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Discussion Starter #1
After taking a few years off from owning a bike, I recently purchased a 900. I've been going through this forum over the past few weeks, reading page by page of Vulcan 900 posts. What's really interesting to me is that everyone talks about how much they love their 900, how it's such a nice size (physically), and how they've customized it to suit their tastes or riding style. Then I look at the poster's signature and see "20xx Vulcan 900 (sold)". So what's the deal? Is the 9 considered a starter bike, which everyone eventually sells to upgrade?

As you can see in my signature, I too first owned a brand new 900, which I sold after 2 years. After that, I didn't own a bike for about 5 years. I then purchased a low-mileage 1600 Nomad from a co-worker. I figured since I loved the 900 so much, "bigger is better" and I would really love the power of the 1600. I only kept the Nomad for about a year before selling it. The power was ok (not as big of a difference as I expected), but it just never felt as fun or as nimble as the 9 did. Again I took about a 5 year break from owning a bike, until I purchased another 900.

My current 900 is everything I remember about my original. I've painstakingly located all of the customized parts that I had on my first 9, even down to crash bars and highway pegs from a company that is now out of business. The upside is that I paid so little for this 10 year old 900, that I figure if I ever feel the need to take a break from riding, I can just park it for a while. But with the smile it puts on my face, I don't see that happening. I have a whole new appreciation for this bike.

So to those of you that had a 900 and have sold it for a different ride, do you have any regrets? Or is your bigger, better bike the improvement you were hoping for.
 

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I'm one of those that had and sold a 900 in favor of a larger bike, a Nomad. My reason is this: I became fond of long distance riding and took several trips with my 900 ranging from 1,000 to 4,000 miles. I live in central Texas and took multiple trips into north Arkansas, to the Grand Canyon, Tail of the Dragon and more. The 900 handled the long trips great but it's not a long, long distance touring bike IMO. While it's an awesome bike for shorter trips, handles great and is nimble, as you said, it's comfort is lacking for all-day runs, day after day. With my Nomad I can ride all day and look forward to the next day of riding. This wasn't the case with the 900. Since getting the Nomad I've ridden to Maine, Yellowstone, toured all of Colorado, and up to Minnesota. Next year I'm headed to California, Oregon and Washington. I wouldn't have enjoyed those on the 900.

Around here I would prefer the 900. On the many mountain passes I've been on I would have preferred the 900. It's so nimble and quick that I found it preferable to the Nomad. But, getting to those mountain passes was the issue for me.
 

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I've been riding since 1983. My first brand new bike (also 1st V twin) was a 2007 900 Custom. I road it until 2017 and loved every minute of it. It was great at zipping around town and I'm one of the few that had no problem riding it all day at 70+ mph. At the age of 63 I decided I didn't want to be riding a 10 yr old bike. Also, I fell in love with the mid 80s Gold Wings decades ago. I figured this was my last chance to own dressed heavy cruiser and I bought a 2017 Vaquero 1700. I do not regret that decision and I have not been disappointed in the Vaq. However I wish I could have kept the 900. I did the next best thing; I sold it to my son. 46,000 miles and still runs like champ!
 

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I had my 900 for 5 years. I was riding with guys on Ultra Classics and Gold Wings. On the interstates I just felt like it was all my little bike could do to keep up with them, so I traded it in on a Voyager. It has plenty of power, huge amounts of storage, and is really stable on the road. I can cruise at 90 for hours if I want to and it just purrs along. The drawback is it's a very large and heavy bike. It does not handle the curvy mountain roads as easily as the 900, and living in East TN, there are plenty of those. Now that I'm no longer riding with those other bikes I sometimes regret trading the 900, but I feel safer having my grandkids on the back of the Voyager since it has the tour pack, hard bags and rear crash bars.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
So it's about the type of riding. Long distance highway riding seems to require a larger cc bike, where as the 900 is better for cruising, hilly/winding roads, etc.

I went on a 6 day, 2300 mile trip to Tail of the Dragon / Blue Ridge Parkway / Cherohala Skyway back when I had my first 900, and thought I was perfectly comfortable for that entire ride. Thinking back now, I suppose it would have been much easier with the Nomad.

So what I can take from this is, if I ever feel the need to upgrade my bike again I shouldn't consider getting rid of the 900, just add one to the garage. (y)
 

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After taking a few years off from owning a bike, I recently purchased a 900. I've been going through this forum over the past few weeks, reading page by page of Vulcan 900 posts. What's really interesting to me is that everyone talks about how much they love their 900, how it's such a nice size (physically), and how they've customized it to suit their tastes or riding style. Then I look at the poster's signature and see "20xx Vulcan 900 (sold)". So what's the deal? Is the 9 considered a starter bike, which everyone eventually sells to upgrade?

As you can see in my signature, I too first owned a brand new 900, which I sold after 2 years. After that, I didn't own a bike for about 5 years. I then purchased a low-mileage 1600 Nomad from a co-worker. I figured since I loved the 900 so much, "bigger is better" and I would really love the power of the 1600. I only kept the Nomad for about a year before selling it. The power was ok (not as big of a difference as I expected), but it just never felt as fun or as nimble as the 9 did. Again I took about a 5 year break from owning a bike, until I purchased another 900.

My current 900 is everything I remember about my original. I've painstakingly located all of the customized parts that I had on my first 9, even down to crash bars and highway pegs from a company that is now out of business. The upside is that I paid so little for this 10 year old 900, that I figure if I ever feel the need to take a break from riding, I can just park it for a while. But with the smile it puts on my face, I don't see that happening. I have a whole new appreciation for this bike.

So to those of you that had a 900 and have sold it for a different ride, do you have any regrets? Or is your bigger, better bike the improvement you were hoping for.
Hello, my friend.
Though I've never thought about selling my 900, let alone "sell then regret"...I had to post.
I hope you don't mind..

The bike one owns and initially rides...will always be an opponent to the "upgrade". That is human nature.
But the owner of the first bike is in control of the "upgrade" taking over.
The initial bike's triumph will depend on 1) Contentment of the owners initial bike, and 2) the size of the owners wallet.

For what I do with my bike, the 900 is all that is needed for maximum smileage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good points Buskman. As it's been over a month since my purchase of my 2nd 900, I can see where some might feel the need to upgrade. However, this time around I realize that, for me, the trade off between the higher RPMs at hwy speeds and overall fun (maneuverability) of the 900 is worth keeping it.

(I do have the Barons front pulley, and am considering adding the rear to further decrease RPMs.)
 
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