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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After a couple years of riding, we tend to get a little lackadaisical. Not completely careless, just more comfortable with the whole experience. You are told to always keep an eye on any traffic that could be a factor to your safety, and you still do, but after awhile that part becomes just quick glances. And you think you're doing everything right.

Wrong!!

Just a few minutes ago, coming back from the local convenience store on a rural paved road, I was turning right onto another "T" intersection paved road. I looked to the rear in the mirrors while slowing down for the turn, but it was just a quick "glance", not a real look see to determine the speed of that car back there. Next thing I hear is the loud and long sound of screeching tires locked up back there before I had even begun the turn. No time to look back & take evasive action, so I immediately knew I was toast. But I got lucky. He got on his brakes in the nick of time.

Let this be a lesson to us all. Just because we see traffic that could be a factor to our safety, do we observe that traffic long enough to determine its speed? We do when we're not completely comfortable as a new rider or the situation, but there are times when we don't, and should. The driver of that car back there never slowed down and if I had just held my rear view look a split second longer, I would have known that and moved over. You remember, the ole escape route we hear so much about.

Keep your head on a swivel, and when you do, keep it there long enough to assess what you're seeing.

Ride safe.

Edit: Another reason to perform basic safety checks on our bikes before every ride. I did after the incident and found turn signal and brake lights good, to my relief.
 

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Close one but you were not injured. I agree with your assessment and have caught myself doing the same. Slow down and observe what is going on around you.
 

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Rode with a guy for several years in a club here locally, solid rider on all levels in fact he was my mentor when I was a newbie to club rides (they assign you veteran riders initially). He moved to the Nashville area, was sitting at a stoplight and a female driver was texting behind him. She only hit the breaks when they made contact. Broke his neck on impact. Head on a swival even when sitting still, if it can happen to John it could happen to any rider. Cell phones are killing other four wheelers and bikers at an extremely higher rate than ever before.
 

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I am more mindful of the car following than ever before. In the past 12 months I have avoided being ran over just by increasing my following distance and having room to accelerate out of a bad situation because the following driver was distracted.
 

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This is one of the possibilities I'm most nervous about on my regular commute. Coming home at night I turn right onto the street perpendicular from my house from a quasi-residential street with a 45mph speed limit. Unfortunately everyone feels the need to treat it like a drag-racing track and I've had (what felt like) close calls from people that want to sit right on my tail as I turn onto a 25mph street. It's because of this kind of thing that I installed a flashing brake light, hopefully that helps people realize that I actually have to slow down a bit to make a single lane, 90 degree right turn!
 

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I am a bit paranoid about getting hit from behind. Too many people fiddling with their phones texting etc.. I ride a 900 custom and was not satisfied with the single brake light. I upgraded the bulb to one with higher wattage on the brake filiment. Upgraded to the signal minder and higher wattage bulbs. The signal minder will auto cancel the turn signals, but can also be set up to use the rear turn signals as brake lights (you need to change the lens to red by law). Now when the brakes are applied I have 3 lights on the back that flash a few times before going on steady. I make a habit of applying my brakes very lightly well in advance of a stop, hoping to get the attention of the driver behind me. I leave room in front of me whenever possible at a stop to allow for some options in case the driver behind can't stop in time. I leave the bike in first gear so I can move quickly if I have too.

Since I am just sitting on top of some metal and plastic and not surrounded by a 2 ton steel cage I figure I can't be too careful.
 

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I have an LED "Nightrider" strobe bar on the back under my license plate. On all three bikes. I repeatedly apply the brakes at a stop to make sure the rearward driver can see me. Yep, we are sitting ducks when at a stop and there is traffic ahead that is also stopped. Staying in gear is something I, too, do to pull to the side if possible, and I leave space ahead to do just that.

I have been rear ended FIVE TIMES while driving one of my cars, and I have permanent spinal injuries from those collective collisions. The last one was on a freeway, I was stopped as was all other traffic, I was in my G35 sedan and a guy in a Suburban slammed into me after maybe hitting his brakes a second or two prior to impact. $12,000.00 damage to the car but I drove it away. But the impact like the others injured my neck and lower back, both of which were already in bad shape from the first rear ender about 20 years ago.
 

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I found adding those little curved mirrors (don't know what they call them) on top of the mirrors very useful. They show the blind spots better. Of course nothing replaces careful riding, but it helps.

disclaimer:
I am just expressing my own experience and am in no way responsible for outcome of any nitwit getting in trouble with his or her mirrors or without his or her mirrors here and there and now and later. I know you all are highly intelligent people but none the less there are a lot of numbskulls around too and who knows some might ride and some might read and some might read this and some might do all three at the same time and bump into some other numbskulls and might get the silly idea to send their lawyers after yours truly after or before they have managed to shake their brain. I do believe a lonely single brain cell gets lonesome and might come up with silly notions sometimes or other. Hence this disclaimer.
 

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As a new rider, I've noticed people run uncomfortably close behind me on my motorcycle, even closer than they do when I'm in my Suburban. It's kinda scary.
I've had the opposite experience. I have people right on my bumper all the time, but most folks stay a decent distance behind me when I'm on the bike. Of course, there are the jerks that tailgate and cut everyone off without turn signals, etc.
 

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Hey Wild Bill, What higher wattage bulb did you use for your brake light? What is the number of the bulb? Thanks.
Tail/Brake light replacement Bulb 2357 is 25% brighter when the brake is applied compared to the standard 1157 bulb. They are the same output for the running light.

The penalty for the higher brake light output is the bulb life. I figure for a cost of $2-$3 every couple of years for the 25% increase in output is well worth the small cost. Especially when you consider the stock light set up is a single bulb for the running light and brake light.

1156 and 1157 Light Bulb Comparison - webBikeWorld

Automotive Brake Light Bulb Comparison | AUTOMOTIVE MILEPOSTS
 

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I made an aux. brake light(4X3 led side markers) fit it under my luggage rack, that and non stock pipes. But that is another thread. I feel that any thing you can do to improve vis is a good thing.
 

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I have an LED "Nightrider" strobe bar on the back under my license plate. On all three bikes.

How about seeing a picture of this light bar? I've been thinking of putting something else back there.
 

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I was rear-ended in my car once years ago and I'm a bit paranoid about those behind me. Luckily, hubby's bike has no speedometer, so he rides behind me and has more riding experience. Hope that will help me a bit.
 
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