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I currently own a Yamaha Vstar 950. I find i drag the boards frequently, particularly when riding 2 up going through traffic circles.

I have read this particular bike is one of the worst.

I am seriously considering buying a 2018 Voyager 1700. Looking for a bigger bike with more power, hopefully more comfortable. Though not sure how much a difference the leg positioning of the voyager will differ. And more luggage space.

I was wondering if the Voyager 1700 would be better in terms of scrapping. But when i look at the ground clearance, it has less at 5.1" than my current 5.7". Would that not suggest less lean angle, more scrapping?

How do you find out specs like lean angle, turning radius etc???? I want to compare various bikes Goldwing, Venture, Electra Glide, Voyager 1700 all vs mine. I know the Voyager 1700 seems like the best bang for buck, but it is so much cheaper than the others, i wonder if it just a inferior bike? I know it has many less features vs Goldwing and Venture, but the Electra Glide? I read various reviews and some suggest the ride is more comfortable on Voyager, power is similar, features similar so are HD that much overpriced??

I don't want to buy something even though it is quite a bit cheaper only to in a few years wish i just saved more and spent it on one of the other bikes.


Maybe I'm asking in a biased forum??
 

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Disclaimer: The opinion mentioned here is my sole opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of others in this forum.

Scraping the floor boards is not motorcycle cycle specific. Scraping the floor boards is strictly the choice of the operator. Motorcycles are made in different " classes" of vehicles. You as a motorcycle rider can purchase a motorcycle to fit almost any riders style. Cruisers are the " laid back " class of the motorcycle world. They are designed to be driven pretty much laid back. Great for people who like to take it easy and clock long hours in the saddle. If you like to "lean em" into the corners like you see on the tracks, cruisers are "NOT" the ideal bike for you. They make many a model which has most of the aspects similar to cruisers but still maintain the sports class aspect. You can lean these bikes tight into corners satisfying that need to touch the ground with your elbow. An almost 1000 pound bike with floor boards isn't really the bike your looking for. Look at Concours 1400 , Fjr yammies, 12 and 1600 beamers. All these can fulfill your dreams much better and still give you cruise ability. Next time your out on your bike, challenge yourself to see how upright you can keep your bike into the corners. Actually it's a lot of fun to try to see how straight up you can keep it, plus you will learn a bit more about yourself as well. Good Luck.
 

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I don't want to buy something even though it is quite a bit cheaper only to in a few years wish i just saved more and spent it on one of the other bikes.


Maybe I'm asking in a biased forum??
Go ride all the bikes you are asking about and make up your own mind. After all... it is your money.
 

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Ground clearance doesn't have much to do with scraping. It's more about speed, the width and how high up on the frame the floorboards are. I rode an 86 Cavalcade, an 06 Roadliner and my 17 Voyager through the Tail of the Dragon and never scraped. Sport touring bikes like the Multistrada, FJR, Motus etc are just sport bikes with bags. If you're into being folded up like a lawn chair, taking corners so fast that you push the envelope of washing out or just seeing how fast you can navigate the Tail or Pike's Peak, then maybe they're more of what you're looking for. The new Voyagers are really comfy and handle well in tight turns. Air shocks in the back will help keep the mufflers from scraping in the sharper bends with a passenger.
 

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The Voyager does have less clearance and will scrap sooner than some other bikes. I had a Honda Sabre VT1100. I could scrap the pegs with it, but I rarely did. There are several places that I never once scrapped with the Sabre that I regularly scrap with the Voyager. I have to go considerably slower in those places to keep from scraping. One of those is an very large intersection (like 4 lanes each direction on one street and 5 each direction on the cross street). It has a sweeping left turn in the direction I come from. I have to slow down on the Voyager to keep from scraping pretty hard. Never had to do that with the Sabre. Another is a long sweeping decreasing radius off ramp. Never once did I scrap with the Sabre. If I don't keep my speed in check, I scrap every time on the Voyager.
 

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Hey,
Yeah like everybody says you can make any bike scrap just slow down a little and you won't. I have only scraped my floor boards a few times and that was when I was ridding unfamiliar back roads and come up on a turn that was sharper than I realized and had to really lean in to it to stay in my lane.
As far as the value I don't think you can beat it compared to other bikes. When I bought mine in April 2017 Kawasaki had a $2,500 rebate then the bike was a 2016 new and I left out the door $14,102 at a dealer ship in Texas. However I did put another roughly $3,000 into it to make it how I wanted. Ivans flash (must have), Intake, exhaust, stereo upgrades, risers, Corbin seat it does add up fast but anyway even with the extras to customize your own bike it is still cheaper than other comparable bikes and it runs great.

Yes HD's are overpriced I had a 2008 Electra Glide Ultra Classic cost me $25,000 out the door in 08 put another $6,000 into it with extras and it did not ride any better than my Voyager at twice the price.

But when it comes down to it is your hard earned money look at them all test ride the ones that they will let you and make up your own mind
 

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Have a friend that had a the 1300 version of your 950. He dragged the boards some too. I had a Venture at the time. Same thing. I have the 1700 Voyager, it does not drag boards as much. But it is still noty hard to do.



Two up on that 950 would certainly drag the boards on sharper turn angles. I rode HD Road Kings for 24 years for a living, they dragged the boards worse. If you drag the boards a lot and don't like it, you should consider your driving style. Dragging boards is easy, replacing boards after you let the road grind through the skid pad and grind the outer 1/2 inch of your board off is expensive. I had to replace the right Voyager board last year after a 3000 miles trip and it was over 80 bucks just for the board. I made a new skid plate/bracket out of stainless steel angle. Should last a little longer.
 

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I'm so used to unlimited lean angle on my BMW R1200RT that when I ride my VN1600 Classic i grind the floorboards far too easily, even on very easy street corners. This Classic used to have shorter shocks on it, that I've changed to the longer stock length. I suspect the PO also installed shorter fork springs which I change to longer springs this winter. I'll also mod the floorboard mounts to raise them up about 1.5". I don't use the heel shifter so I can set up the toe shifter to work with my boots. If this reduces the force angle on the rear brake too, thats not a problem as I only use the rear brake for bike stability, do most all braking with the front.

I don't agree that lean angle is only about the rider. The bike should not limit your riding options, or you must adjust your riding to the bike's limits, and I don't like that.
 

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I don't agree that lean angle is only about the rider. The bike should not limit your riding options, or you must adjust your riding to the bike's limits, and I don't like that.
Actually, every bike will limit your riding options. You should be riding a bike that fits your style. If you require unlimited lean, a heavy V twin cruiser probably isn't your best choice. These bikes are optimized for long distance, open highway riding where sharp turns are few and far between. Your RT was designed for Euorpean touring and that's a completely differnt animal than American touring. Euor-tourning involves much more in the way of winding country roads, mountain switch-backs and a lot more urban riding. So the RT was engineered with tight cornering as a major consideration where the heavy cruisers are designed for long straight runs and high speed sweeping turns. Since the bikes have different priorities the geometry is different.
 

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The Voyager is a handful in low speed maneuvers. It’s long, heavy. Look ahead for parking, not sloped into a curb, like some angled spots. Uphill, to back out of, or drive thru.
I have a sport touring bike to satisfy the need for high speed & corners.
The Voyager is a different mindset, like any cruiser.
 

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You got that right. I had to back my Vaquero out of spot in August. It was slightly uphill. I got rolling just as I came the 2" lip of the sidewalk. To make matters worse, both of my feet where on fine gravel and I couldn't get traction. The shop owner must have been laughing his a$$ off as I fought for what seemed like 10 minutes to get her over that lip. Time to hit the gym!
 

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The only reason i have any cruiser is I dont fit on a sports bike. I ride my Warrior as hard and fast as most sports bike riders. Its raised 2" in the front and 3" in the rear with narrower than stock tires amd 3" peg extensions that push the pegs oit 3" and up 1 1/4" to give me the moat flickability and lean angle.

I JUST bought a 2016 Voyager because wifey has fallen in love with riding with me and its very very difficult to ride the beast slowly. She would be in so much pain scrunched up on the back of the warrior that we only did 200 mile 2up last year. My quest to find a rolling couch began.

I test rode everything I was allowed from a second and third gen Venture, to several Hd Ultras, GoldWings, fjr, concourse, K1600. And the Voyager was the best bang for the buck.

The HDs always felt small and lacking in every way. The second gen Venture seemed like the smoothest with the most torque but I couldnt get past the tape player, carbs, and lack of aftermarket support. The third gen Venture was just amazing but there seem to be bugs in the infotainment center and was way out of my price range, same for the k1600. The Goldwing was the best all around but was so cramped for me that I barely made it back from the test ride. Twice I almost lost my balance because I couldn't get my feet back on the pegs easy enough.

If you want touring and lean angle, Goldwing, k1600, FJR, Concourse. If you want a more.classic cruiser vibe with the latest tech and all around great bike, 2018 Venture. If you just want to putt around nice and comfy with wifey HD or Voyager.

Thats just my opinion.
 

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I took a rider's course (Skilled Rider Course) at one of the local Harley dealers back on Veteran's Day...

Lemme tell you, the Vaquero (and I'd assume the Nomad and Voyager, since they share a lot of the underpinnings) can be much easier to handle at low speeds.

What I learned in the class:

1. Practice, practice, practice!
2. Drag the rear brake at slow speeds, and keep the engine RPMs up a bit (but not a lot - don't want to burn up your clutch!)
3. Keep the handlebars trued when stopping.
4. Use the friction zone of the clutch!
5. Counterweight the bike in slow turns, so you're leaning away from the bike. This, combined with dragging the rear brake and clutch use makes it easy to do lots of slow-speed maneuvers.

If you all are close to a Harley dealer, sign up for this course. For $100, you take YOUR bike and run the gamut of exercises. So worth it!

I was able to do almost all of the exercises. I was still 1-2' outside "the box", and slow S curve was a PITA, but I was close :D I also don't weave well, but am working on it. I completed the rest of the exercises well.

Now, to wait for Spring time :D

-John
 

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Friction Zone makes very low speed maneuvers very easy. Once you get good at it, you an putt-putt around a parking lot without removing your feet from the pegs/boards at slower than walking speeds.
 

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Dragging boards is one of my goals every time I go out. Due to region, this is usually only accomplished at on/off ramps and occasionally tight turns in residential areas. Adjust your suspension accordingly to riding 2 up and work on your riding technique if you don't want to drag
 
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