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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

One simple question:

To get access to the back wheel axle nut, do we need to completely remove the mufflers?
I believe front and back (upper, lower) are jointed ...

Thanks
 

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Hi everyone,

One simple question:

To get access to the back wheel axle nut, do we need to completely remove the mufflers?
I believe front and back (upper, lower) are jointed ...

Thanks
Don't remove them at all, just remove the cotter pin, slip an open end wrench behind the mufflers and onto the nut, then turn the axle bolt itself from the opposite side with a wrench or socket.
 

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Don't remove them at all, just remove the cotter pin, slip an open end wrench behind the mufflers and onto the nut, then turn the axle bolt itself from the opposite side with a wrench or socket.
+1. Have pulled my rear wheel twice now, and this works great.
 

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Don't remove them at all, just remove the cotter pin, slip an open end wrench behind the mufflers and onto the nut, then turn the axle bolt itself from the opposite side with a wrench or socket.
+1. Have pulled my rear wheel twice now, and this works great.
I've thought about this just looking at the situation as a future occurrance. But what are you guys using to get a torque wrench on the axle nut upon reassembly, a crows foot and torque extension calc ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Right! the whole idea is that you should be able to remove the rear wheel without disassembling half the bike!
Thanks Pacomutt, this is clever, why didn't I think of that!

But as RWB said and was my next question, how do you torque it back?:confused:
 

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I've thought about this just looking at the situation as a future occurrance. But what are you guys using to get a torque wrench on the axle nut upon reassembly, a crows foot and torque extension calc ?
Just torque the axle bolt while you hold the nut stationary. OK, OK, I know what you're thinking. That by turning the axle instead of the nut, there is enough added drag to affect the torque. It's really not that critical, besides you can just add say 5 foot pounds, or you can just torque to spec, and you'll probably have to tighten a little more to line up the nut for the cotter pin anyway. Don't over think it. Before you reassemble everything, make sure the axle shaft is lubed, as well as the area under the bolt head and the nut where they will be rotating against the adjusters. That will minimize the drag when you torque the axle.
 

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Just torque the axle bolt while you hold the nut stationary. OK, OK, I know what you're thinking. That by turning the axle instead of the nut, there is enough added drag to affect the torque. It's really not that critical, besides you can just add say 5 foot pounds, or you can just torque to spec, and you'll probably have to tighten a little more to line up the nut for the cotter pin anyway. Don't over think it. Before you reassemble everything, make sure the axle shaft is lubed, as well as the area under the bolt head and the nut where they will be rotating against the adjusters. That will minimize the drag when you torque the axle.
Ok, I'm aware of the add 3 to 5 lbs street rule for the bolt. When I get home I will have to go out in the garage and look again but I thought the left side (bolt side) was also unaccessible with a torque wrench (without removing the muffler).

There is plenty of room on both sides for a wrench or crows foot extender but just going on visual memory it did not look to be enough room to get the rachet head of my torque wench and a socket on either. Hopefully I will be pleasantly surprised when I look at it.
 

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open-end box wrench on that nut will round off the corners, use a socket because that nut needs a lot of torque
Well that's a good point on 80 ft lbs. Could find or make a box end torque extender to cover that aspect.

But I'm still remembering there not being any more room for a torque wrench on the left side than the right (without removing mufflers) Will see when I get home.
 

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open-end box wrench on that nut will round off the corners, use a socket because that nut needs a lot of torque
Not true at all. A properly sized open end wrench won't harm the nut at all; besides it's only holding the nut from turning while you're torquing the axle.
Even if you used an open end wrench to apply all the torque to the nut, 80 ft pounds is nothing for a wrench that size.
I'm talking about a quality wrench; not something you found in the tool pouch on the bike!
 

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Well I'm at home now and got out my torque wrench and put the socket on it the size of the left side bolt head. The bolt head is a smaller size than the nut on the right side, but my torque wrench will not fit into the area with the muffler still on.

So this moves us back to the previous determination. Either take the bags and mufflers off OR use a wrench torque extender to torque it back on.

While a torque extender is an extremely useful addition to the tool box, not everyone has one in either the bolt or the nut size. But without removing the mufflers you will need one or else your torque wrench must have a smaller rachet head than mine (a Sears 0 thru 80 lbs). Actually the one I use on the axle is a larger Harbor Freight 50 thru 150 lbs, since I don't like to actually torque the highest setting of a T-wrench. Least ways not a clicker. I might do the max on a rail wrench.
 

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Well I'm at home now and got out my torque wrench and put the socket on it the size of the left side bolt head. The bolt head is a smaller size than the nut on the right side, but my torque wrench will not fit into the area with the muffler still on.

So this moves us back to the previous determination. Either take the bags and mufflers off OR use a wrench torque extender to torque it back on.

While a torque extender is an extremely useful addition to the tool box, not everyone has one in either the bolt or the nut size. But without removing the mufflers you will need one or else your torque wrench must have a smaller rachet head than mine (a Sears 0 thru 80 lbs). Actually the one I use on the axle is a larger Harbor Freight 50 thru 150 lbs, since I don't like to actually torque the highest setting of a T-wrench. Least ways not a clicker. I might do the max on a rail wrench.
What's the big deal? If you have a bag in the way on the left side, just swing it out of the way or remove it. Forget about trying to get a torque wrench onto the nut on the right side. Obviously the actual torque is not all that important if you still need to turn the nut several degrees to align the cotter pin hole. Once you get a feel for what 70-80 pounds feels like, you can do this in the future without the torque wrench.
You are right that the wrench needs to be matched to the job. If your required torque value falls somewhere in the middle third of the wrench's range you are good.
 

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What's the big deal? If you have a bag in the way on the left side, just swing it out of the way or remove it. Forget about trying to get a torque wrench onto the nut on the right side. Obviously the actual torque is not all that important if you still need to turn the nut several degrees to align the cotter pin hole. Once you get a feel for what 70-80 pounds feels like, you can do this in the future without the torque wrench.
You are right that the wrench needs to be matched to the job. If your required torque value falls somewhere in the middle third of the wrench's range you are good.
There is no "big deal". If you read back up the thread a bit, the discussion was that by using a wrench instead of a socket one could remove the wheel without removing the bags and mufflers. And again, on mine the mufflers are in the way. So that said I asked how one would torque it back on without then removing the muffles anyhow, unless you used a torque extender and calc'd the difference in torque.

So then someone (coulda been you, don't remember for sure) said to just torque the bolt on the left side instead.

So again looking at my bike you are still faced with the above ramifications on either side. There is no big deal, only a discussion that seems to change directions and loose track of the beginning. It don't make a flip to me, I'm not even the OP of the original question. I simply presented the insert of what good does it do to take the wheel off without a socket if you can't torque it back on.

Now if you don't use a torque wrench to tighten your axle that is your business. There are a lot of things I also don't use a torque wrench on, but my axle is not one of them. No big deal here.
 

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when there is a axle and a nut like on the rear wheel, the proper way is to hold the axle end on the left side with a socket while you turn the nut end on the right side, the improper way to do it would be to hold the right side nut with a wrench while trying to turn the left side axle, that is why you must remove the mufflers to properly get on a socket on the right side nut to turn it while HOLDING the left side axle
 

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when there is a axle and a nut like on the rear wheel, the proper way is to hold the axle end on the left side with a socket while you turn the nut end on the right side, the improper way to do it would be to hold the right side nut with a wrench while trying to turn the left side axle, that is why you must remove the mufflers to properly get on a socket on the right side nut to turn it while HOLDING the left side axle
Sure grease, whatever you say.:rolleyes:
 

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Well I'm at home now and got out my torque wrench and put the socket on it the size of the left side bolt head. The bolt head is a smaller size than the nut on the right side, but my torque wrench will not fit into the area with the muffler still on.

So this moves us back to the previous determination. Either take the bags and mufflers off OR use a wrench torque extender to torque it back on.

While a torque extender is an extremely useful addition to the tool box, not everyone has one in either the bolt or the nut size. But without removing the mufflers you will need one or else your torque wrench must have a smaller rachet head than mine (a Sears 0 thru 80 lbs). Actually the one I use on the axle is a larger Harbor Freight 50 thru 150 lbs, since I don't like to actually torque the highest setting of a T-wrench. Least ways not a clicker. I might do the max on a rail wrench.
There is no "big deal". If you read back up the thread a bit, the discussion was that by using a wrench instead of a socket one could remove the wheel without removing the bags and mufflers. And again, on mine the mufflers are in the way. So that said I asked how one would torque it back on without then removing the muffles anyhow, unless you used a torque extender and calc'd the difference in torque.

So then someone (coulda been you, don't remember for sure) said to just torque the bolt on the left side instead.

So again looking at my bike you are still faced with the above ramifications on either side. There is no big deal, only a discussion that seems to change directions and loose track of the beginning. It don't make a flip to me, I'm not even the OP of the original question. I simply presented the insert of what good does it do to take the wheel off without a socket if you can't torque it back on.

Now if you don't use a torque wrench to tighten your axle that is your business. There are a lot of things I also don't use a torque wrench on, but my axle is not one of them. No big deal here.
I'm sorry, but I'm having a real problem trying to figure out what you're saying here. It almost sounds like you have the proper sized torque wrench and socket for the nut side, but no access. On the other side, you have no socket to fit the axle, except maybe one that will only fit on your smaller torque wrench. Plus, YOU put a saddle bag in the way, and are now upset that I haven't figured out a way around that!
And now comes the holier-than-thou attitude that I don't I don't torque my axles while you do, or would, if only I could figure it out for you!
Is that pretty much it?:confused:
 

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Well my fellow forum members and friends I think we have this one covered to exhaustion. To recap my view on it before I go riding is that I errantly mentioned "mufflers" with an "s". In reality if I desired to get my torque wrench on the whichever end (without a torque extender wrench), I really only have to remove ONE muffler and that would be the one on the side I place the torque wrench. The other side could be held with a wrench, unless of course one does not trust a wrench and then one should use whatever they trust.
 

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I'm sorry, but I'm having a real problem trying to figure out what you're saying here. It almost sounds like you have the proper sized torque wrench and socket for the nut side, but no access. On the other side, you have no socket to fit the axle, except maybe one that will only fit on your smaller torque wrench. Plus, YOU put a saddle bag in the way, and are now upset that I haven't figured out a way around that!
And now comes the holier-than-thou attitude that I don't I don't torque my axles while you do, or would, if only I could figure it out for you!
Is that pretty much it?:confused:
Oops sorry pacomutt I was posted prior to seeing your post. Your second sentence is correct. The rest I don't understand unless you are referring to my saying mufflers with an "s" and I covered that in my just now post.

I don't understand you saying I have whatever attitude. I do not have an attitude. You asked what is the big deal. I told you there is no big deal. So that's all I have for you there. RWB (Dave)
 
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