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Hello everyone, most often a reader but seldom post, until now. Opinions needed please. Live in DFW Texas, in June planning a trip to Yellowstone, riding all the way and back with a few buddies, taking about 10 days...Heres my concern. Will the 900 stand up to the long days and several k's of mileage. The high revs at highway speed have always concerned me, even after 3 years of ownership. Normal habit is day trips, and never a problem once. I guess I'm trying to keep the demons from telling me I need a "big" bike to make a run like this...I certainly do not want to ruin a great machine..

Crutch
 

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I take (3) 7 day trips on my bike every year. Maybe not the same miles you will be looking at as I do a round 1700 each trip but other than a flat tire, my 2007 900 Classic LT has performed without a hitch. Alot of those miles are climbing mountains and switchbacks in TN, WV, AK. I think you will be fine. I just recently changed out to the new Baron front pulley to lower that engine speed. Looking forward to a trip on it following winter.
 

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Hello everyone, most often a reader but seldom post, until now. Opinions needed please. Live in DFW Texas, in June planning a trip to Yellowstone, riding all the way and back with a few buddies, taking about 10 days...Heres my concern. Will the 900 stand up to the long days and several k's of mileage. The high revs at highway speed have always concerned me, even after 3 years of ownership. Normal habit is day trips, and never a problem once. I guess I'm trying to keep the demons from telling me I need a "big" bike to make a run like this...I certainly do not want to ruin a great machine..

Crutch
The 900 will make that trip no sweat.

Rod
 

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Love to read a ride report on how you made out with the trip
 

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Took my wife's f650gs last year to Arctic circle. Realized could have done it easily on my 900 vulcan. This year going back again with it and maybe drag wife along just because lol
 

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The "high" RPM will not damage your engine. Redline is 7000 and max HP is 5900, so 4000-4500 cruising RPM is safe to run pretty much forever. My 250 ran 8000-9000 RPM at 75-80mph for over 500 miles also with no issues. Your butt might wear out (I suggest an airhawk pad, which does a great job filtering out vibrations) but these small engines are meant to run higher RPM than a car.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Great information. I really appriciate all the input. This is what I needed, although I think I will change the pully. The 900 is a great bike, I will enjoy riding it on a big adventure..
 

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Would love it if you decide to post a daily journal. I love to read them.

Did 1,500 miles in one trip last summer. Put 20k on the bike in total last year. It'll do it. The high RPMs are a comfort thing, not a reliability thing. Some people are bothered by the vibrations of higher RPM's, other are coming off of low-revving bikes and just can't get used to the sound (most people shift by sound so they don't like riding around feeling like they are in 4th gear). If neither of those things bother you, then you'll be just fine running her at highway speeds all day. Otherwise, the Pulley's are the way to go!

A couple of pointers;

1) Have a 'plan' for a flat. You have tubed tires on an LT, that means they cannot easily be patched if you get a flat. I carry a bottle of slime, a small 12v compressor, roadside assistance on my insurance, and a credit card. Slime comes in a green bottle and is pure magic, works really well. But it's not a permanent solution. If it should ever happen, I would air up the tire and add the slime (you NEED a compressor, slime requires you to remove the valve stem, you'll also need a way to get the tire a little off the ground if possible.) Then at the next stop, find a dealer and get a tire put on. I also usually map out the motorcycle dealers/shops that have good reviews and look like they'll carry any parts/tires/etc. I might need. She has never left me stranded and I've never had a flat... but it CAN happen and I don't want to ruin my vacation by being unprepared for it!

Definitely carry all of the incidental weather gear you can. Change of clothes, rain gear, warm clothes, extra gloves, etc.

Also, my general rule-of-thumb is to get gas every 150-175 miles or so. Reason 1, is it gives you plenty of 'reserve' fuel in case you under-estimate how far away the next station is, and reason 2, if you are planning a long riding day (500+ miles or so), having those frequent short stops to get gas will help keep you from getting too tired or sore on a long jaunt.

Advice I've always gotten that I also think is perfect for any long trip, don't push it. I made that mistake a couple times, trying to push myself to get to the next destination, another 50 miles or so when I was already sore. No good, then you've got the rest of the ride sore and worn out! Stop if you need to, go if you don't!

-John
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Will do, Thanks...The flat issue is on my mind. I have a port. compressor I have carried, but will also bring spare tubes, front and back, slime is a good idea, used it some in the past..Thank you for all the input..
 

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Would love it if you decide to post a daily journal. I love to read them.

Did 1,500 miles in one trip last summer. Put 20k on the bike in total last year. It'll do it. The high RPMs are a comfort thing, not a reliability thing. Some people are bothered by the vibrations of higher RPM's, other are coming off of low-revving bikes and just can't get used to the sound (most people shift by sound so they don't like riding around feeling like they are in 4th gear). If neither of those things bother you, then you'll be just fine running her at highway speeds all day. Otherwise, the Pulley's are the way to go!

A couple of pointers;

1) Have a 'plan' for a flat. You have tubed tires on an LT, that means they cannot easily be patched if you get a flat. I carry a bottle of slime, a small 12v compressor, roadside assistance on my insurance, and a credit card. Slime comes in a green bottle and is pure magic, works really well. But it's not a permanent solution. If it should ever happen, I would air up the tire and add the slime (you NEED a compressor, slime requires you to remove the valve stem, you'll also need a way to get the tire a little off the ground if possible.) Then at the next stop, find a dealer and get a tire put on. I also usually map out the motorcycle dealers/shops that have good reviews and look like they'll carry any parts/tires/etc. I might need. She has never left me stranded and I've never had a flat... but it CAN happen and I don't want to ruin my vacation by being unprepared for it!

Definitely carry all of the incidental weather gear you can. Change of clothes, rain gear, warm clothes, extra gloves, etc.

Also, my general rule-of-thumb is to get gas every 150-175 miles or so. Reason 1, is it gives you plenty of 'reserve' fuel in case you under-estimate how far away the next station is, and reason 2, if you are planning a long riding day (500+ miles or so), having those frequent short stops to get gas will help keep you from getting too tired or sore on a long jaunt.

Advice I've always gotten that I also think is perfect for any long trip, don't push it. I made that mistake a couple times, trying to push myself to get to the next destination, another 50 miles or so when I was already sore. No good, then you've got the rest of the ride sore and worn out! Stop if you need to, go if you don't!

-John
A big +1 on the 12 Volt Compressor. Even if you don't have an accessory plug, you can cut the plug off and wire it to your battery when you need it. Also don't rely on gas station air compressors. They are FULL of water. I had a flat last year and did not have a compressor with me. I put some "Slime" like stuff in it from the gas station and drop a few quarters in the compressor outside. There was enough water in it to keep the slime from sealing good enough. I was about 100 miles from home on memorial day weekend. That means no shops open (Except one HD Shop, but they would not touch the bike that's another story:mad:). I had to stop 3 times to air the tire up to make it home. NOT FUN. It will ruin a trip if you are on a time line to get back home so you can get back out to work the next day.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The compressor is made for motorcycles, with alligator clips, used to carry it and a plug kit when on a GW, since no tubes.
 

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Hey Crutch, I've made two trips on my 900; one to Pagosa Springs, CO the other to Red River, NM. The 900 will handle it fine, and will keep up with bigger bikes with ease. I also have the SW front pulley and a size larger rear tire. My speedometer is now 1 mph over what my GPS shows. If you're bored going through the panhandle of Texas, don't count on Pandora radio to keep you entertained, not good reception (well, on AT&T). MP3 or maybe a radio with an antennae might work better. Both of my trips were in August, the last two summers. June might not be that bad. I did leave early in the morning, trying to get to Amarillo before it's too hot. Can't really say it worked well, but that's August. Enjoy your trip, looking forward to the trip report and lots of pictures!
P.S....I also think every once in a while about getting a bigger bike, but the 900 has shown me it can do everything I could want to do and more. Plus, it's paid for.
 

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Hey Crutch, I've made two trips on my 900; one to Pagosa Springs, CO the other to Red River, NM. The 900 will handle it fine, and will keep up with bigger bikes with ease. I also have the SW front pulley and a size larger rear tire. My speedometer is now 1 mph over what my GPS shows. If you're bored going through the panhandle of Texas, don't count on Pandora radio to keep you entertained, not good reception (well, on AT&T). MP3 or maybe a radio with an antennae might work better. Both of my trips were in August, the last two summers. June might not be that bad. I did leave early in the morning, trying to get to Amarillo before it's too hot. Can't really say it worked well, but that's August. Enjoy your trip, looking forward to the trip report and lots of pictures!
P.S....I also think every once in a while about getting a bigger bike, but the 900 has shown me it can do everything I could want to do and more. Plus, it's paid for.
Bingo.

I've thought about a bigger bike. Voyager maybe. I do a lot of touring and having electronic cruise control and a factory stereo with handlebar controls instead of an aftermarket setup would be nice.. but so far I haven't had a single time when I said "Oh, you know I'd like to but all I have is that 900 over there!" So, while I kind of want a voyager or something, I just haven't really been motivated to go look at them or anything... The 900 does everything I need, and (almost) paid for, and without having to go sign new papers and change insurance and all that stuff. Guess that's what it boils down to. If my 900 was totaled or got stolen, I'd probably buy a bigger bike. But, what I'd gain in a bigger bike, isn't even worth the effort of trading her in right now. The 900 was perfect for me, a brand spanking new rider on his first motorcycle (no dirtbikes or anything), and she was able to be forgiving enough, light enough to 'catch' and never drop.. and once I had a few thousand miles under my belt, she still didn't mind hitting the freeway or the long windy roads for a few hours.

It doesn't do it BETTER than the bigger bikes, but I think I'd wager to say it does it better than anything else in it's class (that I've ridden), and does it plenty well enough for tour up touring and not feeling like you were at a disadvantage because you didn't have a bigger bike. The big bikes are just 'nicer' not 'necessary'.

Oddly, my wifes 750 shadow revs slower than my 900. But it vibrates a lot more, and bounces around and blows around on the highway a lot more. So engine RPM's aren't everything! Unless you want to cruise at 110 with a camper trailer and 300lbs of luggage, it's got the power. Wife and I can and have done 80, two up, loaded down with three dufflebags of luggage and a stuffed-full tour pak and hard bags, while pushing a very big windshield adjusted all the way up. That's probably about all she had (for sustained speeds anyway, any faster and she'd probably slow down going up a hill if you didn't downshift), but what more do you need for that type of riding? How fast do you really wanna go two up and luggage laden? 80 is faster than I want to go, but we were trying to beat out some impending storms and were only about 70 miles from home, so I brought it up to 80 from 65 for the last part of our trip.
 
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