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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 05-18-2018, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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Rear shock

Hi folks, looking for some info. Just purchased a 2011 nomad 1700 with 4000 km/ 2500 mi a week ago, family selling since dad has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Safety passed no problem, driving home the same day I noticed a nail in the front tire, bought a new tire had them changed it.
Prior to leaving the dealership they offered to check the air in the rear shock, first one pumped up fine, second one would not inflate. I had to leave to pick up my teenager for a job interview so could not stay to discuss the issue with the dealer. He did call me after hours and told me to look up online for progressives as an option since OEM are so expensive, he also mentioned that he may have a set off of an older bike at the shop and if they fit we can work it out somehow.

My question is 2 parts.
1 am I ok to ride two up for the time being without damaging anything, they seem to think the shock and springs are ok just not pumping up. I’m about 190lbs and wife is 130lbs.

2 - Has anyone replaced their rear shocks and what are good options to look at, can’t find progressive air shocks for my bike.

Any suggestions welcomed.
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 12:14 AM
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I have ÷hlins model HD146 on my Voyager, and love them. Others have tried Progressive, or Works Performance Steel Trackers. Anything aftermarket will demonstrate just how bad the OEM shocks really are. The work on my shocks and forks was done by a specialist bike shock shop, and I'd recommend going that route just to have them tuned properly.

Once the seal is gone, your OEM shocks won't be adjustable. You should let the air out of the other one just so they're the same both sides.

Paul (Peg) Elliott
New Plymouth, NZ. '10 Voyager 1700
'02 Nomad 1500(sold) '97 VN800B (sold)
2 Honda's, 2 Suzuki's, 1 Yamaha (all dead)
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 09:51 AM
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I'm not sure about riding 2 up with no air in the shocks.

I have Progressive's on my Voyager and have been happy with them. They do lower the back of the bike by about an inch, to some that might be a problem, to me it made me feel like I'm sitting in the bike and not on it. You are right that Progressive doesn't list a shock for the Nomad, that got me to thinking. I see that the factory shocks are different part numbers for the Nomad and Voyager as well as the Vaquero. Yet Progressive lists the same shocks for the Voyager and Nomad. Might want to contact Progressive and ask them.
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 10:50 AM
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Hey,
I don't think you are hurting anything ridding one or two up with no air in the shocks as long as your not bottoming out when your sitting on the motor cycle. I just may make for a rough ride. I would run both shocks the same no air. I would also replace them as soon as you find out what your options are.
Partzilla has the stock shocks for $465.14 or $535.61 if you have Nomad Classic that includes shipping and depending where you are at no sales tax.
However the parts break down shows you can buy

If the problem is just the air valve on the shock where you pump it up you can get that on Partzilla for $17.53 I would check to see if the leak is there before I replaced the shocks pump it up and a little soapy water
will tell you that.


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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the feedback as different option folks. Stopped at the dealer to get my wife a helmet, the owner said to drop by when I’m riding and we can test to see if it’s the valve, this also gives him time to see what he has off the older bikes he has in stock.

I’m going to call progressive directly to see if their is a possibility that one sick fits both the nomade and voyager without it being listed on the site.
This sure is a great forum for newbies like me 😏
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 10:14 AM
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The dealer i bought my bike suggested i don even put air in the oem shocks. I am 275. He said over inflating is a major cause of premature tire wear. Just quoting him. I have had no issues with no air.
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