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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was thinking (in two minds) about starting a thread about using anti-corrosion products that would be 'strictly for the nerds/birds'. And well what the hell, here it is. (I thought about posting a reply in the currently active and relevant thread, 'Wintering the Vulcan S 650', but I didn't want to be a huge hog.)

The thing is, this is a topic that gets a lot of to and fro out there (as do most automotive-related topics) and there's plenty of 'expert' material to peruse, and I thought I'd share my findings (again from a purely theoretical standpoint) as somebody who is sure to be totally anal about maintaining their bike (I hope you guys Stateside sometimes use that word that way :oops:). The purpose and hope being that a just a few of you might appreciate it, as I'm guessing most of you won't - fair do's!

To some of you guys here, I could be wrong (and don't ever think I forget it!) but from what I've gathered using anti-corrosion sprays needn't cause such a sticky mess. For what it's worth, the following is what I'm planning to do so that I can rest assured that my baby's gonna stay as rust-free as a forever bike possibly can in all weathers. I'd be happy to offer my hows and whys upon request because I could write this whole thread on my own (bad for your health and mine). But I'd be equally happy to just let you guys steamroll over it any way you like (with plenty of good reason no doubt), so any/all thoughts are most welcome.

Note: If you're dead against using FS 365 for any reason then these steps don't apply :(
  1. Clean and dry the bike properly as normal. A bike can only be made as rust-proof as it is clean.
  2. Apply an even, thorough coating of XCP rust blocker all over the bike minus wheels and brakes (which should be carefully masked off) but including the electricals (seat removed), also making sure to get the spray deep into every hard-to-reach area. I'd probably want to do this using a bog-standard paint gun, or alternatively, using the aerosol together with the long-reach nozzle that comes with the XCP can. (The popular ACF-50 looks good but I reckon XCP would suit my purposes better... and yes, the film that these sprays lay on ARE sticky and XCP leaves a brown tint, but bear with me!)
  3. Wipe/buff down the 'top' layer of the bike - every surface that's clearly visible and can be cleaned by hand - and this will leave a clear film. (This should make step 5 easier.)
  4. Allow the XCP to settle/affix. Although these sprays don't dry to form a hard coating I'd probably want to wait a while before continuing with the next step to be safe, so I may just leave it overnight and return the next day.
  5. Using a cleaning brush, light detergent and water, clean away that buffed layer with a light scrub, then rinse and dry.
  6. Liberally apply FS 365 all over the bike (again with wheels covered) except avoid spraying onto the rubber controls and when done make sure to wipe any rubber surfaces with water or brake cleaner to make sure you won't leave any of it slippery (double check you haven't left any FS 365 on the tyres!) FS 365 shouldn't attack the XCP at all. Leave to dry overnight.
  7. Wipe over any surface marks and carefully apply more FS 365 to the forks and rims, by rubbing by hand or with a clean cloth, and let dry.
Now you have the benefits of using a leading spray without the aesthetics of a fly trap. Most of the dirt that does get stuck onto the inner surfaces can be washed off with a gentle hose spray. Or if you prefer to fully clean your bike more regularly it won't take long to repeat the steps above as part of the procedure. Of course, if you're not willing to use FS 365 regularly as per the manufacturer's instructions then all of the above is mute! But I can't see why you wouldn't because it makes shifting dirt much easier - a simple rinse of water and you're looking good.

I'd probably do this throughout the year at least quarterly in line with a schedule for a full clean, and rinsing the bike down on a weekly basis to keep it free from most of the dirt.

Of course nothing here is set in stone and I'll update the steps with any fixes/improvements as I see fit while I keenly consider any objections and suggestions here and stumble upon any fresh info elsewhere. Again, for the sake of any fellow 'perfectionists' :geek:
 

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I use CorrosionX HD in electrical plugs that are more directly exposed to moisture. The voltage regulator plugs on a VN2K are a good example.
 

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HighwayNine -

Thanks for posting this, I have been wondering about winterizing (see my post in the other thread). Your detailed description has given me a good idea of what is involved. - Randy :)
 
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I might see a need for coating the bike if it is stored in a costal area, or long term/indefinite storage period, or maybe if transported on an open trailer where it would be exposed to wintery/salty road spray.

For the typical few months, give or take, in relatively benign environment not seeing it. But, hey, like applies to just about any case, it's your bike to do as you see fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
HighwayNine -

Thanks for posting this, I have been wondering about winterizing (see my post in the other thread). Your detailed description has given me a good idea of what is involved. - Randy :)
Hey Randy,

I've been looking for that damned edit button the last couple of days (all I see at the moment is a link to the post :confused:??). I wanted to clarify that I had certain additional objectives in mind, and of course there are other ways of using these sprays that you might find to be easier or quicker and that still produce results. I don't think I'm selling the whole thing very well to be honest!

The way I look at it is that it can take as little as a half hour over a day or two (if that), and rather few applications over a riding season, to keep a bike corrosion-free. I really wish I had some actual usage of my own to share. All I can say is that I can't think of any other way to be totally sure that some rust won't creep in during cold storage. I hope you do find a satisfactory solution in any case, and if you'd ever like a second opinion from somebody who actually enjoys this stuff (oh sure!) then I'm always here. Good luck over those harsh Chicago winter months.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I might see a need for coating the bike if it is stored in a costal area, or long term/indefinite storage period, or maybe if transported on an open trailer where it would be exposed to wintery/salty road spray.

For the typical few months, give or take, in relatively benign environment not seeing it. But, hey, like applies to just about any case, it's your bike to do as you see fit.
I'd largely agree. The salted roads in the winter here in the UK were what prompted my paranoia.
 

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HighwayNine -

Thanks for your additional info. Being new with a full-sized real motorcycle I try to learn as much as I can from others' experience. For me, I don't see cleaning/maintenance as an end in itself but certainly a goal in keeping everything looking good. I know others get satisfaction out of doing as much maintenance etc. as possible so I am trying to weigh or balance the time involved with the need, if that makes sense. Thanks for your reply! - Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm glad I could help a bit. Sure it makes perfect sense.

Actually, my goal is to spend as little time as possible in the garage. That's one of the reasons I got to thinking about combining the spray with a product like FS 365. That way, you can keep your bike looking ace and still be totally rust-proof AND spend less time actually cleaning it... Hopefully I'll find a way to edit my original post soon...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I didn't want to 'bump' this thread on my own but I've now learned that posts can't be edited after 24 hours, and I just wanted to clarify a few things that might help future viewers. I now can't change what I wanted to without doubling the word count - apologies and I promise not to make a habit of it - but the following covers the main points I wanted to add.

My personal objective is (1) to achieve maximal corrosion protection while (2) constantly keeping the bike as clean as possible and (3) spending as little time as possible in doing so over the riding season. Those are in order so that (1) comes first and can't be compromised, and (2) can't be compromised by (3). Fun, huh?

The main purpose of using Scottoiler's FS 365 (or similar if any exists) is to keep dirt loose and easily rinseable while still providing the same level of corrosion protection as any spray. Using this product together with XCP is the best method I've come up with to meet my goals. There are other methods and products that can produce nice results, so again feel free to discuss any of those here if you wish. My own 'problem' with these is that either aesthetics will suffer due to stickiness, or keeping the bike as protected and clean as I'd like would require more full cleans (and this takes much longer than re-applying and rinsing FS 365, which is super quick).

I'd also like to clarify further on the time/effort needed for all this. Using sprays may require that you leave your bike overnight before heading out again, and the addition of FS 365 could add more drying time to that still, but that doesn't mean your bike has to stay out of action if you ride daily. Just follow the drill up to step #4 before you put your bike away for the day and continue with the remaining steps after the following day's ride. As for the effort, it's actually less than a half-hour job on top of the cleaning, plus you can get away with far fewer cleans over the year. If you want to rust-proof your bike AND keep it clean, I actually can't think of a quicker method, period. That's really why I wanted to share this 'guide' here. If anybody's found a more efficient method then I'd be very keen and grateful to hear about it.

The last important point for me, being anal and all, is that I'm looking at all of this in terms of keeping a bike as corrosion-free as possible over a period of more than a decade. Even if I end up selling a new bike a few years after purchase, I'd still want to look after it like it's a true keeper. It's each to their own, but time is metal's greatest enemy and I'm not convinced that a 'typical' maintenance regime won't result in noticeably more corrosion over that sort of time frame. I'd also think it's fair to say that if you're riding where there's salt in the air or on the roads then using products like these is a must for keeping corrosion at bay even in the very short term.

Too many words for a newb's 2 cents, I know, but I hope this helps somebody.
 
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Thanks for that HighwayNine. What a drag that you can't edit your own posting after 24 hours . . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sure is, cheers Randy.
 
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