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Discussion Starter #1
I came across a 2010 Nomad 1700 on the interwebs yesterday... at the dealer where I bought my current '01 1500 Classic, and it only has 2,100 miles on it (the Nomad for sale, NOT my Classic).

I know if I was looking at a car, I could expect gaskets and seals to start leaking soon after purchasing and driving due to them drying out from no use over the years. Is this common with motorcycles?

Is there anything I should be concerned with when considering buying a practically brand new eleven year old bike?

I know about the ignition wire recall and that's easy enough to verify whether this bike is part of the recall and if so if the work has been done.

I'm more concerned with it being ridden only a few times over the last eleven years.
 

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If its not leaking on a test ride I wouldn't expect to start all of the sudden just because of the age.
 

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I came across a 2010 Nomad 1700 on the interwebs yesterday... at the dealer where I bought my current '01 1500 Classic, and it only has 2,100 miles on it (the Nomad for sale, NOT my Classic).

I know if I was looking at a car, I could expect gaskets and seals to start leaking soon after purchasing and driving due to them drying out from no use over the years. Is this common with motorcycles?

Is there anything I should be concerned with when considering buying a practically brand new eleven year old bike?

I know about the ignition wire recall and that's easy enough to verify whether this bike is part of the recall and if so if the work has been done.

I'm more concerned with it being ridden only a few times over the last eleven years.
Well, purchase it, change all your fluids, all of them.....refresh your tires, period. I know their tires, but would you wanna risk your life to 2 small pieces of rubber costing less the $250?
Anyway, change all you fluids, tires and start making her your own.......if battery even looks at you the wrong way, replace it also....
 
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This question comes up a lot. First off it’s a Nomad, buy the bike. If not done by the dealer before purchase, do the following.
Check the fuel tank with a flashlight for any corrosion or rust.
Change oil and filter.
Replace tires, tire valves, (tubes, and rim strips if equipped)
Load test battery. (Replacement should be a good AGM type)
Check all fuel lines, vacuum hoses, and coolant hoses.
Depending on mileage and bike, adjust valves.
Replace coolant.
Replace brake fluid and check hoses.
Replace clutch fluid. (If equipped)
Replace front fork oil.
Replace the spark plugs. Use the iridium type replacements.
Check steering head bearings.
Use some spray electrical cleaner/lubricant and clean side stand, kill, starter, and clutch switches.
Lube clutch and throttle cables.
Check and adjust drive belt.
Check and clean all other components on the bike and check for tightness.
Also, post us some pictures when you get your new ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies/suggestions.

I went and checked it out yesterday. I did not fall in love with it the way I did my Classic when I first saw IT.

The Nomad has some really key things going for it that have me still considering it.

Pros:

  • 9 Years newer than my Classic
  • ~43k miles fewer than my Classic
  • Engine doesn't knock and click and whir (cam chain) like my Classic
  • It's a 1700 vs my 1500, 6 speed vs my 5 speed, rims NOT made of butter like my Classic's spoked rims :rolleyes:
  • It comes with a 2 year warranty

Cons:

  • I've never liked hard bags (my Classic has leather)
  • The bike is BONE STOCK and quite frankly looks kinda funny - my Classic has custom... well, almost everything.
  • It would wipe me out financially leaving no money for MUCH needed upgrades... SEAT first! ($500) then exhaust ($800)


I took it out for a ride but it was 20-30 mph gusting winds... hard to really tell how it feels when testing it out in those types of conditions (even though that's fairly normal for Delaware!). It's got some pretty insane power compared to mine, in the higher gears especially.. and that sixth gear is a MUCH needed addition for highway cruising (and let's face it, Delaware's roads are 90% dead straight and flat). It actually felt TINY compared to my Classic... I think because of the stock seat which is really tall and pushes you way forward into the gas tank. The Mustang seat on my Classic allows my buttend to be lower and further back. Riding the Nomad felt like riding a Goldwing :sick: only with a beautiful, although ridiculously quiet, V-Twin rumble.


I don't know. I'm torn. I want it because of the engine an transmission and low miles... but it's a lot of money to invest in a bike that I don't really like the way it looks (and feels - as is).


Here's one of the Dealer's pics of the Nomad, followed by a short clip of my Classic:

247277


 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh yeah... another con: It's an extra $800 over asking price for dealer prep/paperwork etc. ($300 ish of which is tax/title/reg which I'd have to pay even with a private sale). That $500 above the state stuff is just a f*@$ing ripoff as far as I'm concerned.
 

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Nice looking bike with low miles. Offer the dealer $500 less than you are willing to spend. Don’t give a crap about his reaction. Then if he counters within your range, buy it. If not tell him thanks and you know where to find me. Let the dealer mull it over. It is February in Delaware. Then see if he calls. And yes, dealer fees is just another term for more gross profit.
 

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That 6th gear really is something to consider if you are doing road trips etc. I agree with Tourer above....shoot the dealer a lowball and gauge reaction. Are they essentially trying to get MSRP for an 11 year old bike?? All those dealer add on costs are BS. Good luck!
 

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On another note. How old are those tires? If over 5 years figure a new set into the price. Around 350 to 500 bucks. Look at the 4 digit DOT code embossed into the sidewalls. First two numbers are the week and the second two are the year of manufacture. If it needs tires tell the dealer you want new ones at your lower price. All the other work you can do yourself. When you sell the Classic take off the accessories and sell them separately. This will give you some dollars to your new seat and exhaust.
The Nomad should ride more like a touring bike. It is heavier and designed for touring. Once you get used to it, you’ll love it.
What is the dealer asking for this bike.
 

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Def agree on tires. If they are OEM they were made at least 21 years ago. If you bought a set online and discovered vendor had sent you 21 year old tires, you would likely not be a happy camper!
 

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with any vehicle be it motorcycle or car or truck or bus, rubber gaskets and seals and rubber hoses will become progressively worse over time and not miles travelled, even to a brand new bike never used in 10 years, same thing
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks everyone for your thoughts/input/suggestions!

So I went and took the Nomad out for another test ride yesterday... a little less windy, and at times, a little less traffic. Plus I took it around the Dealer's preset test ride route (which is actually a pretty decent route, albeit short). But I asked if I could take it for a few laps and he said to feel free. So I did!

I'd been very hung up on comparing it to my Classic. But yesterday, I let the bike be itself. And I kinda liked it ;)

I still don't like the seat, but.... the torque on that thing is just sick. Doesn't matter what gear you're in... open the throttle a bit and just starts a-pullin'. No bog, no lag, no hesitation. It is so easy to come to a nice slow smooth stop, where-as my Classic, once I'm slow enough to hit first gear, it feels like I'm trying to balance on a piece of plywood standing on edge. Arms, knees and body doin' all kinds o' weird side to side motions for the last few feet before putting my feet down! Make's me look like I've never ridden before! (But that's a whole OTHER thread!)

For such a heavy bike, it some kind of nimble and light feeling!

It was also warm enough to wear my beanie helmet instead of my full-face so could hear the bike a lot better. There's no cam noise above the wind and exhaust like my Classic (which has loud exhaust, mind you) and no clunky knocking.

Anyway. I won't ramble any more... you guys know it's a great bike!



Dealer was asking $6,500 which comes in just a pinch over book. But again, 2,100 MILES on it!

I'm picking it up this afternoon for $6,000! (Plus the ~$800 in state and dealer fees.)

TIRES -----
I did not look at the tire dates ahead of time. I basically just looked them over the best I could looking for any signs of rot. They LOOK good. But. Once I get it home I will check the dates. I can't imagine they're OEM as they are different from front to rear. I'm guessing the dealer installed used ones when they serviced the bike before putting it up for sale. They appear to have a decent amount of tread, so as long as the dates are within five or six years old....


with any vehicle be it motorcycle or car or truck or bus, rubber gaskets and seals and rubber hoses will become progressively worse over time and not miles travelled, even to a brand new bike never used in 10 years, same thing
I guess I'm probably just still used to the old school cork gaskets from back in the day!


I absolutely love the stance and attitude my Classic has... like my dad says, it looks like a biker's bike. The Nomad looks like a NEW bike. But that's kinda the point. You can't ride "pretty", but you can ride "reliable" ALL FRIGGIN' DAY LONG (and well into the night if I can find a light bar for it! :D:D:D:D)
 

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Congratulations on your new ride. Make sure to post us some more pictures when you get a chance. Double check the tires before paying for the bike. Once you take the bike, any changes might be refused. Make sure of their age, size. type (bias or radial), and speed rating. Make sure they replaced both. Might have just replaced the rear and the front is original. If so get them to rectify before finalizing the deal. Here is a link to the factory repair manual for reference.

Front tire 130/90B16 67H
Rear tire 170/70B16 75H

 

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Congrats. I had a used 78 Gold Wing for 12 years and 75K miles. Great bike but when I let it go for a used 2004 Yamaha V Star 1100, I discovered that motorcycle brakes had come a long ways in 28 years! Progress. And...I know your budget is tight but having Ivan reflash the OEM ECU is the single best upgrade I will ever do to my bone stock 2016 Voyager. A brand new bike. Ivan's Performance Products
 

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One of the major things with these bikes is that they are of such great reliability and build quality, some folks just ride the hell outta them because they're so reliable, then when the 2nd or 3rd owner get the bike, it still has the original brake fluid, coolant, and often times, they don't even change the oils correctly or periodically like they are supposed to.
The guys just don't do it to be evil, these bikes just run and run and run....sometimes by the time you get them, their fluids are just worn out.
THAT is the reason why when your Nomad or any Vulcan VTwin that has a bunch o miles on her, you need to change ALL your fluids, all your filters and plugs....and any other physical maint. stuff that coencide with your bikes mileage.
This is why a good repair manual is like your bible....it gives you all this info....
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Yeah, I'm guilty of that type of abuse when I was young and dumb! 🤣

My 01 Classic had 32k when I got 2 years ago and I've changed the oil every 3.5-4k, but no other fluids (except the final drive 'cause it sprung a leak!).

The fact that this Nomad has 2,200 miles on it and is just a hair shy of mint condition, I will be maintain it by the book... literally! I want this puppy to last!

On the tires... I asked the salesdude about them and he didn't know if their service guys put them or not... the service sheet says new tires. So we walked back to talk to the service manager and he said no, they were on it but are new tires. I was skeptical so I asked if they knew HOW new. He got down on his back under the pipes to find the date stamp and said "well look at this. The rear still has the [hjdndbdh] on them" I couldn't tell what he said. But the salesdude went to the front tire and said "yeah, same with the front tire" and pointed at the little rubber hairs that stick out of new tires. They hadn't even been worn off yet. Then ther vice manager said "twenty second week of 2019". So yeah, they are basically new tire, mismatched, but new. Only a little more than a year since manufacture.



I DO have a question tho. My Classic's cooling fan never kicked on unless it was pushing 100 degrees out and was stuck at a light. The Nomad's fan was kicking on at lights when it was 50 degrees this afternoon and even 40 degrees tonight when I took it for a spin after supper.

Is that normal?
 

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where is the temp gauge when the fan kicks on? If it is like my stock 2016, the bike would run pretty hot even in cold weather. I Ivanized at the 2000 mile mark and one of the things it does is have the fan come on 20 degrees sooner. Runs cooler also Ivanized as it lessens the affects of the very lean running stock ECU. Ivanizing will be the best single mod I will ever do to my otherwise bone stock bike.... I just got the 9/20 free update from him and he said that will be the last update he does for the 1700 Ivan's Performance Products
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The 2010 Nomad doesn't have a temp gauge. After my last post, I did see another thread from years ago asking the same question and everyone seemed to have the same thought... if the dummy light isn't on, then it's not overheating.

But if that cooling fan runs that much when it's only 40 degrees out, how the heck is gonna keep the engine cool when it's 100 degrees out?!

Chances are it's normal, much like a car with a fan that kicks on and off all winter long, it's just the first bike I've owned where the fan kicks on at such low outside temps. 🤷‍♂️
 

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You will get a much better sense of the heat the bike produces this summer. When I brought my Voyager home brand new it was 23 degrees F. The temp gauge would get over to 3/4 even then. Again....Ivanizing cured that. Lean running ECU stock.
 

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Ivanizing will be the best single mod I will ever do to my otherwise bone stock bike.... Ivan's Performance Products
On the website, he states "Includes fueling changes - External fuel tuner not needed for 99% of setups - just plug in and go !!'

Is this REALLY the case? If the ecu fuel curve is programmed for stock exhaust and you put straight thru pipes on, it'll be waaaay to lean. So if he reprograms the fuel curve to run rich enough to accommodate straight pipes, if the stock exhaust is still on it, wouldn't it just be spewing too much gas? I could understand if my Nomad had O2 sensors (which some do, mine don't), it could adjust according to rich/lean conditions in the exhaust... but without that... I don't know. I'm skeptical.
 
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