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I just wanted to share my experience with installing the Garmin 395LM GPS on my 2016 Vaquero, since I haven't been able to find information I wanted.

First, I did some research, and decided I didn't really want to spend $700-800 to get the 595LM, as nice as its few extra features and larger screen may be. Then, I ordered the 395LM from Amazon for $499. Of course, it's now listed at $399, and the 595lm is only $699. Only 3 weeks since I ordered it, ugh.

The 395lm works just fine for what I need it for (not getting lost on the bike), and I've used it to create some "adventurous" routing, and that works. Reviews everywhere talk about the pros and cons of this GPS, so I suggest those who are interested go that route. I'll concentrate on the installation.

First thing I did when I received the GPS was to unbox it, take stock of what all it comes with (and it's a LOT), and lay it all out on my kitchen table. I did a trial fit of the mounts to see how they work, and then took stuff out to my bike. Pro tip: use your pickup truck's tailgate (if you have one) as a work bench - makes life easy!)

The include U-bolt for the mount was too narrow to fit around my Vaquero's handlebars, and the also-included handlebar control extended bolts were too short, so neither of the instruction manual's listed installation methods were going to work. Luckily, the U-bolt fits around the right-side mirror mount (the hexagonally-shaped base of the mirror), and after several hundred miles, it hasn't come loose.

Next step, power. While I originally wanted to use the Kawasaki power port in the right side of the fairing (which I also ordered with the Garmin), the motorcycle mount precludes you from doing this, since it blocks the power input on the Garmin (the car mount is narrower, allowing you to use it there). So that was a no-go. Oops.

I rode for a couple of weeks where I only used the Garmin when necessary, and the claimed battery life of 7 hours seems pretty accurate. I charged it at home using a wall-mounted USB outlet and the mini USB cable (the latter was included, the former was not).

Fast forward to last night. I had prepped the included motorcycle power wires by installing crimp-on ring terminals, as the wire comes bare (but soldered ends - no split ends!). I went out to the bike and removed the GPS mount and the bike's seat. The battery box top comes off easily enough once you move the connectors out of the way, slide the gray one out of its holder, and remove 2 phillips head screws.

The same phillips head screwdriver removes the two battery terminal bolts.

Attaching the Garmin's power cable was easy enough, but I already had ring terminals installed for my heated gloves, so it was a bit tricky getting the battery terminal bolts to bite into the square nuts on the battery. I had to use a tiny flat head screwdriver to position the square nuts below the bolt, push down with my phillips head screwdriver, and use gentle pressure to ensure I didn't cross thread the bolts.

With that accomplished, I realized that since I was unable to route the wires for the GPS back towards the stock wiring, I had to slice open the red rubber positive battery terminal cover. No biggie there. I then reinstalled the battery box cover and routed the GPS' power wires out through the pass through built into the aforementioned cover.

I wanted to route the power wire underneath the tank, but there simply didn't seem to be enough of it, so I undid the right-side allen bolt on the gas tank trim piece (the front-to-back plastic piece that surrounds the gas cap), and tucked the power wire underneath of it. Then, the end of the wire came out at the front of the tank and went straight up to the handlebars (I did this whole install with the handlebars turned full left - where the GPS' power wire would be fully stretched).

I followed the GPS' install instructions and threaded the end of the power wire through the mount and used the provided screw to secure it in place, threaded the weather cap for the power wire through the mount, and reinstalled the mount on the bike. I had JUST ENOUGH wire to get this done. A future clean-up would involve using power inside the fairing, but time was not on my side this time.

The Garmin power wire includes a 2A fuse close to the battery, which I tucked underneath the battery cover, as well as what I think is a control box, which I simply left sitting on top of the fuses and relays in front of the battery box. Hopefully this is OK.

I hope this helps someone else looking to add navigation to their bike and DIY the install. It may be slightly ugly, but it works, and that's what matters to me.

-John
 

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I have the Zumo 340 on my Voyager. Below the radio, there are two openings to get cable in or out of the fairing. If you remove the headlight and look inside the fairing, there are 5 connectors on the right side (left in driving direction).

1x switched ignition power
1x ground

1x left speaker
1x right speaker
1x speaker ground

connect them to a 3.5mm male audio jack, route it through the fairing out to the gps and you will hear the directions via your fairing speakers

If you use them, your GPS will turn on and off with the ignition. Connect the audio jack to the gps and . . . tha's it.


Cu,
Sven
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have the Zumo 340 on my Voyager. Below the radio, there are two openings to get cable in or out of the fairing. If you remove the headlight and look inside the fairing, there are 5 connectors on the right side (left in driving direction).

1x switched ignition power
1x ground

1x left speaker
1x right speaker
1x speaker ground

connect them to a 3.5mm male audio jack, route it through the fairing out to the gps and you will hear the directions via your fairing speakers

If you use them, your GPS will turn on and off with the ignition. Connect the audio jack to the gps and . . . tha's it.


Cu,
Sven
Any chance you've got a pic of this? I can't seem to find one. If not, do you know the colors/type of connectors for each connection?

When I get the time to re-do it, this is the route I want to take.

Thanks!

-John
 

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Is anyone with a gps able to compare how well the "nice" systems do compared to google maps on a smartphone? I use maps on my iPhone and find that the "no highways" option usually generates great off the beaten path options. It's "free" given my smartphone contract. I find myself wondering how much I might be missing not having a real gps.

Happy and safe riding,
Dan
 

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I did the same with my Garmin wiring. I used a RAM Mount in the center of the handlebars.

I have the Zumo 340 on my Voyager. Below the radio, there are two openings to get cable in or out of the fairing. If you remove the headlight and look inside the fairing, there are 5 connectors on the right side (left in driving direction).

1x switched ignition power
1x ground

1x left speaker
1x right speaker
1x speaker ground

connect them to a 3.5mm male audio jack, route it through the fairing out to the gps and you will hear the directions via your fairing speakers

If you use them, your GPS will turn on and off with the ignition. Connect the audio jack to the gps and . . . tha's it.


Cu,
Sven
 

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I've look longingly at Garmin's Zumo's now & then, but just can't get past the price to feature ratio.

For less than 1/5th of that price I bought a basic Garmin lifetime map & traffic model with a 5" screen designed for a car, with a RAM cradle specific to that model, plus mount in the center of the bars. Wired another cig lighter type outlet inside the fairing for the traffic specific power plug to be permanently taped & zip-tied into it, and stuff the lead through one of those slots Sven mentioned when I'm not using it.

I thought that for that price, who cares about IPX whatever waterproofing, I can buy another one if it ever dies when it gets wet, and still be four times ahead.

That was five years ago, and the first one is still going strong. When it gets too wet, I take it off the bars or put it in a plastic bag, and the few sudden downpours it's been caught in have not had any ill effect.

I also figure if I'm riding in very wet weather AND don't know where I am - isn't it time to find a coffee shop or a bar anyway?

And Dan, you're right - smartphone's will take over from specific GPS devices one day, and Google Maps are getting better all the time. I don't use the sound on my GPS at all, but have sometimes in heavy rain put the Garmin away and set my iPhone to provide directions by bluetooth to my Sena, from the safety of inside the trunk... I have 3 USB outlets in there to keep all the tech charged up.
 

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Is anyone with a gps able to compare how well the "nice" systems do compared to google maps on a smartphone? I use maps on my iPhone and find that the "no highways" option usually generates great off the beaten path options. It's "free" given my smartphone contract. I find myself wondering how much I might be missing not having a real gps.

Happy and safe riding,
Dan
I don't use the "nice" gps' while touring, but use the cheaper Garmin's for my trips. Nonetheless, to answer your question, one of our traveling group used to use his phone and has since gone to a gps unit. Often his phone often wouldn't give turn instructions quick enough and we'd have to loop back to pick up routes. Also, when traveling in remote or mountainous areas, he would lose his signal and would be "lost" until the signal came back in range. Usually one of us with a gps would have to take over the lead. Also, his phone's screen would be hard to see in sunlight vs a gps unit. and then there's the difference in screen size. Personally, I think a phone is fine for short trips, but for longer trips where you want to do some exploring I think a dedicated gps is hard to beat.
 

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Any chance you've got a pic of this? I can't seem to find one. If not, do you know the colors/type of connectors for each connection?

When I get the time to re-do it, this is the route I want to take.

Thanks!

-John
Here is the link to the Kawi Adapter cable :

https://www.kawasaki.com/Accessories/Item/VN1700KGF/K10400046

and the link for the installation manual :

https://www.kawasaki.com/Content/Uploads/Accessories/K10400046/ii_K10400046.pdf

locate the Navigation Accessory Connectors at the left side of the radio (rider’s view) adjacent to the Accessory Power Connectors. Connect the three bullet connectors on the Nav Audio Cable to the radio Nav Accessory Connectors as follows:

Nav Audio Cable GREEN connects to Radio Nav Ground PINK
Nav Audio Cable BLUE connects to Radio Left Channel GRAY
Nav Audio Cable Yellow connects to Radio Right Channel VIOLET

Zumo power wire RED (+) connects to Nav Power WHITE
Zumo Power wire BLACK (-) connects to Nav Ground YELLOW/Black



Cu,
Sven
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here is the link to the Kawi Adapter cable :

https://www.kawasaki.com/Accessories/Item/VN1700KGF/K10400046

and the link for the installation manual :

https://www.kawasaki.com/Content/Uploads/Accessories/K10400046/ii_K10400046.pdf

locate the Navigation Accessory Connectors at the left side of the radio (rider’s view) adjacent to the Accessory Power Connectors. Connect the three bullet connectors on the Nav Audio Cable to the radio Nav Accessory Connectors as follows:

Nav Audio Cable GREEN connects to Radio Nav Ground PINK
Nav Audio Cable BLUE connects to Radio Left Channel GRAY
Nav Audio Cable Yellow connects to Radio Right Channel VIOLET

Zumo power wire RED (+) connects to Nav Power WHITE
Zumo Power wire BLACK (-) connects to Nav Ground YELLOW/Black



Cu,
Sven
Thanks - when I get the time, I'll go ahead and do this. I've got bullet connectors already, thanks for the color-coding :D

-John
 

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You are welcome !

Cu,
Sven
 
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