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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I assume there's still some meat on the front tire, but about that rear tire, time to replace?

Front on top, rear on bottom.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Bicycle tire Tread

Artifact Bedrock Font Metal Sculpture
 

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2020 Kawasaki Vulcan S 650 Cafe ABS
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Replace both. Looks like they have some age on them as well with all the cracking.
 

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Hey man,I don't care What the co$t-Sometimes maintenance(as in New tires)Pay:unsure:(y):cool:s off:) Better to be Safe than sorry:)
 

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In my financially challenged days, I rode till at least on layer of cords were exposed. I was not a total idiot and rode with a bit of extra caution.
The tread provides traction. The carcas/cords provide structure and strength. You tire is a strong as ever... but with much reduced traction.
 

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Sorry that price was for 03 vulcan classic 1600
No matter what bike I am currently riding, I usually pay around $200.00+ maybe a little over for my tires off of e bay. I can not really complain as I have not encountered any bad tires from them yet. I usually don't buy the expensive tires because I try to ride in a conservative manner. (y) :geek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There's a lot to choose from. I had no issues with OEM tires even though they were 5-6 years old (the bike is from 2015).
People complain about them being bad, so I guess whatever I buy will be an upgrade :)
 

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Hi N84,
Your front tire is junk. The rear has a flat spot on the center line that should be noticeable when turning and uprighting from a turn.
  • You use your front tire for 70% to 100% of your braking traction. The dry cracking on your tires indicates that the tires sat for an extended period of time. That cracking can cause tread chunking and separation.
  • While cords may be used to supply the wall of the tire with shape and strength, they are easily and quickly chewed up by acceleration and braking.
  • If you enjoy being stranded miles from home waiting for someone else to deliver you from a preventable situation then by all means continue on these tires.
  • Don't take any passengers with you. Their lives should matter more than your own.
  • I know it was meant as a joke BUT...Seafoam will NOT restore your tires or add magical tread to them
 

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2012 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Nomad
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I assume there's still some meat on the front tire, but about that rear tire, time to replace?

Front on top, rear on bottom.

View attachment 253351
View attachment 253350
Even if these tires don’t blow out at high speed, if the front brake were to lock up (skid due to lack of traction) you will find yourself INSTANTLY laying on your right side, skidding down the road. Principle of gyroscopic action, for a fast turning tire. There is nothing the rider can do but hope your leg isn’t under the machine as it skids on it’s right side! Replace the tires before you ride one more mile!!!
 

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08 VN900C, 13 FLHX
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Tread aside, the manufacturing date would certainly place them in the EOL category.
Ari at Revzilla recently wrote an article on this. The real answer seems to be more about use and storage conditions than just age, and that five years past manufacture isn't necessarily time to replace them just because time's up. They have a whole tire section at Revzilla, so "you don't have to replace them every 5 years if they don't need it" is not exactly something he'd write just to sell more tires.


The ones in the pictures look pretty wrecked to me though, both wear and deterioration. I'd replace those as soon as possible.
 

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...The real answer seems to be more about use and storage conditions than just age...
Certainly one needs to use their own judgement in any scenario. The tires on my recently acquired '08 Nomad were original to the bike and though they looked new with low miles and were garage kept, the rubber was too stiff for use as ride quality/traction suffered too greatly. This, without any visual signs of fatigue/failure. For those who lack the knowledge/experience to determine on their own, with only two wheels on the pavement, better to follow the manufacturers recommendations and be safe rather than sorry IMO.
 

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08 VN900C, 13 FLHX
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Certainly one needs to use their own judgement in any scenario... For those who lack the knowledge/experience to determine on their own, with only two wheels on the pavement, better to follow the manufacturers recommendations and be safe rather than sorry IMO.
Which is probably the point of the five-year rule for tires and helmets. If you don't know how to tell, the five years is your catch-all. I've just been thinking lately about how maybe people who can tell whether a tire's still good have been replacing them when they don't need it, because the "when in doubt" failsafe became the rule.

Now I'm wondering how long my helmets will last if I just keep them in the refrigerator.
 

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Which is probably the point of the five-year rule for tires and helmets. If you don't know how to tell, the five years is your catch-all. I've just been thinking lately about how maybe people who can tell whether a tire's still good have been replacing them when they don't need it, because the "when in doubt" failsafe became the rule.

Now I'm wondering how long my helmets will last if I just keep them in the refrigerator.
Rubber can look "OK" and still be quite brittle. I really don't think anyone can really tell if an old tire is still safe. At least not without a laboratory equipped with the appropriate testing equipment. It may look OK, and even seem to flex OK, but not be in any condition to handle actual road stresses. Have you ever taken a rubber band that looked OK, and seemed to be flexible just snap when you stretched it just a little bit? That's because of breakdown at the molecular level that you just can't see.
 
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