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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a 2006 1500 classic that won't crank. It has been sitting over a year. It is fuel injected, I changed the sparkplugs and have the battery charging for a week. It will turn over but won't fire up. Any idea?
 

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fuel, spark, air all required to be able to run.

Even though your spark plugs are new, I would confirm that both are sparking because other issues can cause no spark. once spark is confirmed, this would rule out most issues with the ignition system such as coils, wires, etc.

air is easy to check and likely not a cause. make sure the air filter isn't clogged up.

the next step would be to confirm fuel. i am not too familiar with these fuel injected vulcans, but i am sure they are throttle body injection. confirm that the throttle body is receiving fuel and that it is sending fuel. Refer to a service manual for specifics.
 

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i forgot to add. since it sit over a year. did you drain the gas and put new gas in there? gas can go bad in as little as a few months. of course, i have no idea what gas you ran. theres gas specifically made for sitting long periods. but if you running standard pump gas id siphon that out and put some fresh gas in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok I will try that. I was going to drain tank, I saw gas gage was on E, thought I would add some and see. At first could hear fuel pump kick on but would not turn over. When I added a little gas it will turn over but not firing. I believe I will pull tank and try to drain
 

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I'm sorry, but for those of us that store bikes over the winter - 6 months of gas sitting does not make it go bad.
I venture a year isnt to much either.
Try using a known good battery to start.
And remember after that long it can take awhile to start.
My carbed bike can take over 6 times cranking to finally start in the spring.
 

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Hi Nichole,
  • You may have an issue with water at the bottom of the tank.
  • Draining would be an option. Adding a fuel enzyme will combine the water with fuel and cause it (water) to go through the pump and be consumed by the engine and exhausted.
  • You could spray a volatile fluid near the airbox intake and see if the engine will run. If it does then you know that fuel delivery is the issue.
  • Tank removal is not required to drain the tank. As you have stated the tank has a pump on it. Use the pump and pump the fuel out. You need to connect the pump to the battery power using small jumper leads. Polarity is important. That is placing the positive lead to the positive and negative to negative.
  • If you choose to remove tank, I recommend that you remove the fuel pump and inspect it. You may also have a fuel filter that is full of dirt and debris. Replace pump body to tank seal on reinstall.
  • Your bike is approaching the 20 year mark. Past the time that hoses and seals should have been replaced.
  • And last, V-doc is correct about fuel degradation. In carbureted bikes where the float bowl is subject to direct atmospheric conditions there is a much higher rate of evaporation and therefore deposits and varnish accumulate on jets. A fuel injection system is relatively closed off from the environment and the long term effects of evaporation are nearly negligible. Fuel injection suffers more from the types of additives in fuel especially Ethanol.
 

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I'm sorry, but for those of us that store bikes over the winter - 6 months of gas sitting does not make it go bad.
I venture a year isnt to much either.
Try using a known good battery to start.
And remember after that long it can take awhile to start.
My carbed bike can take over 6 times cranking to finally start in the spring.
ive had some gas go bad in 3 months. ive also had other gas be just fine after a year. it really does depend and honestly putting in some fresh gas will eliminate that as a factor anyway. i am willing to bet though, the heat down here on the gulf could make a big difference. either way, having fresh gas after sitting over a year is still ideal.
 

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I also going to check my fuses tomorrow, could one of those cause it not to crank?
fuses almost never go bad from sitting but checking all the fuses wouldn't be a bad idea. I don't think it's your issue, but definitely check them all. that should only take a few minutes at most anyway so not really wasting much time.
 

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I just got a 2006 1500 classic that won't crank. It has been sitting over a year. It is fuel injected, I changed the sparkplugs and have the battery charging for a week. It will turn over but won't fire up. Any idea?
if the bike has been sitting without use for more than a year, it's very likely the battery went flat and is now damaged (heavily sulphated) from sitting a long time in a discharged state. I'd replace it regardless that it might seem to take a charge. At the very least bring it somewhere and have it tested.
 

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Hey Nichole,
This is a bit confusing:
It will turn over but won't fire up. Any idea?
I also going to check my fuses tomorrow, could one of those cause it not to crank?
  • Starting, turning over and cranking are the same thing. this means the starter is operating and the crankshaft and other engine mechanicals needed for the combustion process are working to make it happen.
  • Ignition, firing up and running are generally considered the same thing. This means that spark and the air/fuel mixture (vapor) are on time and in the correct ratio respectively to create the burning of combustion cycle.
  • A burned fuse in the main, ignition, starter or other related control circuits could cause the unit to not start or ignite. And in the case of fuel injection to not deliver fuel by either the fuel pump or the injectors if the ECU is fuse protected.
  • So in order to be of any help, I have to ask 'What IS and IS NOT the unit doing as part of the normal start and run process?'
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey Nichole,
This is a bit confusing:


  • Starting, turning over and cranking are the same thing. this means the starter is operating and the crankshaft and other engine mechanicals needed for the combustion process are working to make it happen.
  • Ignition, firing up and running are generally considered the same thing. This means that spark and the air/fuel mixture (vapor) are on time and in the correct ratio respectively to create the burning of combustion cycle.
  • A burned fuse in the main, ignition, starter or other related control circuits could cause the unit to not start or ignite. And in the case of fuel injection to not deliver fuel by either the fuel pump or the injectors if the ECU is fuse protected.
  • So in order to be of any help, I have to ask 'What IS and IS NOT the unit doing as part of the normal start and run process?'
Meaning bike will not start, turn over but won't start
 

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Meaning bike will not start, turn over but won't start
a variety of things could cause that. you really need to start checking things off and working towards finding the problem. your approach needs to be methodological like approaching a math problem. one step at a time working towards a solution. this is the order i would check things.

as others have said, a damaged battery could be providing power but not enough amps to fire up and run.. take the battery to autozone and have it tested for free. they will be able to tell you if you need a new battery. confirm the battery is good. this is perhaps the easiest step. if the battery is bad, and you wanna save cash, get a battery that you can fill the acid yourself. i got one for 60 bucks brand new works great.

check for spark. invest in a spark plug tester only 5 to 10 bucks. super simple. remove the spark plug, leave it in wire, put the tester right on it and press the starter. only takes like 2 minutes. if it is good, you will see a light flash on the tester. if the spark plugs are good, id still recommend gapping them (.032 - .036 for your bike i believe) while you have them out.

if you don't see spark in the tester, immediately go buy new plugs they are cheap anyway only a few dollars a piece. and then gap them, and test the new plugs. if you see a light upon trying to start the bike, you have spark. now. cool, reinstall plugs

however, if you get to this point, and still don't see spark, you potentially have much more serious issues at play. at this point, id recommend inspecting the wires for any corrosion, if you see any corrosion, replace spark plug wires and re try the test. if the wires are good, it may get a little bit more difficult narrowing down what's causing no spark. could be ignition coils, modules, sensors, fuses (check those anyway) , etc.

example, i had a different bike that wouldn't spark due to crank shaft sensor. took a forum of experts to narrow that down... sometimes that happens. hopefully you immediately have spark but i am just being logical here. spark needs to be confirmed.

if you confirm that you have spark and confirm that you have a good battery, now it's time to check for fuel.
honestly, drain the gas tank, put fresh fuel in there. if then it doesn't fire up and run come back to the thread and we can dive more into it.

i know this post seems long, but you can easily do all of easily in less than 2 hours. it really is not much at all.
confirm good battery, then confirm spark, then attempt a start with fresh fuel, then come back if that doesn't work...
 

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Also at this point the plugs could have to much gas on them.
Fuel injected engines will be "flooded" with gas after a few attempts to start.
To remedy that situation hold the throttle fully open and attempt to start. That will clear out the excess fuel.
Do it two to three times, then try starting normally again.
 

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I just got a 2006 1500 classic that won't crank. It has been sitting over a year. It is fuel injected, I changed the sparkplugs and have the battery charging for a week. It will turn over but won't fire up. Any idea?
You only need 3 things for the motor to run. Fuel spark and air. So start at the fuel and see if it is pumping fuel. If good check for spark. If good check the air intake and air filter for clogs. Any one of these not working it won't run.
 
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