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2010 Vulcan 900 custom se
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13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Should I get the 1.25 amp or the .75 amp model for my stock 900 custom without any accessories yet
 

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I have been using the 1.25 amp for decades. Running four Battery Tenders right now. They seem to crap out in about seven to eight years. The amount of accessories you have doesn’t factor into which battery charger you need. Makes the batteries on my bike, mower, and tractor last 5 years or more. I think they still come with a five year warranty.
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut"
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Either one will work fine, just make sure and get one with auto cut off, overcharging a battery will actually cook it causing a shorter battery life. A tender is a slow, low amp device that's keeps a battery up to full charge, it's not intended to charge a dead battery.
 

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It'll do it though. I've recharged a dead battery in my truck with a Battery Tender Jr. It did take almost two days to complete, but it did it.
 
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2011 Kawasaki Voyager 1700 Abs
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It'll do it though. I've recharged a dead battery in my truck with a Battery Tender Jr. It did take almost two days to complete, but it did it.
I have a Duracell 4 Amp Charger/Maintainer, maintains the battery of my truck fully charged without overcharging it. Do not drive the truck that much. When we went on vacation for a month it kept the battery of my other bike ( VStar 650 ) fully charged. So far I haven't had any problems.
 

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Most Battery Tenders are not designed to charge batteries. They are designed to trickle charge and MAINTAIN an already charged battery.
There are a couple of models that will charge and maintain a battery. I have a four bank model that has the charging feature. I keep three to four batteries on it all winter.
 

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The OP asked about the amperage for a battery tender, and I agree that it doesn't make a difference, so long as (as others have said) one understands the different ways trickle chargers and chargers work. Trickle chargers will do the job of charging a low voltage battery (if the battery will still hold the charge); it just does it slowly because of the low amperage. But full on chargers can be dangerous if misused as battery maintainers, because many don't have automatic cut-off features. So you're charging at a high amperage, and it just keeps going rather than "trickling" the charge consistently then cutting off when the battery is fully charged.

I've used Battery Tender brand trickle chargers (Full Size and Junior models) successfully on bikes, scooters, and underused cars for years. I have three such chargers now for 5 vehicles, and I switch them around. They all do a treat.

@jwt873 raises an interesting point about sulfation that can occur if a battery is maintained at a constant state of full charge, such as on a trickle charger all winter. In my experience, this is a real thing. I killed a new battery that way once. Which is why pricier tenders (like the one he links) will "pulse" or stop topping off the battery from time to time. You can get the same effect by just unplugging your battery tender for a day or two every couple weeks. The battery only loses on average about 1% per day, so letting it drop a smidge then come back to full charge on the tender is sufficient to keep the battery from discharging (a no-no) and is actually better for the battery than just leaving it on the trickle charger for a long time.
 
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