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Discussion Starter #1
It is a mapping program which converts Google Map custom routes into Tom Tom Itinerary files.

It is free and I have been using it for a few months. I understand it previously was named Google-Tom Tom

Anyway, It has just stopped working on the import from website option. I thought maybe it was something with my computer but have now tried it on three computers, all previously working seamlessly.

Any ideas on what is going on or when a fix will be available?
 

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Google changes API and apps like that stop working.

iPhone + Google Maps + offline GPS app. Why use TomTom?
 

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In my experience, once loaded, Google maps will work fine without a cell signal (the app does change, but it's worked every time I've tried it). You need a cell signal in the beginning to load the route; but it'll still give you accurate turn-by-turn without a signal! You will eventually lose the map (so it'll be a blue line on a grey backgroud); but it'll still accurately tell you when the next turn is, etc. Obviously, it won't be able to recalculate.

An offline map app is a great choice, too!
 

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@Romans5.8 is correct.
Google Maps app get's all it's required information at the time when you request directions. The amount of information is very small, and will come through even feeble network connection. After that it does not use the cell network much. Google Maps is the most accurate mapping resource out-there. No one can compete with the might of the search giant when it comes to maps. Recently they have acquired Waze and now pour crowd-sourcing data in to their maps. Tom-Tom can't compete with that.

You might have heard that when Apple released Apple Maps everyone complained about how bad they were, and how poor the directions were. Guess what data Apple Maps is using. Right Tom-Tom data.

For rout planning there is a good app called inRoute available for iPhone. Route planned in it can be used in Google Maps, Apple Maps and many off-line mapping apps like Co Pilot or Garmin's Navigon app for iPhone.

In Android world, use MyMaps app. You can open your Google Maps routes in that. It will navigate you using Google Maps which is built in on an Android based phone, since Android is Google's baby OS.

Personally I find those stand alone GPS gadgets pointless and outdated.
 

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@Romans5.8 is correct.
Google Maps app get's all it's required information at the time when you request directions. The amount of information is very small, and will come through even feeble network connection. After that it does not use the cell network much. Google Maps is the most accurate mapping resource out-there. No one can compete with the might of the search giant when it comes to maps. Recently they have acquired Waze and now pour crowd-sourcing data in to their maps. Tom-Tom can't compete with that.

You might have heard that when Apple released Apple Maps everyone complained about how bad they were, and how poor the directions were. Guess what data Apple Maps is using. Right Tom-Tom data.

For rout planning there is a good app called inRoute available for iPhone. Route planned in it can be used in Google Maps, Apple Maps and many off-line mapping apps like Co Pilot or Garmin's Navigon app for iPhone.

In Android world, use MyMaps app. You can open your Google Maps routes in that. It will navigate you using Google Maps which is built in on an Android based phone, since Android is Google's baby OS.

Personally I find those stand alone GPS gadgets pointless and outdated.
Cool, I learned something, edumacated every day!!! I have a garmin in the company vehicle, thought about getting one for the bike, that is motorcycle specific, (waterproof, and find winding roads) Just rather use my phone
 

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and I agree outdated,.. if all else fails, I resort to my phone for google maps.. Just downloaded mymaps..
 

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They have their advantages. For one is battery life. They will last a lot longer than a smartphone assuming that smartphone isn't 'plugged in' to something. They are also waterproof (the motorcycle specific ones are) without the need for a special case and often have brighter screens. But are outdated, updated once a YEAR maybe (and you often have to PAY for the updates). And don't get me started on automotive GPS's. My wifes company has a few vehicles and one is a 2004 Cadillac CTS with a GPS unit. The last available, nearly $200 update DVD is from 2009. (2010 and up updates are not compatible with that system) So 5 years. 5 years they supported the GPS on a $50,000 car. It's entirely useless now because it's so outdated. More and more auto manufacturers are finally using connected car apps so that your smartphone does the work; since your smartphone will be updated much more rapidly. Using Google maps for mapping, etc. And even if that Caddy COULD be updated, GM wants $200+ a year to keep it updated. Google Maps updates constantly, in real time, for free. Most offline map apps out there for smartphones also update constantly, you just download the updates when you can.

They do have their advantages but they are far outweighed. In the bicycle world, most of us don't have access to a way to charge anything. GPS units are popular not always for directions (only a few bicycle GPS units do turn by turn directions) but for logging. If you ride for fitness like I do, then you kind of need to know how and whether or not you're improving! Getting home and looking at speed, cadence, heart rate, distance; and comparing it to the previous rides is great! Standalone GPS units are popular with riders who go on longer rides (think 5-6 hours +, 100, 200, 300 mile days. Powered by their own two legs. I know some motorcyclists who won't ride that far.) On a "double century" (200 miles) that could take 12 hours; the only way to do it is to have something that'll last; and that's a standalone GPS. And the folks who do those long endurance rides often aren't the ones who want to add weight and drag with a dynamo (generator) on their bicycle. That's more your 'urban commuter' accessory.

Myself, I just use a smartphone connected via bluetooth to a small screen attached to the handlebars. Smartphone goes in a saddlebag (which is a very small bag that hangs UNDER the saddle, on a bicycle). Lasts for the hour or two I ride every day just fine. Bluetooth heart rate monitor, cadence, and speed sensor (speed sensor on a wheel is more real-time than GPS speed); and GPS logging on the smartphone. Works great! The little 'screen' has a built in barometric altimiter which feeds back feet climbed too. There is no end to the data you can track these days. Pro cyclists (and deep pocketed enthusiasts) also generally track metrics like power output (in watts). The tech in bicycling has far surpassed motorcycling. Believe it or not. And in many ways; so has the cost. A high end road bike with a power meter could run you $20k.

Personally, I've found the best solution is to just listen for the turn by turn directions in either helmet speakers or fairing speakers, plug the phone into power somewhere, and go. No need, really, to see the screen. And charging the phone on the bike is a good idea anyway. ONCE I got caught out with a dead phone in a bad storm and while I know there's an old geezer somewhere saying "Back in my day", it was a pain. After that, I added on-board charging. Being able to check weather, call home, get a hotel, call for help, etc., is a nice bit of security.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I used google maps on my phone for a couple years with my bike. I liked many of the features. However, though custom maps can be built they are not reliable because of the auto recalculation feature. When I am riding I rarely take the route google would suggest. I'm looking for out of the way, curvey and personally selected roads.

With google you can create that route and even send it to your phone by text or email. The problem occurs if you go one block out of your way to buy gas or see something that catches your eye. When google maps recalculates your custom map is almost worthless.

By using Tyre I can save an actual TOM TOM Itinerary file which can be loaded on to my dedicated (old version) TOM TOM. I get reliable custom maps without paying a lot of money.
 

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Right. I was looking for exactly the same thing. Take me to the curves, use my own way points. So far the best thing I found is iPhone app called inRoute. Not intuitive interface at first but works and it does everything I want it to do. Takes me roads I wan to travel, not the google's fast choice. However I have to mind where I put the way points because it asks my permission to navigate to the next one.

Professionally I work with mapping providers, our web / mobile enterprise application is managing fleet of tracks. I know that Google changes their API (Application Programming Interface) often, and sometime they EOL (End Of Life) certain features of their stuff, sometime the change formats. The same is with developers of any software. While I have never seen the source code of "Tyre" I know that add-hock solution from Google Maps to GPX to third party device is not a reliable solution in a long term. Because the software, the communication protocols between software and data exchange format changes. Meaning if Google does a change, Tyre moves on and TomTom lags behind suddenly they can't "talk" thus. You have to ask Tyre support for help. TomTom support probably clueless about third party apps the make GPX files you can import in it. Google does not give a damn about a small company using their API. They give a fair warning that they are going to do a change, than they do a change. If the developers do not catch up, too bad.

I elect not to be caught in format and API wars, that is why an alternative solution on rapidly evolving and easily upgradable platform such as a smart-phone is preferable.

I would suggest contacting Tyre tech support, and dig around their forums for a possible answer. It very-well could be that they have moved on and TomTom did not.
 
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