Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey ya'll! I know it's been a minute since I last posted here but things have been going pretty smooth with 'Ol Bessie ('95 Vulcan 88) so no complaints at the moment. I am, however, looking for something of an upgrade. A person near me has a '99 Vulcan Classic 1500 with 20,000 miles on it for sale at a decent price. I was wondering if any of you owners of said year/model can fill me in on any common problems to look for if I do indeed get that bike. Did they use the plastic oil pump gear on these models? Any other things I should be aware of?

Thanks for your time and input.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,199 Posts
Yes, they did use the plastic gear, otherwise about the same as all the rest. You do gain a better transmission which is 5 spd.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,199 Posts
Ugh, not what I wanted to hear but thanks for sure! Were they still carbureted in '99?
Only 1500, in '99 that was not carbureted was the Drifter. Regardless of how good a deal it is, I would recommend staying away from a '99 model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Right on. Is there any particular year or years that seem solid with the 5 speed transmission? Definitely looking to stay around the 1500 or bigger engine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
671 Posts
Right on. Is there any particular year or years that seem solid with the 5 speed transmission? Definitely looking to stay around the 1500 or bigger engine.
Any of the E models after 2000 will have a steel oil gear and a 5 speed transmission if I recall correctly. Also, keep in mind a 20-year-old bike with a thousand miles a year average on it means more likely most of those 20k miles were put on it the first few years and then not a whole lot for the next 15. Depending on how and where it was stored, there may well be a whole pile of rubber bits in the carb, intake and so on that are just dying of old age. It gets stiff and cracks. especially the rubber that is soaked in fuel all the time and then allowed to dry out for some time. Too bad you don't live near me, health is forcing me to seriously consider selling mine. It has a lot more miles (46k) but it runs like a champ. I have a friend 30 miles away who rides a 2008 Nomad all year round if he can (we often get two feet of snow) and had his top-end done at 130,000 miles. I think he said he replaced his fuel pump at 78,000 miles. These are great bikes. I'm the only owner and don't want to let it go, I made some great memories on that old boy, it's the last thing I have held onto since my joints started all going to hell. I'll make someone a heck a deal just to see it go to someone who will ride it more than I can these days. I might just get a little older KZ750 or something for running errands, but I don't know that I'll ever tour again. Sucks to get old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for reminding me about the fuel/rubber situation. I've replaced the cracked rubber air control valves on my bike a couple years ago and almost forgot all about it. Damn ethanol.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top