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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have any experience with aftermarket fork seals they'd be willing to share?

I found myself in a bit of a rough patch when I noticed my stock pair leaking.

Apparently, is suggested to change the fork oil every couple years. I didn't know this and I've had the bike since '16. I'm not sure it was done by the original owner either, and she's a 2010.

Rusted spring seats. Rusted solid. Rust welded, in fact. After picking up a seal kit from "leak proof fork seals" (anything but leak proof), a buddy and I were unable to get the forks completely apart.

Fast forward three weeks and I've got every bushing, gasket, seat, and o-ring between the tubes and the lowers, plus two shiny new tubes. Do the job and ride it home. Next day, a short ride... And I've got wet forks again. Bring it back to my buddy's place and determine the oil seal may be upside down. Switch those over and we look golden. Two days later, I'm wet on the left fork again.

Needless to say, don't buy leak proof seals.

OEM looks like $73+ before shipping... So I'm wondering if there's another acceptable option that folks have had good experience with.

Whatcha got?
 

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No experience with a Vulcan yet, but I've gone with both All Balls seals (generic) and SKF Green seals on a few different bikes. SKF (specifically green) were by and large the best seal I've used yet, but the All Balls worked just fine too, they just had more stiction when new. To get the seals on without damaging them, I've used both Seal Bullets (from Motion Pro) and good old fashioned wax paper rolled around the tube. Slickoleum fork grease in the seal lip cavity and none of my bikes have developed leaks within their service interval time frames.
Looks like SKF green seals are the same price as OEM (worth it), and All Balls are half that if you're on a budget.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks like you're pretty close to the money. I looked for all balls first, but I thought I needed the metal ring as well. Seems I was wrong. I used that brand when I rebuilt my master cylinders and calipers.

Are you suggesting, in your experience, that SKF green seals are superior to OEM? If so, I might just spring for them instead.
 

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Superior in performance yes, the stiction is extremely low, and if serviced on time they will be trouble free. If you are the type to let it go until it's a problem or don't stay on top of keeping things clean, then their black seals will probably last longer. SKF black seals 'are' OEM for many manufacturers.
 

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I have a spare of All Balls Seals, people say good things about them...
anyways, 2 things:
1. keeping the forks clean prolongs greatly the seal's life. on my vulcan they are about 10yrs old, no leaks.. make a habit of cleaning/wiping them frequently
2. the new seals are supposed to be protected when mounted on the forks. as @rcb78 was saying, paper wax, wrapping foil, milk jar plastic, masking tape, anything that eliminates the real risk of the tube scarring the seal when mounting it...
Delboy knows what's what:

anyone interested in changing the fork oil, not all oils have the same viscosity. vulcans use
Showa Suspension Fluid SS8 (10wt), the viscosity is @40 Celsius: 36.47, 100C: 7.24. there are charts online for different oils, both mineral, semi and synthetics. heavier oils make forks slower (less rebound). in general oil gets thinner with time.
*for example, Lucas Oil Synthetic fork oil, Medium 10W is 42 / 7.6.. the best seller on amazon, Maxima 55901 10WT is a thinner oil (32 / 6.3)
 
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