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Discussion Starter #1
Beautiful weather here today so I decided to take the 900 out for a ride. Only complaints are:

1. Seat. I gotta get something more comfortable for those longer rides. The stock seat on my Vulcan Classic makes my old 4th point of contact sore after riding for awhile. Any recommendations? How is the Kawasaki gel seat for comfort?

2. Vibrations. Bike really vibrates when accelerating to around 60mph+. I checked the air in my tires yesterday, and they were 28 and 28 psi back and front according to what my owners manual recommends. I am a big fellow so Im thinking I should add more air to the rear tire. Also, would adusting the rear monoshock up a couple clicks or whatever to 6 or 7 work for smoothing out the ride?

Again thanks to all.
Dee
 

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I run the suggested tire presure recommended by the tire manufacturer ... its on the sidewall, kawasaki says lower settings on as it offers a more softer ride.
 

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+1 on the tire manufactures recommendation! (or at least a happy middle ground):)

28 psi may smooth out the ride but it will accelerate the tire wear significantly! I run 40 in the rear and 36 up front.

I have the Kawasaki gel seat and I don't really like it.
However; the passenger pad is quite a bit wider, and the wife loves it compared to the stock seat.

You should definately play around with the pre-set on the shock.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay got out the owners manual yesterday. 28 PSI for rear tire pressure for loads up to 215 lbs. 32 psi for loads 215 - 397 which is where I fall into. Put a little more air into the rear tire from 28 up to 32 psi. Went for a ride again this morning. Not too bad. One of the good soldiers I work with also recommended not "white knuckling" the grips while riding also. :) I have not checked the information on the side of the tire, will do that. This morning's ride was a nice one.
 

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I've run cycle tires for many yrs and have found out, just like the rest here that the tire needs to be held in shape under load. The tire will suffer cupping when soft and also be loose on the contact patch. With this in mind, the tire has on it a MAX tire pressure and load of 40 psi etc. We run 38/40 rear and 36/38 front. We get a decent tire life and a much better feel of road especially when cutting up the corners. It is dangerous to ride a wrinkle in a corner so boost the pressure up even more and keep it there !
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tomorrow then I will check the sidewall on the tires for max psi from the manufacturer, and inflate as needed. Thank you all for your help. I appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Checked my tire pressure earlier today before I struck out on my saturday afternoon ride. Max pressure was 41 psi, so I went 38 in the rear tire and 36 in the front. Ride was good. Real good. Very windy conditions this afternoon here. I think a storm is a blowin' in.

Dee
 

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if you are going to upgrade your seat, go with a Mustang.
Best aftermarket seat available for the Vulcan.

A little pricey but WELL worth every penny...

Mark
 

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I don't know where Kawi comes up with there tire pressure numbers , I once tried there specs 28 R/F and I wasn't out long before I came home and went back to 38R / 36F .

Kaw's spec's made for a vary mushy , borderline dangerous ride IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Another ride after work out to the dam and back. Had a learning experience which made me understand more the necessity for more time in parking lots or empty streets, practicing low speed riding. Got stuck in some bumper to bumper traffic. Stop and go. Nothing too bad, but enough to get my attention. At first I was struggling to keep the bike under control at the low speeds and stop and go. Struggled a little with the weight of the bike. I even contemplated pulling over and waiting for the traffic to thin out. Then I remembered what I learned from the RLAP videos on youtube about throttle, clutch, friction zone and rear brake. Plus i gave the car in front of me a bit more distance. It got better. Traffic probably didnt last over a half mile if that. Just enough to get my attention and really understand the need to be able to control the bike at low speed. Made it home safely.

Wore my new Joe Rocket Recon Military Spec jacket for the first time on the ride. I really like it. Very comfortable.

Going to a family reunion this weekend so wont get anymore time on the bike until next week sometime. Everyone have a great weekend and stay safe. God bless.
Dee
 

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The more you ride the more you encounter low speed situations , those skills come in handy more often than you might think . There also the ones many struggle with or just don't give enough attention to.
 

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The more you ride the more you encounter low speed situations , those skills come in handy more often than you might think . There also the ones many struggle with or just don't give enough attention to.
+1! Ya gots ta practice 'em! Nothing more embarrassing than being in a tight spot in a parking lot or intersection or something and being the goofball whose walking his motorcycle through a u-turn!

You should never ever have to take a step when you're in the saddle (except for backing out!) A proficient low-speed rider can handle any number of maneuvers without putting a foot down, or 'walking' the bike. Now, I'll admit I'm not always that guy! Odd hills doing a u-turn and such I end up walking it, but it's something I'm always practicing!

This has been posted before but if you can't do this, then you (and me both!) still could take some time every now and then practicing low speed maneuvers:

 

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Discussion Starter #15
XCR600, Romans 5.8 thanks for the advice and encouragement. I appreciate it. Romans 5.8 I like that video. The local police/sheriff's department here have the same bike as the officer is riding in that video. Ive seen them whip those big heavy Harley's around like that. Well at least in some u turns and stuff anyway. You all have a great weekend! God bless.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Does having the higher, wider handlebars on the bike like the ones in the video help more with the lower speed maneuverability of larger bikes like that? Mine are pretty wide, they're the stock ones that come on the classic.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
After taking the MSF course this weekend, and riding a much smaller, very used Honda Nighthawk 250 for the riding skills part of the course, I will never complain about my Vulcan vibrating again. That little bike really did vibrate and buzz. You could really feel it. Got me through the riding skills part of the course safely and successfully so I am not complaining!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Another nice relaxing ride earlier this morning. The fall temperatures are cooling down nicely in the morning. However this afternoon it is rather warm. I rode over to a Waffle House nearby for breakfast. After that, rode out to nearby Appling, then over to the lake and across the dam again. Came home a slightly different way than before. Came through beautiful Evans on Washington Rd. Before that I had to get out of the way from a speeding ambulance with sirens wailing away. Turned into a small parking lot as safely as I could to let the ambulance rush by. Feeling much more comfortable on the bike.
 
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