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Enjoyed it. Thanks. I always catch flak from fellow riders for the music in my helmet. I get the fact that I can’t hear the oncoming car about to side swipe me. However, I’m way too analytical... if I don’t have music, I’m constantly looking at the speedometer and gauges rather than looking where I’m going. For some reason with music, I’m able to mellow out and focus on the road ahead of me rather than what speed I’m going or which gear I’m in. So I think I’m safer with it, but I fully acknowledge it’s my own personality short comings rather than an actual safety aid :). If your high strung like me and need music to enjoy the ride and stay focused on the road ahead, I say go for it! :)


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Brainstorm...

1. ATGATT
2. don’t brake hard while in a turn / lean - explaining the physics of this to a rider is always fun.
3. many accidents happen at slow speed, ie I know a ton of bikers rear ended while stopped. See 5a.
4. Look into the turn
5. always leave plenty of space in front and behind... behind being the important one as you can stop quicker than the car behind you
5a. Watch your mirrors!
6. always assume cars are going to jump out in front of you and have a plan for when they do. They will. They don’t see bikes.
7. relax
8. have fun, but not too much fun ;-)

Most of those are pretty common.

P.s. learn how to kick cars when they pull into you. I bought a bike a few years back and my wife was following me home in the car. She watched someone in the inside turn lane swing into the outside turn lane mid turn and try to kill me... I’ve never heard the end of that one :)
 

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I agree with your tips, especially riding while under duress. Not a good choice, take the car. For reasons you mentioned.
I do however ride with music in my helmet and can hear plenty of road traffic with it on. I like music and find it’s a part of relaxing for me and takes away the monotony that is driving sometimes. It can “get your motor running” but so does a nice, long, clear stretch of road. The point is, use common sense. The engine drone, vibrations and wind puts me in a coma, after awhile. I like the music better. Keeps me more focused.
I should add that if you don’t normally listen to music, don’t like it or don’t listen to it in your car, then there’s no reason to do so on a motorcycle. It’s just personal preferences. Somepeople may like talk radio, the farmers report, etc. Same idea. Or, you may like the natural road noise. It’s your call on this one.
 

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I definitely agree with the 6 & 7.

I almost always listen to music when I ride. Like VulcanHead said, you can still hear plenty of road noise and I don't think it distracts you when riding. TBH, I would think recording a vlog while riding is more distracting? No?

As for eating before you ride.....meh. I often go on rides with friends for the sole purpose of finding some place new to eat. Ride & Dine.

If I chugged a bottle of water before I rode everytime, I'd be stopping on the side of the road a couple times to piss......when I get thirsty, I stop and grab a drink.

And while I don't disagree about riding while you're emotional, I'd say going for a ride when you're really happy is great! Makes a great day better, and when something has you upset, a nice long ride often clears your head.....but like I said, I don't disagree with the premise.

Good video, I wish I was in 71F Texas right now and able to ride!!
 

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5. always leave plenty of space in front and behind... behind being the important one as you can stop quicker than the car behind you
Be careful there - the Vulcan S has a 60-0 stopping distance comparable to that of a mid-sized sedan. It actually doesn't even make the top 100 best stopping cars list (the worst in that list can do it in 100 feet, the Vulcan S takes 118).
 

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Be careful there - the Vulcan S has a 60-0 stopping distance comparable to that of a mid-sized sedan. It actually doesn't even make the top 100 best stopping cars list (the worst in that list can do it in 100 feet, the Vulcan S takes 118).
A lot of people on motorcycles don’t realize that they are highly unlikely to outbrake a car in an emergency stop, especially on the highway.
A minivan can outbrake the KVS.
 

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Here’s some comparable braking:

Motorcycle 60 to 0:
2015 Kawasaki H2 - 124 ft
2015 Aprilia Tuono - 115 ft
2016 Victory Gunner - 146 ft
2016 Harley Sportster - 139 ft
2016 Yamaha Bolt - 152 ft
2015 Honda CBR300 ABS -134 ft
2016 BMR R1200R -119 ft
2016 Yamaha FJ09 -133 ft
2016 Kawasaki 1000 Versys -129 ft
 

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You know the yellow lights where you have to make a quick decision on whether or not to stop or gun it? After I make that fast decision to stop rather than risk running a red, as I begin to make the transition to stopping quick, I ALWAYS check my mirrors! If there's a car even remotely near behind me, I instantly change my decision and gun it, which usually gets me through the light while still yellow because I've already dropped a gear from starting to slow down. I'd take running a red light EVERY time than risk some yahoo in a lifted pickup plowing through me.
 

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Brainstorm...
2. don’t brake hard while in a turn / lean - explaining the physics of this to a rider is always fun.
I think this one is not so strait forward. Clearly hammering on the binders mid corner on a questionable surface is a recipe for pizzas but racers brake very hard entering corners ('entering' being the key word - but they are leaned over while braking heavily) all the time - it's called 'trail braking' and is a good skill to learn (tricky to learn how to do it properly though).
 

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I largely follow those seven tips.

When I am tired or in a down emotional state I know better than to ride because it won't be any fun. But more generally, I have a particular mindset every minute on a bike: be in the moment, use all my senses and intuition, expect the worst and prepare a way out of it. Focus.

That's really one of the great things about riding for me: setting everything else aside and "be here now..." :cool:
 
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