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Discussion Starter #1
Just got through working with my shop addressing the belt noise. While in there, I was told that I didn't have any pressure in the rear shocks. They found this while test riding for the belt noise - it was bottoming out with one rider. They had me ride it and that noise was really strange and one that I had never heard. This went away with added pressure but it concerned me as I set the pressure to 30 PSI about 5-6 weeks back. As I talked with the guys at the shop, the temp change will have some affect on the small volume in the shock and even with the Progressive zero loss pump, there may be some amount of loss from disconnecting (although I'd think this would be minimal).

I will be keeping a close check but I have a question as you all have a lot more experience with the VV 1700 than I. How much change (loss) would a guy expect to see and over how much time...?

Any help is greatly appreciated!
 

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Air pressure

Hiya

I've had my Voyager new since May 2014, whilst I have put in more air when riding with a passenger I can say that when I put the pump on to either add or take out ( back to my 20psi solo riding) the air pressure never varies more than 2 or 3 psi from what I would expect to see.

Get the shop to check it out but sounds like leaky shocks, but both sounds unusual.

Russ
 

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The zero loss pump should not drop anything when disconnecting it. Mine doesn't. If you're losing pressure, get the shocks checked. Mine don't leak.
 

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Do you guys lift the bike off the ground like it calls for in the manual? Or just pump away with the bike on the ground. First time I have ever had a bike with air shocks.
 

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I don't think it matters.

Do you guys lift the bike off the ground like it calls for in the manual? Or just pump away with the bike on the ground. First time I have ever had a bike with air shocks.
I don't think it matters. What matters is finding the pressure that you are most comfortable with when riding and maneuvering the bike. Start at 20 psi and go up or down to find what you like best. If you ride two up, find out that number as well so you can just set-up and go when the mood hits. Just do your best to get the same pressure in both shocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I will be checking them this weekend again after setting to 40 this week. I have my fingers crossed that I don't see much change. Although the temp is going to drop, I wouldn't expect much drop.

Thank you all for chipping in! If anyone else has any thoughts, that would be great to hear.
 

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Don't go too high with the pressure... 40 is getting up there. If you hit a pothole you could rupture the seals and lose the air. Once your shocks don't hold air, they can't be repaired. Aftermarket is probably the best & most cost-effective option after that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Gotcha - thank you for the response!

That was set point for reference until I can connect the pump again.
 

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Still don't think that's a good idea.
Kawasaki Manual says to add air slowly, which is why the Progressive Air Pump that Kawasaki sells has such a small air chamber.

Probably be fine if it pumps slowly, but I wouldn't use it on mine unless I was sure.
 
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