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My ecu is perfect NOW WHAT?
Well, that's kind of a shame, because now you face what can be a daunting, tedious, prolonged, and frustrating task.

If the bike was mine, I'd work on finding the short circuit that is taking out the main fuse. Start with a rigorous inspection of all the wiring. Since you say the 30A fuse gets taken out but the other fuses are fine, your short is probably electrically between the + terminal and the fuses, so start by inspecting that wiring. Look for burns, melted connectors, bare insulation, etc.

If you can't find it, you can disconnect the chassis ground, disconnect the ECU plugs -- no sense exposing it to any more electrical insults, since it seems to be just fine now -- pull all the smaller fuses (this is a good time to use your meter to confirm they are all intact), replace the 30A fuse if it is blown, reconnect the chassis ground, and check the main fuse. If it is blown again, you'll have isolated the circuits that could be shorted to those between the 30A fuse and the fuse box. Consult your schematics in your shop manual for the possibilities. (The charging system isn't a bad bet.) If the main is not blown, replace one fuse at a time, checking the main fuse after each replacement. Eventually, it will blow and you'll at least know what circuit has a short.

What you do after that depends on where the short is. It could be as simple as replacing a chunk of scorched wire, it could be replacing some electrical component, it could be replacing the whole wiring harness.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
Thnx guys
Dean, the issue of the analog meter is a dead issue
The ecu is perfect
Road Track and Trail was kind enough to let me try my ecu in their bike.

My issue w looking for a burnt wire is that it is all wrapped, then it goes into the large main harness (never never land)

I have already (before I even joined this forum) looked and tracked as much as I thought I could for a bad melted wire but again "never never land"

I was HOPING someone who knew this bike would say so.ething like "its probably the "-----" so look there and test this way"

Maybe the charging system or magneto for ignition timing etc.....

Safir, what is next??
 

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Discussion Starter #63
The actual positive battery cable I traced back to this and opened it up etc... I will clean it now but no burnt wires nor blown fuse here right on the other end of the pos cable that was what was grounding out on the frame in the first place
ALL other visible wires are wrapped and not showing any signs of any overheated or melted wire(s)
 

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Camber
.....
All I am saying is that Sfair checks everything from A to Z. That way nothing is missed and there is no need to throw money or parts at the bike jumping from one thing to another. When he was asking about the analog meter, the "reading" there is about continuity, not voltage or amps.........

Good luck in your search.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Hopefully I will hear back from him soon
The 1 by 1 fuse adding til main blows is intriguing but w out ecu and everything wired that may be inconclusive maybe?
 

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Hopefully I will hear back from him soon
The 1 by 1 fuse adding til main blows is intriguing but w out ecu and everything wired that may be inconclusive maybe?
Nothing maybe about it. I guarantee it will be "inconclusive", in the sense that it won't precisely locate the short circuit. The idea is to narrow the search area. There's generally no magic single test you can do to track these things -- you have to do a bit of Sherlock Holmes'ing, narrowing down the possibilities until, as Sherlock said, "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

Basic electricity tells us that if the electricity goes through the 30 amp fuse and then a 10 amp fuse, the 10 amp "should" blow first in the case of an overload. (Unfortunately, electricity didn't read the Basic Electricity book, so it doesn't always work out that way.) That's why I suggested you focus your search on the wires and components that come before the fuse box. If you look at the schematic of the charging system, you'll see the only fuse in any of the circuits is that main -- so the charging and starting systems are your prime suspects, but "suspects" is, I think, the best you can do until you narrow the field.

The one-by-one fuse strategy is a way to do that. It's rather crude, in that it involves purposely energizing a short circuit, and since you say your ECU is working fine, I see no reason to expose it to whatever electrical weirdness is going on with your bike until we at least get through some basic troubleshooting with the rest of the circuits. By the time that basic checkout is complete, if there's still no resolution, hopefully our rather amazing human troubleshooting computer will have returned and can provide some next steps for you.

By the way, good ol' "basic electricity" would tell us that shorting your positive terminal to ground shouldn't have done a darned thing to the rest of the bike. The electricity "should" have gone into the chassis and back to the negative terminal, end of story. Obviously, it doesn't seem to have worked quite that way, and that's sort of the root of why this is a tough problem to solve. A 12V lead-acid vehicle battery, even a little motorcycle battery, dumps a huge amount of current into a short -- you can weld steel with one, for a little while. All those amps wanted very, very much to find a path back to that negative terminal, and who knows what "outside the chassis" paths they took? Even if we had someone here who had shorted the positive to ground on exactly the same model bike, chances are slim it would have exactly the same result.

I realize none of this is good news and I'm sorry for that. The yahoo who serviced that battery before you got the bike was incompetent, and you got a raw deal. Sorry about that, too. But, it is, as they say, what it is. We're trying to get you up and running, but this sort of troubleshooting is a bit of a bear.
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Gotcha and agree w your statements in theory
Safir ... help lol
I will never claim to be an electronics minded guy but I am capable and really want to do this myself (w ur guys help)
Thnx
 

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Discussion Starter #72
The analog or digital means nothing now
The ECU is perfect
Not sure which plug is the fuel pump but sure I would try that
Safir, if u r out there what is the scoop on my next move???
 

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Wires are connected to pump under tank. Follow to connector and unplug, turn on switch press start & see if 15 amp fuse still blows.
 

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Wires are connected to pump under tank. Follow to connector and unplug, turn on switch press start & see if 15 amp fuse still blows.
Whoa -- somewhere along the way here I got convinced he was talking about the main, 30A fuse blowing. You're absolutely right, he was referring to an inline 15A. I can't find one on my 900 schematics -- what the heck does that thing go to?
 

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Discussion Starter #75
I have a question what is the 15 amp fuse that's always sitting above the battery where does that go and what is it for because that's what's blowing this fuse and if I knew where to go maybe it's windings on an alternator or it's who knows what does anybody know and yes somebody was saying the 30 amp main fuse that is not what is blowing it's the 15 amp fuse that's directly under the seat directly over the battery
 

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Discussion Starter #76
2005 Vulcan 1500 fi who has the schematic I need to find out what the white and yellow with red wires are those are the two wires that run to the fuse that keeps blowing
 

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The 15 amp fuse is the power supply for the fuel injection system and its related components. That is why I asked you to unplug the fuel pump and see if the fuse still blows. Process of elimination.
 

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I got ahold of a 1500 service manual.

1) What makes you think the relay is it? If you disconnect it the fuse doesn't blow? It would be odd for a relay to blow a fuse. I guess not impossible, but ....a relay is just a switch. Chances are it is something downstream from the relay that the relay is controlling. If this stops the fuse blowing, though, you've made a heck of a find! Well done!

2) How did the fuel pump test go?

3) The cheapest and fastest way to test a relay is to jumper the circuits it is controlling, but to figure out what to jumper to what, you'd need to find that rascal on a schematic.

Are these the wire colors coming out of the socket?

Brown/Yellow
Brown/Red
White/Red
Yellow/Red

If so, that is the DFI Main Relay. When energized, it closes a circuit between the White/Red and Yellow/Red.
 

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Okay, I've had time to look over the schematic. I'm continuing to assume that you pulled that relay, connected the battery, and the DFI fuse did not blow. If that is correct AND IF that is the DFI Main Relay, you have the problem with the short circuit nicely isolated. The DFI Main Relay controls power to:

1) The two injectors

2) The fuel pump

3) The ECU

Through substitution, you know the ECU is good. That leaves the fuel pump and the two injectors as well as the wires to those and to the ECU. The short(s) could be in any of those.

Strongly suggest you do the "disconnect the fuel pump" test. Let us know results and we'll get you to next steps.
 
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