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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

According to the owner's manual, the tire pressures for the custom are 40 psi in the front and 28 or 32 in the rear depending on the load. This doesn't make sense so I looked up the Dunlop recommendations and they are 32 in the front and 38 in the rear. I then called Dunlop and they confirmed their website and stood behind their recommendations. I thought I would pass this on for those who may have an interest. I don't have a phone number for Kawasaki and am thinking that they don't publish one.
 

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Hello,

According to the owner's manual, the tire pressures for the custom are 40 psi in the front and 28 or 32 in the rear depending on the load. This doesn't make sense so I looked up the Dunlop recommendations and they are 32 in the front and 38 in the rear. I then called Dunlop and they confirmed their website and stood behind their recommendations. I thought I would pass this on for those who may have an interest. I don't have a phone number for Kawasaki and am thinking that they don't publish one.
32 in the front sounds awful low to me. That's a pretty skinny tire, which usually means more PSI.
 

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i run nitrogen, 40 psi front and 40 psi rear.....tires still both look brand new
 

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I tend to believe what is printed on the tire, the manufacturer would know the best pressure for their product. Not all tires or tire makers would be the same.
The pressure stamped on the tires are the max pressure for the designed max tire load, it is not the absolute tire pressure required. Car tire manufacturers usually say "refer to the car manufactures owners manual" for recommended pressures. This is because each vehicle has different intended purposes and loads on tires. The load on the tire is the biggest factor to determine tire pressure. Front and rear tires don't split the weight of a car (or bikes) 50/50, that's why you could have different pressures recommended on the front and rear tires of some cars. Part of the pressure issue is personal preference, do you want a harder ride and longer tread wear or someone else may say I want a nice ride, I don't care if the tire doesn't last as long (rich guys). Weather conditions and handling may dictate different tire pressure. My point ther is no absolute "one" right or wrong tire pressure. The Kawasaki manual is probably using the pressure stated for a one up, 170lb guy with no extra weight and for a decent ride. If your loading up with gear and two up riding, I'd definetly go with the max tire pressure stamped on the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hello,

I called Kawasaki yesterday and they said that they stick by their manual and that it is correct. When asked to explain the logic, the response was esssentialy " we get the info from Japan". My thoughts on not wanting a high pressure on the small front tire is that the high pressure will provide a smaller contact patch and it is small already by virtue of it's size. When researchiing which bike to buy, I recall several comments from reviewers indicating that the classic would probably have a little more traction because of it's larger cross section. As with all things there are trade offs.
 
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