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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Most of us, at one time or another, have had to listen to someone telling us how dangerous it is to ride a motorcycle. Anyone who feels obligated to provide us with this lecture clearly doesn't understand why we ride.
We have long since accepted our own level of risks and have come to terms with the fact that riding is intolerant of complacency or stupidity.

Many riders have taken a riding course of some sort or another either to learn how to ride or brush up on their basic skills. Now much more common than 15 years ago. As experience is gained on the street most of us will push ourselves toward the edge of our own comfort zone from time to time in an effort to improve the ride. On occasion I see riders get into a situation where more skill was needed than they possessed....and it never ends well.

So what is it that keeps you from pursuing additional training at a more advanced level?
 

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Most of us, at one time or another, have had to listen to someone telling us how dangerous it is to ride a motorcycle. Anyone who feels obligated to provide us with this lecture clearly doesn't understand why we ride.
We have long since accepted our own level of risks and have come to terms with the fact that riding is intolerant of complacency or stupidity.

Many riders have taken a riding course of some sort or another either to learn how to ride or brush up on their basic skills. Now much more common than 15 years ago. As experience is gained on the street most of us will push ourselves toward the edge of our own comfort zone from time to time in an effort to improve the ride. On occasion I see riders get into a situation where more skill was needed than they possessed....and it never ends well.

So what is it that keeps you from pursuing additional training at a more advanced level?
Nice post,,,be the first here to say it,,,laziness,can always find time to take a Improvement course
 

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I've done the BRC and the advanced riders course courtesy of the military, but everyone I know that rides or has recently start riding I highly recommend they enroll in both courses. To be as safe as possible while riding but also get the most out of your rides. Very helpful courses they've helped me out in several situations.
 

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I still have access to free training since I'm retired military, and try to do a course every year or two. I don't get to get to ride as much as I used to, so it's nice to have somebody watch and critique my technique so I don't get sloppy. Since January I've done the ARC for sportbikes and the dirt bike course.

Jennings GP is a few hours from here and my hope is to do one of their track rider novice courses in the spring before it gets too hot. I'd love to do a SMART or Rawhyde program, but those are just nowhere nearby, but damn they look fun and useful.

I'm trying to start my son off right by getting him into the MSF dirt bike course. We also have a dirt track in town that is talking about doing a kids' riding clinic. Doing both would be great. I can only show him so much, and he's seen me eat it a few times, so he may question my skill! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Nice post,,,be the first here to say it,,,laziness,can always find time to take a Improvement course
Solid point Rev, I think this may be often the case.

I've done the BRC and the advanced riders course courtesy of the military, but everyone I know that rides or has recently start riding I highly recommend they enroll in both courses. To be as safe as possible while riding but also get the most out of your rides. Very helpful courses they've helped me out in several situations.
I think those courses offer a great potential for natural progression of rider skills. Certainly put them to use myself.

I still have access to free training since I'm retired military, and try to do a course every year or two. I don't get to get to ride as much as I used to, so it's nice to have somebody watch and critique my technique so I don't get sloppy. Since January I've done the ARC for sportbikes and the dirt bike course.

Jennings GP is a few hours from here and my hope is to do one of their track rider novice courses in the spring before it gets too hot. I'd love to do a SMART or Rawhyde program, but those are just nowhere nearby, but damn they look fun and useful.

I'm trying to start my son off right by getting him into the MSF dirt bike course. We also have a dirt track in town that is talking about doing a kids' riding clinic. Doing both would be great. I can only show him so much, and he's seen me eat it a few times, so he may question my skill! :D
Jennings GP should be a blast, cooler weather would definitely help you enjoy it more. Aside from teaching the a variety of riding courses in my free time, I try to take a different one each year or so as a student to keep improving. You make a great point with someone observing, there is no replacement for receiving professional feedback. The ARC and DB courses are a blast; I started each of my boys off in the dirt as well. I am sure your son will be on the right track from the start.
 

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So far, for me, its been money. Almost $400 for a 2 day course is just more than I have to spend after purchasing the bike, reg., taxes, insurance, new tires, riding gear, yadda yadda yadda, I'm broke. Maybe next Spring. If it were free, or even reasonably priced, I would have already taken it.
 

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I took the BRC in the military years ago; a requirement to ride on base.

Took the Intermediate Rider Course with my wife a few years ago because she wanted a refresher and didn't want to go by herself.

Then last year I decided to take the Team Oregon Advanced Rider Class...one day, $150. Two hours of lecture and four hours on the track (pro circuit go-cart track...they train motor officers there as well).

Best thing I ever did...taking it again in September. I ride 12-15K miles a year and want every advantage to ride safe.

If you are an Oregon rider please consider taking one of their courses:
https://team-oregon.org/


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I took the BRC course in 2006. I would like to take an advanced/brush-up course, but nothing is available around here. I checked MSF.org, but nothing listed within 100 miles. I have checked with the local bike shops and they don't know of any. Your thoughts?
 

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Georgia used to subsidize the BRC and maybe one advanced course. $50 was all it cost the rider. That went away just before I started riding. :mad:
 

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If you are anywhere in the upper midwest, consider the Street Skills courses on the small track at Road America. $156 for the five hour course gets you almost 40 miles on the small one mile track. The track has multiple turns of every variety, enough grade changes to make hill stops/starts, a tight maneuvers area, high effort braking practice, swerve evasive maneuvers and more. A real steal for a on-track/non-track event for you and your road legal bike. We have another class day coming up the 1st Sunday of October. I have taught the Street Skills courses for the past four years and we get everything from 250cc street bikes, full dresser Glides, Triumph Bonneville, and even late 70's street bikes.
Go to Roadamerica.com and search "motorcycles."
 

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Understand your viewpoint. But it does help to refresh and sharpen the skills everyone once and a while. So some questions for you. Do you:
1. Regularly practice high effort braking? Can you consistently stop your bike in less than 150 feet from 60 mph?
2. Confident in cornering/leaning? Do you practice cornering control so you can actively chose the exact line through corners. Do you know what to do if you need to tighten your line a turn?
3. Slow speed maneuvers? Can you ride confidently at walking speed, feet up on the pegs/boards?
4. Ride at a "pace?" When you ride, backroads or twisties, can you maintain and steady riding smooth pace, a good flow? Riding with little upset of the chassis. Are you smooth?

I've been riding 45+ years and I still work on all my skills. In large part because I've been a cycle riding instructor for 25+ years and its proved I need to work at it to keep my skills on top.

I do have to say and a 25 year instructor, I and seen many Multi-year/1st-year riders; meaning the marginal skills that rider had, was repeated many years over with little improvement. The rider had simply been getting by. Just because a rider made it home from a ride doesn't mean the rider was any good at riding.
 
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