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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,

I have a habit of keeping my right boot resting on the brake (reduces reaction time). But a buddy told me that when he was riding behind me at the weekend that my tail-light was almost always on.

He reckoned it was a bit confusing as the light would come on, yet I was disappearing off up the road!

Can anyone tell me how I can adjust the brake lever so that it will take the weight of my boot resting on it without my tail-light being permanently on?
 

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I figure that if you're pushing the pedal enough to engage the light, you might be engaging the brake (however slightly) as well. I'd try riding without my foot on the brake.
 

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as simple as NOT riding the brake. it's not a good riding/driving practice. You trip the brake light with out hitting the brakes. the other riders drivers behind you don't know when you are actually hitting the brakes. it can cause a BIG problem. don't ride the brake, your reaction time only increases by less than .5 seconds really.

again, DONT RIDE THE BRAKE!
 

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I'm afraid i'm with the other guys on this, Irish.

Any adjustments to the brake mechanism to keep the light from coming on would make you have to press further to apply the brake when you need it. Adjusting just the switch for the light would mean you'd be dragging the brake all the time, which isn't good either.

I'd suggest that you not ride the rear brake at all and rely on your front brake for the first response when braking quickly. Your foot will cover the rear brake quick enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Fair enough guys.

I just thought there might be a sensor or something I could adjust so the light would only come on after a certain amount of pressure.

Looks like I'll have to de-train that particular habit!

Thanks for the advice.

Irish V
 

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its always good to minimize the reaction time, no doubt about that, but your front brake is the one you should be prepared to use in an emergency situation, not the rear one...
that being said, try to practice your braking every year! the habits you develop will be what you do in a emergency... good habits = good reaction ;]
so feel free to keep your foot relaxed

[ it takes about .8 sec for the weight of your bike to shift to the front, thus offering the best traction on your front tire. being ready to use your front brake is more important than keeping your foot on the rear pedal... in that initial ~1 sec apply gradually more force to your front brake, and afterwords use as much force as necessary to come to a stop w/o making the front tire lose traction. some say that 80% of the braking force comes from the front wheel/tire... ]
 
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