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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at an 06 900 classic touring with very low milage (under 5K). I think that's the first year of the 900's and I'm wondering if it's a good year to buy? Are there any issues?

Also, are there any improvements over the years that are worth getting a newer model?

Thanks for any help/suggestions.

Looking forward to getting off my sv1000s soon....getting too old for the sportbike.
 

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That is a good question! I also bought a 06 900, Just taged this thread so I can also finded out. I bought mine with 30k on it and so far no Issues ( Crossing fingers :D also knocking on wood )
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've heard they're good bikes...I used to have a Vulcan 800 (should have never sold it) I sold it to get a sport bike which I have enjoyed for a couple of years. It's not fun for long rides and I also find myself riding waaaaaaaay to fast. Time to get back on a cruiser.

I'm just really wondering that because 06 is a first year on the model, that there may have been some bugs that they've worked out in later years??? I had read something on line about a sticky throttle at times as well as a stator problem (that's the charging system I think?).

The 06 is a great deal and really low kms so that's what makes it attractive, however if there's issues than I would rather spend a little more and get a newer one.
 

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I've got an '06 900! Bought it with 8k miles. Have 25k on it now. Here's what I'll tell ya;

1) Typically very low mileage bikes are not very tightly maintained. I would flush the coolant, the brakes, and change the oil. No damage is done or anything, it's a fine bike; but it's just not likely that a rider who rode it less than 1,000 miles a year followed Kawasaki's service schedule.

2) The stator failures are most common on '06 and '07 models. Typically anywhere from 15k to 50k to never the Stator will fail. It's not a difficult fix, takes about an hour, costs about $200 including the necessary oil change.

3) No real improvements or changes. The 2013 models have a slightly re-worked seat, and some of the newer models have a black kickstand instead of a chrome one like the '06 will have, and have black switch covers instead of the silver ones your '06 will have. Otherwise, absolutely no changes from '06-'13. The only thing changed every year is the paint scheme.

It'll be a great bike for you. The only issue most folks have is the stock seat. A select few haven't had a problem, but the vast majority of VN900 riders have not liked the stock seat AT ALL and have opted for an aftermarket seat. So, I would budget an extra couple hundred bucks for an aftermarket seat, if it doesn't already have one.

Other than that, a fantastic bike. Known to handle hundreds of thousands of miles, they run and handle like a champ.

-John

Edit: Just noticed your last post. I've never heard of a sticky throttle issue, that's likely an isolated case if you've found it. Just make sure to keep the cable lubed. There was an issue with the EFI system causing it to stall out; but that's fixed with a recall. If it hasn't been done but is needed, the dealer will do it for free. I rode it for 4 months before I knew it had a recall, never had an issue with it stalling out. Didn't notice anything different after they replaced the EFI module either. But, some have said there are some issues with it, and Kawasaki replaces the EFI module, so there ya go!

And yes, the stator is part of the charging system. The 'alternator' is a spinning rotor mounted to the crank, and a bundle of wires mounted in a fixed position called a 'stator'. The insulation on these OEM stators wears out and they short out. I replaced mine at 15k when it failed with an aftermarket one. Even though I had to replace the stator AND the seat (because it was so uncomfortable), I still think this bike was a fantastic value. I really, really enjoy it.
 

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Just bought a '06 900LT last year with 3000 miles on it. Changed oil, filter and drove 1500 miles before winter set in. The only issues are, it has the most uncomfortable seat I've ever had. I'll be replacing that soon with either a Mustang or Corbin. Mine has Vance and Hines pipes and a Dynojet fuel enhancer which I don't feel is tuned just right since it starts hard when cold. It backfires but hasn't been marbled yet. On a personal preference, I've always had naked bikes and the LT's windshield is huge and blocks all the wind. That's nice for touring but I miss the breeze a lot.
 

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Although it may seem minor and correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't there some issue in the early years with bolts/fittings on the bottom of the bike that would break off when you ride over a speed bump etc.?
 

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Although it may seem minor and correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't there some issue in the early years with bolts/fittings on the bottom of the bike that would break off when you ride over a speed bump etc.?
Yessir forgot about that!

There are three grease zerks (like you use to pump grease into something. In fact, that's exactly what they're for!). They are for greasing the swingarm. If you scrape anything, they go away. Look under the bike, they may be broken off- mine were. I just used a pair of vice grips to pull them out, replaced them with a set of set screws, and when I need to grease it (which I've done a whole one time ever) I just remove the set screws (which mount flush, thus won't break off) and install a grease zerk to pump it up.

It's not a big deal, easy to fix. The new bikes don't have ANY zerks down there, that IS something that changed (that I forgot about, thanks for bringing it up Blockhead!) So, I guess Kawasaki figures you don't really need to grease it? Who knows.



The 'missing nipple' is the most common one to disappear, it's pretty easy if your suspension is set soft or you go over a speed bump to scrape that, and rip that zerk right off. In that guys case, he didn't have enough 'meat' to get it off like I did. But an easy-out (extractor) tool would easily pull it out, it's not torqued down real tight or anything.



They look like that, any hardware store will have them (you'll obviously need one much smaller). The ones I've used are all 'backwards' threaded so you actually use them in the left or 'remove' mode on your drill. As they bite IN to the broken grease zerk (which is hallow, which is why this will work so well), they will be torquing it to the left loosing it. After a second or two or drilling it it'll suddenly spin the bolt out. They work great and it's always nice to have a set around.
 
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