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Has anyone gotten over 50,000 miles on the original factory stator?
 

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I have just about 28K on my 09 Classic LT and would love to see 50K from my stater, I avg about 10-11K a yr so I hope I make it thru this season. I thought about adding extra lights to the bike but I don't think I wanna put anymore stress on my stater, regulator, Or me worrying if its gonna go out or not.
 

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There was a fairly detailed thread a while back itemizing the things that people who had longer lasting stators were doing.

1- NO accessories. Kawasaki may say that the Stator can handle 70 watts over, but the fact is the people that got more life out of it had basically nothing over stock, no light bars, no espresso makers, etc.

2- Di-electric grease on connections. It's been theorized that the stator ends up working overtime due to moisture and corrosion on certain connections, such as the battery, and especially the regulator. Take the plugs out of the regulator, spray in some di-electric grease, and use the same stuff on the battery terminals. Keeps the juices flowing so the stator doesn't have to work harder to make up the difference.

3- Replacing the battery. Most people replace a battery when it fails, but with these notoriously weak stators, special attention is needed. If you jump your bike and let the stator charge it up, that's a serious and damaging drain. If at all possible, avoid that. On a lesser, but still prominent note, batteries that are a couple years old will lose more charge when it sits and cause the stator to work harder, plus just generally cause more draw as it ages. If you replace your battery every couple of years then you will probably contribute to stator health.

So to recap- grease the connections, replace the battery frequently, no accessories, and you probably could get 50k out of it. (That's just my theory anyway, formulated from what I've been reading in the time I've been active in these forums)
 

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"and it 'only has a pos and neg that runs directly to the battery?"

If you run it directly to the battery you'll be draining the battery when you're parked. You connect the positive to a switched power lead like running lights. That way when you pull the key the gauge shuts off too.
 

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and it only has a pos and neg that runs directly to the battery?
Not to the battery, The diode wires connected to turn signal bulb wires inside the speedo, the diode wires are only about 6 inches long, you take your speedo off and cut the gray and green wires going to the turn signal bulb and then solder in the diode wires, the diode prevents both LED left and right turn signals from flashing at the same time, which they will both do if you install LED turn signals without the diode kit. I can give a more detailed description of how-to-do once you decide to install LED turn signals.
 

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Hey thanks for the heads up Degreaser! Thats not a bad price for knowing what your charging systems doing. I assume that you must have one, and it only has a pos and neg that runs directly to the battery?
Oops, sorry for my previous posting about diode kit, I was thinking diode kit for turn signals when I should have been thinking battery gauge, the battery gauge wires do not run to the battery, you solder in the battery gauge wires inside the speedo to the dash bulb, you take off your speedo and drill a small hole on the speedo dash for the 2 gauge wires, solder the wires to the bulb wires and stick the gauge over the drilled hole hiding it and the wires, the gauge has a sticky tape backing.
 

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3- Replacing the battery. Most people replace a battery when it fails said:
IMHO replacing a battery every couple of years is not called for if you would use a Battery Tender religiously. When my bike is turned off for one hour or for one year, it always is hooked to the Battery Tender. Bike is now entering it's fourth year and the battery is just like new. This may not work for everyone but a Battery Tender does increase the life of a battery.

Brian
 

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I thought about adding extra lights to the bike but I don't think I wanna put anymore stress on my stater
All LED lights is the way to go, low amp draw, cept for the headlamp, mine is halogen 55/60w bulb, I tried going LED Truck-Lite for the center headlight but can't find a way to install the Truck-Lite lamp in my the housing, but the turn signals front and rear plus brake light and running lights and driving bar lights are all LED now. I have MR16's for driving lights up front.
 

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I replaced the 6 year old stock battery with an heavy-duty Shoria (LFX18A1-BS12). When I started the bike this morning (the first night the battery was in place after 40 miles of riding the night before), the fuel pump sounded way loud compared to what I was used to. Next, after the bike fired (a little different from most batteries; bump the starter, then wait 10 seconds, then start; it seems to help the battery work better), there was no high idle. Odd, I thought, in 35 degree F weather after a overnight low of 25 F. Let the bike idle for 15 second, shut it down, fired it back up 30 minutes later. Again, no high idle. I thought I had noticed this last night when I first fired up the bike; it ran high idle, went to a higher idle, then down to the regular idle all within about 10 seconds. Stayed at low idle even after 5 starts during the 40 miles. Took it for a short, 3 mile ride after the two cold starts above; shut her down, restarted warm, and she wanted to go to high idle but didn't. Hmmmm.

My theory is, a start is hard on a battery; if the battery is starting to go, the idle stays high, even if the bike is warm or it is warm outside, to help ensure adequate charging of the battery and the running of the electrical systems. If that is the case, then that can be very hard on the stator/regulator and shorten life span. Just a hunch, I'll see what happens during the year.
 

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I replaced the 6 year old stock battery with an heavy-duty Shoria (LFX18A1-BS12). When I started the bike this morning (the first night the battery was in place after 40 miles of riding the night before), the fuel pump sounded way loud compared to what I was used to. Next, after the bike fired (a little different from most batteries; bump the starter, then wait 10 seconds, then start; it seems to help the battery work better), there was no high idle. Odd, I thought, in 35 degree F weather after a overnight low of 25 F. Let the bike idle for 15 second, shut it down, fired it back up 30 minutes later. Again, no high idle. I thought I had noticed this last night when I first fired up the bike; it ran high idle, went to a higher idle, then down to the regular idle all within about 10 seconds. Stayed at low idle even after 5 starts during the 40 miles. Took it for a short, 3 mile ride after the two cold starts above; shut her down, restarted warm, and she wanted to go to high idle but didn't. Hmmmm.

My theory is, a start is hard on a battery; if the battery is starting to go, the idle stays high, even if the bike is warm or it is warm outside, to help ensure adequate charging of the battery and the running of the electrical systems. If that is the case, then that can be very hard on the stator/regulator and shorten life span. Just a hunch, I'll see what happens during the year.
You may be on to something here, I have always wondered about the battery being so weak. And why there are so many levels of fast idle.
Did some research on that battery and I am impressed with the specs, and the reviews are glowing so far.

I have a lot of questions so if you would start a new thread it might be valuable to all the forum members. Don't want to hijack a thread.

You started it now give with the info.:D
 

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You may have something there. On a car, part of the EFI system is a voltage input so that the idle is sufficient to keep the charging system running (that's why your idle kicks up when you hit the A/C). If our bikes have the same setup, then it would make sense.
 

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This needs to be a new Thread

I would think, any EFI system would have to have a voltage sensor that would be available to the ECU. The experience i have in computer programing also tells me the story of how this happens, the programmer is given a spec of over 13 volts for high idle and then the been counters and engineers change the battery strength, because the software will compensate.
From playing with the idle I know the high Idle is set during POST, start up testing, there are three different steps from 1% to 3% throttle set, if you gently hold the throttle at key on you can feel the movement. With the relative weakens of the stock battery and the limited life that most people report, this could be the solution to many mysteries. My battery is looking poor now, and I was looking at replacing it soon. I have a battery tender but do not use it unless I expect to not ride for a while.
 

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12/11 Info update from the Stator replacement thread

Approx 46 posts on topic, over 4,000 looks at thread.

19 people posting they lost their stators. 14 replaced it once, 1 poster*, replaced his three times (139,000 miles on bike)

Replacements were at 6,500, 7,000, 8,000, 9,000, 10,000, 12,000, 13,000 17.500 20,000, 20,000, 22,000, 26,500, 29,000*, 30,000, 33,000, 35,000, 49,500, 50,000, 79,000*, 112,000*.

Water in regulator plug mentioned by a few. Rear Lic blub needed to be replaced all three times was mentioned by high mileage leader * (his mc is his daily driver = all weather).

Additional accessories added to electrical system indicated by 2 of the 19. As such, this would not seem to be a contributing factor.

13 of the bikes are 06/07. 08 4 times, 09 once.

As some have mentioned weather/water, (which is the most mentioned possible cause) please include an answer to that in your posts as a no, possible, or yes
 

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There was a fairly detailed thread a while back itemizing the things that people who had longer lasting stators were doing.

1- NO accessories. Kawasaki may say that the Stator can handle 70 watts over, but the fact is the people that got more life out of it had basically nothing over stock, no light bars, no espresso makers, etc.

2- Di-electric grease on connections. It's been theorized that the stator ends up working overtime due to moisture and corrosion on certain connections, such as the battery, and especially the regulator. Take the plugs out of the regulator, spray in some di-electric grease, and use the same stuff on the battery terminals. Keeps the juices flowing so the stator doesn't have to work harder to make up the difference.

3- Replacing the battery. Most people replace a battery when it fails, but with these notoriously weak stators, special attention is needed. If you jump your bike and let the stator charge it up, that's a serious and damaging drain. If at all possible, avoid that. On a lesser, but still prominent note, batteries that are a couple years old will lose more charge when it sits and cause the stator to work harder, plus just generally cause more draw as it ages. If you replace your battery every couple of years then you will probably contribute to stator health.

So to recap- grease the connections, replace the battery frequently, no accessories, and you probably could get 50k out of it. (That's just my theory anyway, formulated from what I've been reading in the time I've been active in these forums)
All good suggestions .
I would like to add when storing use a battery tender. The 900 comes with a sealed battery so the acid will not boil out. My 09 has the original battery with only 4500miles and has survived because of this. The bike cranks over fast.
 

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There was a fairly detailed thread a while back itemizing the things that people who had longer lasting stators were doing.

1- NO accessories. Kawasaki may say that the Stator can handle 70 watts over, but the fact is the people that got more life out of it had basically nothing over stock, no light bars, no espresso makers, etc.

2- Di-electric grease on connections. It's been theorized that the stator ends up working overtime due to moisture and corrosion on certain connections, such as the battery, and especially the regulator. Take the plugs out of the regulator, spray in some di-electric grease, and use the same stuff on the battery terminals. Keeps the juices flowing so the stator doesn't have to work harder to make up the difference.

3- Replacing the battery. Most people replace a battery when it fails, but with these notoriously weak stators, special attention is needed. If you jump your bike and let the stator charge it up, that's a serious and damaging drain. If at all possible, avoid that. On a lesser, but still prominent note, batteries that are a couple years old will lose more charge when it sits and cause the stator to work harder, plus just generally cause more draw as it ages. If you replace your battery every couple of years then you will probably contribute to stator health.

So to recap- grease the connections, replace the battery frequently, no accessories, and you probably could get 50k out of it. (That's just my theory anyway, formulated from what I've been reading in the time I've been active in these forums)
Here Here, what he said +++++.

All good suggestions .
I would like to add when storing use a battery tender. The 900 comes with a sealed battery so the acid will not boil out. My 09 has the original battery with only 4500miles and has survived because of this. The bike cranks over fast.
I heartily agree.

Unfortunately for Me :( I am one of the people reported above, the first one no less, and on an stock 09. The battery took a hit on that, and is now over 3 years old. And she is getting replaced BEFORE she dies.
 
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