures would be the "regular ratchet straps" I was referring to.
 

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Let's not forget about tying off the remainder of the straps, after you're done securing your load.
I don't know how many times I see somebody with the wind socks going down the highway. Probably end up with a couple new rub marks by the time they get home.
 

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Just make sure to ratchet 2 or 3 wraps around the ratchet spindle. When hauling our bikes for the first time in an enclosed trailer, I used four straps per bike, hooked up the ratchet strap, pulled the strap tight and gave it a couple of ratchets. Drove for an hour and checked the bikes, all the straps were loose and the bikes leaning over, another five miles and it would have been catastrophic. The bikes would have comingled due to our rough Alberta pavement. Lesson learned, 2 or 3 wraps and no problems.
 

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Put my nomad on a open cargo trailer,2 loop ties on ratchet straps,from handle bars down to anchors,2 ratchet straps from rear bag guards to anchors,made sure it was straight,cinched down couple of inches,bike never moved in the 125 miles
 
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